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Quotes by Bradley Walsh

Quotes by Bradley Walsh

‘Law & Order’ is a six-month shoot. Everything has to be crammed in. I had so much fun, but it wasn’t a holiday. We had seriously long days, and we’d finish at 8 P.M. and start again at 7 A.M. We were doing six-day weeks, which sometimes tripped onto the seventh. But I loved it all.
‘The Chase’ is such a strong format and so simple to follow. The best quiz show formats are the simplest.
A lot of comics make good actors. Actors make bad comics. They can’t do it the other way round.
All I ever wanted to do was play football. I was never one for revising, and I only left school with three O Levels.
Debra Stephenson and I are nothing more than friends and have a close working relationship – we certainly have not had an affair.
Doing ‘SunTrap’ after ‘The Chase’ is dipping into something different. That’s the whole basis of what I wanted to do with my career. I didn’t want to do the same thing all the time.
Don’t let anyone tell you that you’re not good enough. Don’t let anyone tell you that you’re too short, you’re too fat, you’re too thin, you’re too ugly – that’s nonsense.
Every day I learn something new, and, you know, you go through life’s experiences, and if you can bring every experience at some point somewhere in every drama or every story that you have to portray, you will come across an emotion or a feeling you have had some point in your life.
Every person I see has a story to tell.
Everyone’s got to have a bit of faith.
Everyone’s path is different. It’s not always about money – sometimes it’s about the journey.
Families have a sense of kinship that no four strangers would ever have as a team.
For actors coming out of long-running soaps, it’s really important to have a little break from the screen and look for roles that are removed from the ones they have played.
Have you ever noticed when people stop laughing, they say, ‘Oh dear?’
I am probably the oldest new artist Sony has ever signed.
I am very flattered that so many people loved ‘Chasing Dreams.’
I can’t dance to save my life, really – proper, proper dad dancing – but I was once at a wrap party for a show, and at the end of the night, they still hadn’t played ‘Dancing Queen’. So we extended the wrap party for 40 minutes and played ‘Dancing Queen’ 11 times in a row.
I can’t listen to rap music; it’s not my thing. They say that they’re the modern poets: of course they are, but it’s not for me.
I don’t think I can plate-spin, I’ve turned loads of things down because I just can’t get the time to do it.
I don’t want to do the same thing all the time, and I was thrilled to bits to do a BBC comedy. It’s the home of British comedy.
I first started as an actor, but there was no money in it, which is why I drifted into comedy.
I grew up listening to legends such as Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., and Tony Bennett.
I had spent so many years on ‘Law & Order: UK’ being a downtrodden detective standing on Hammersmith Bridge at six o’clock in the morning, being rained and snowed on, and I thought, ‘I’ll have a bit of a change of direction in my career and go and do ‘SunTrap’ in Gran Canaria.’
I like Hawaiian pizza.
I like people to have a bit of a laugh. Life is too short to not enjoy what you’re doing.
I like something you can hum along to.
I love pirates, and I’m a big fan of the Johnny Depp films.
I only got into show business because I quit football.
I reckon there could be an entire ‘It’ll Be Alright On The Night’ programme dedicated to me on ‘The Chase.’
I remember watching William Hartnell as the first ‘Doctor.’ Black and white made it very scary for a youngster like myself. I was petrified, but even though I’d watch most of it from behind the sofa through my fingers, I became a fan.
I remember watching the Twin Towers collapse. Because it was another country and looked like a film, I just sort of thought, ‘Oh.’ I didn’t think that much. Then three days later, it hit me. I was in a terrible state, and I was tearful for three or four days.
I said, ‘If I don’t play football for a living, I’m going to get into show business.’
I thought Oasis were great.
I thought, as a kid, that I was The Doctor’s biggest fan, so my mum and dad bought me a battery-operated Dalek. I must have worn it out, I played with it so much.
I used to watch ‘Doctor Who’ as a child with William Hartnell and Pat Troughton in the black-and-white days, so being cast is brilliant.
I want to try to help shift perceptions people may have of me as an actor.
I was a sheet metal worker, then a metal engineer, then a Pontin’s bluecoat, then a comedian. You can achieve anything you want if you put your mind to it.
I was earning a living. I was getting into more acting, then ‘Coronation Street’ came along, and it was the chance of a lifetime.
I’d love to still be able to play a bit of football, but my knees are shot to pieces.
I’m a man who doesn’t even have a mobile!
I’m good at observing people, physical stuff, which leant itself to acting.
I’m loving every second working with the brilliant Kayvan Novak; it’s a hoot from dawn to dusk!
I’m pretty laid back.
I’m so excited to be appearing in ‘Peter Pan.’ It really is an extraordinary production, the like of which Wembley has never seen before. It’s a big, bold arena extravaganza and festive treat with something for everyone.
I’m the black sheep: I got into telly.
I’ve – to be honest with you, I’ve never had an acting lesson. But I’ve been at drama school for 50 years.
If I’m doing a job, I’ll give it 100%, and that job gets my absolute focus, and everything else goes to the side. Then, that job is finished, I’ll concentrate on the next job.
It’s a young man’s game – standup comedy.
It’s just about being an entertainer; it’s about having all those tools over the years to do all sorts: films, musicals, playing a bit of piano, running a quiz show – it just becomes part of the job.
It’s much harder to lose weight as you get older.
Me and Stormzy. We’re gonna do an album. We’re gonna do an album of Nelson Riddle arrangements in grime form. It’s gonna be called ‘Griddle’.
Michael Kitchen is my favourite actor. We were at the same table at an awards once, and I was so thrilled, I had to go and sit next to him… he’s mesmeric.
My goodness, what a blast it is filming ‘Woody.’
My heart is just being in this industry. I’ve been lucky enough to have been in films, plays, and on radio.
My wife, Donna, is a fantastic cook!
Normally, if I’ve got an audition, I’m punctual, I’ve learnt my lines, and I’ll go looking smart.
On ‘The Chase,’ I don’t know what questions are going to appear, so they deliberately try and catch me out.
On my tombstone it will say, ‘At last, a day off.’
People don’t realise I have seriously bad blepharitis.
Stevie Wonder is extraordinary.
That’s what I think a journalist from the ’70s and ’80s should look like – as though he has led a full journalistic life.
The ‘Law & Order’ audition was so last-minute. I was already in a shabby suit, the journey was a complete disaster, my train stopped early, it was raining, and I had to show the cabbie the way… I rushed in apologising, gave this terrible reading, and ended up telling my whole journey to them. I must have bored them to tears.
The first real gig I went to was Randy Crawford in 1980. Seeing a big star like that was just fantastic.
The only time I scream is when I see the 5 A.M. start on the call sheet.
The times change, and if you don’t change with them, you get left behind.
There’s no point doing a job where you’re uncomfortable or doing something you dislike.
Time travel is a wonderful thing, isn’t it?
To be honest, I wasn’t the best stand-up comic.
To do a train wreck and make it look real on screen is tremendously skilful.
Unfortunately, my football career wasn’t very long. The reason I finished playing was because I fractured both ankles in a matter of months.
We’ve made it to the 1000th episode of ‘The Chase,’ as the show is so entertaining and informative. I’m so lucky I get to be a part of such a great team and have a laugh at work; I even learn some things, too.
You can’t give up. If you set yourself a target, you’ve got to keep on until you achieve it. It’s a matter of having pride in yourself.
You never know what’s coming round the corner. There’s only one thing coming round the corner – more corners.

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