Leadmego


Quotes by Bob Menendez

Quotes by Bob Menendez

By failing to keep their end of the bargain, the Bush administration would allow New Jersey projects to deteriorate and make New Jersey highways and bridges less safe.
Don’t blame America for the thousands of Cubans who have been arrested, detained, and imprisoned by Castro for peacefully protesting the regime.
During the 2005 Bush tax holiday, corporations didn’t bring back the billions they stashed overseas to build new factories, increase wages, or create more jobs. The lion’s share of that windfall went to CEO raises and stock buybacks for investors on Wall Street.
Fidel’s oppressive legacy will haunt the Cuban regime and our hemisphere forever.
I am still doing my due diligence. A vote on a Supreme Court nominee is a lifetime appointment and when the court decides, it is the law of the land.
I don’t believe that, with the click of a mouse, you should be able to buy unlimited amounts of ammunition.
I don’t believe you need high capacity magazines to go hunt. If you have to use 100 rounds to shoot a deer, you’re in trouble.
I have devoted my life to serving the people of New Jersey and am forever thankful for all who have stood by me.
I want to have a good vote in the Senate so we send the message that the Republicans and the Democrats are together in favor of immigration reform.
I was raised poor, in a tenement building in Union City, New Jersey, the son of Cuban immigrants.
I was the first in my family to go to college.
I will not ascribe to the ‘Blame America’ club for vicious abuses of human rights, systemic exploitation of Cuban labor, unrelenting repression, and stifling censorship.
If you got up this morning and had fruits for breakfast, it was probably picked by the bent back of an immigrant worker. If you slept in a hotel or motel of the nation, you probably had your room done by an immigrant worker.
Latino patriots have served and fought in every war. They are artists, dancers, singers, poets and journalists, teachers and scientists. More and more Latinos are becoming entrepreneurs and businesspeople, contributing to the wealth and economic well-being of the nation.
My first priority is growing this economy in the long term, and stimulating it in the short term.
My mother made the courageous decision to flee a tyrannized Cuba in the 1950s and bring her children to the United States, where I was born.
My mother was a seamstress, my father an itinerant carpenter.
No matter how you slice it, limiting the SALT deduction forces New Jersey families to spend even more to subsidize Americans in less economically productive states, which take more than they ever give back to the federal government.
No matter the challenges ahead, I will never stop fighting for New Jersey and the values we share.
Our challenge in this regard will be to broaden the scope of our federal funds in terms of international diplomacy, development aid, and international assistance. Many Latinos in the United States look at Latin America and see trouble brewing.
Secondly, security. Both the challenges we face in the world and the responsibilities that our country has in protecting our people, are major issues. We need to do more in the context of domestic security.
Since he took power over half a century ago, Fidel Castro proved to be a brutal dictator who must always be remembered by his gross abuses of human rights, systemic exploitation of Cubans, unrelenting repression, and stifling censorship upon his own people.
Since the end of the Cold War, peace, prosperity, and progress have largely been the order of the day for hundreds of millions of people in the Americas, but not for the people of Cuba.
Sure, banking bills are important, but they don’t save lives.
The United States’ flag should only fly in Cuba when the island is free, when dissent is embraced, and when democracy is restored.
The answer dictates what the policy should be in our relationships with every country in the world.
The principles of fairness and equality for working men and women are deeply interwoven within the fabric of our nation’s history.
The road to some of the darkest moments of history have been paved with the rants of petty demagogues against ethnic minorities for centuries.
There are many domestic issues that give us a lot of common ground to work on. Health, education and immigration are among the areas where we share mutual goals and aspirations. There are also many values that we share as a communities.
There are plenty of opportunities for common grounds that we need to explore and strengthen. The Hispanic community has a strong affinity for our relationship with Israel.
There is one source of injustice in Cuba: The Castro regime. It is not United States policies and it is not the United States embargo.
There’s a difference between a free market and free-for-all market.
There’s a difference between, as I always say, the destination, the end point, and the journey. The journey has a lot of twists and turns. It isn’t always pretty.
This is the United States of America. It means we respond to our fellow Americans in times of crisis and emergency and disaster.
Tyrants and dictators have incited hatred against ethnic and religious minorities for centuries in order to consolidate power for themselves.
Ultimately, the NRA has maybe five million members. We are a nation of 320 million-plus, and it’s time we call out those who stand on the wrong side of history and spout the same old NRA talking points.
We are a nation of immigrants – all of us.
We believe very passionately that an international approach is necessary to achieve some of these goals.
We have the Second Amendment, but no privilege or right under the U.S. Constitution is unlimited.
We need strong public health institutions to respond to any challenge. We need to deal with critical infrastructure. The reality is that very little money has flowed to communities to help our first responders; to help our hospitals; to help the public health infrastructure.
We need to have a strong economy that can create employment opportunities and that can also produce the revenue that we need to defend our country at home and abroad.
We should seek international support for our mutual objectives abroad, in promoting freedom, democracy, respect for human rights, and also the elimination of weapons of mass destruction.
We wouldn’t turn over our customs service or our border patrol to a foreign government. We shouldn’t turn over the ports of the United States, either.
While we may be of different faiths, we have a strong sense of faith, family, community. We hold the values of freedom and human rights very high and I think that those are all a part of a very strong quilt that binds us together.
You can have a Second Amendment right, but not a Second Amendment right to an AR-15.
You don’t go hunting for a deer and shoot 50 rounds.

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