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Quotes by Bradley Wiggins

Quotes by Bradley Wiggins

A lot of the bikes are carbon wheels now, and you don’t have as good a braking surface on a carbon wheel in the wet weather as you do on the old aluminium rims.
Cycling is a part of my life; it always has been, and I will always continue to cycle. I won’t be doing it on the world stage, doing it competitively, but I’ll still be out on the weekend with the masses riding around Richmond Park in my Team Sky jersey or whatever. I just love it.
Doing 40-minute track sessions is easy money compared to what we were doing on the Tour. What you used to think was hard now feels like a walk in the park.
Early Nineties – that was what it was all about: how people dressed on the terraces.
Everything I achieve affects my family as well, and suddenly, my kids’ dad became the most famous man in the country for a couple of weeks.
Growing up, the news agents round my way in Kilburn all had ‘Time Out’ on their shopfronts. The logo is a London icon.
How does Ronnie O’Sullivan play snooker the way he does? You can’t explain it.
I always compare myself to the best.
I always found that the more extreme and the more eccentric I was, that’s what would separate me. I always felt that I needed that separation; otherwise, I’d just be like everybody else.
I began cycling round the Serpentine because it was the only closed route in London where I could ride traffic-free.
I came to the conclusion that I’m not going to give up cycling because some people are cheating.
I can get obsessive with my training, but it makes you who you are.
I can train harder and put myself through more punishing efforts now than I used to do, having done the Tour de France, and come off the road now.
I certainly don’t hope to live forever, but on the other hand, I’m not reckless.
I didn’t like doing team presentations at races, being introduced as the winner of the Tour. I felt quite embarrassed by it.
I don’t make predictions. I know what I can do, and I try not to think too far ahead.
I drank because I enjoyed it. I was happy sitting at the end of the bar on my own, reading the paper. I’ve always enjoyed my own company, and that stems from riding alone. I never trained with anyone – and I still don’t. I’ve always been happy with my own thoughts, and that sums me up as an individual-pursuit rider.
I ended up in Hampstead for two weeks after the Tour, visiting a hospital every day before my granddad died. But he was more than my granddad. He was like my father.
I feel a different person in a lot of ways. I feel much more professional and dedicated to my trade than I used to be. I appreciate this ability I’ve got – and don’t take it for granted any more. That fits every aspect of my life now.
I feel like I was born to ride the track.
I had a small investment in Twofold, following guidance from my professional advisers. I had, however, claimed no tax relief of any amount in regard to this investment. Given the concerns raised about it, I have now instructed my advisors to withdraw me from the scheme with immediate effect.
I just felt that if the team is doing seven hours, I’d want to do eight. I’d always need to do more. I knew that would make me better than everybody else.
I know the freedom that cycling gives you in terms of being able to just jump on and go.
I may never get back to the track. The problem was that I was dominating my event, and the winning became slightly boring. I wanted new challenges, and I’ve got that on the road.
I said at the start of the race that the Tour is about being good for 21 days, being consistent every day, not having super days and bad days.
I still look back and think, ‘How did I win the Tour, going day to day under that pressure?’
I take my kids to school. It’s what keeps you normal.
I think my wife has struggled a bit because of how obsessive I get with what I eat and stuff.
I wanted to give an honest insight into a consuming Tour. It’s turned out pretty interesting because there aren’t many books out there documenting someone’s failure.
I wanted to put a really good kids’ racing bike out there for kids under 14: 10-year-olds, eight-year-olds, right down to balance bikes for kids.
I was a bit of a loner at school because I was into what I was into, that sort of scene; that is where the whole mod thing started, when I was 14-15.
I was a fan of Lance Armstrong, and I remember watching him win the Worlds in ’93 in Oslo.
I was born in Belgium, but we moved to Kilburn when I was one, so ‘Time Out’ has always been in the background of my life.
I went to see Ocean Colour Scene at Shepherds Bush and and felt part of something. They paved the way for me.
I wish I hadn’t said I’m going to retire.
I’d love to win Paris-Roubaix.
I’m not just a time triallist any more.
I’m not really a computer man, to be honest. I check my emails every couple of weeks.
I’ve always said the Olympics are special to me.
I’ve always shied away from computers, the Internet and all that. I’m a bit more traditional, really – pick up a newspaper, pick up a phone.
I’ve become more of a climber now – who still keeps that time trial as strong as ever. It gives me such self-belief. I feel a different athlete.
I’ve been in a lot of pressure situations; I know what I can do.
I’ve got a EC3-35 Gibson, which is pretty cherished. I’ve got a vintage Reichenbacker 330 in fireglow, which is the other one I look after and don’t let the kids touch.
I’ve got an opportunity that not many people have – to be the leader of Team Sky as I enter the prime years of my career.
If I can win the Tour de France, there is hope for everybody.
If I’m going to Kilburn, I get on a bus.
If we went to the Tour, I’d have to think, what would our purpose be? Would it be to win the Tour de France? I’m not sure I want that pressure.
If you didn’t go out every time it was raining, you wouldn’t get anything done. So it’s a case of making the right clothing choice in terms of waterproof, breathable, warm clothing.
In my eyes, I will never be up there with the Sir Steve Redgraves and the Sir Chris Hoys of this world. It’s not something that drives me; I just enjoy going to the Olympic Games. Just to be mentioned in the same breath as those people is an honour for me. I don’t ever think about those kind of things.
In sport, you just have to take what you can get.
It was what I’ve always wanted, more than anything: to be an Olympic hero rather than a Tour de France star, something I had from childhood.
It’s an Olympic Games, at the end of the day, and to represent your country at the Olympics is about as good as it gets. Put a gold medal on top of that, and it doesn’t ever get any better.
It’s difficult, and it’s an incredibly fine balance between getting your weight right down and being anorexic.
It’s really incredible to win an Olympic Gold in your home city.
It’s still the height of every four years for me, regardless of Tours de France and everything: it’s all about the Olympics.
My attitude is that, if you have nothing to hide, why not show it?
My dad was a professional track racer. It’s in my genes, and my first memories as a baby were in a velodrome.
My mum put herself in £50,000 of debt to service my sporting career. She did everything for me to pursue my dream.
Not having my father around has made me a better person.
On the Tour, you live in a bubble – your team, the other riders, the press – so you don’t know how it looks from outside.
One of my all-time favourite guitarists is, in fact, a bassist – John Entwistle from The Who. He’s one of my all-time favourites, the way he kind of expanded. I mean, he could have been a lead guitarist and been one of the best guitarists in the world. He wasn’t even bass player; he was a bass guitarist, and he took the bass to another level.
Pace judgement is everything in the hour record. If you can ride 16.1 or 16.2-second laps constantly for 221 laps, and not go 15.9s or 16.4s, it’s keeping it on the line every lap, lap after lap.
Part of me worries about upsetting people, because we all have perceptions about Olympic champions.
People always push the boundaries, especially when the rewards are so high financially.
People come up to me in the street and use words like ‘legend.’
People think sport is life and death – it’s not.
Sir Wiggo sounds nice.
Success is easy to take for granted.
That period afterwards, just hating being the winner of the Tour de France, hating cycling, hating the media for asking me questions about Lance Armstrong.
That’s the great thing about the Tour. There’s always next year and the chance to rectify everything.
The 2012 Olympics is a fantastic incentive for everyone to help leave a sporting legacy and show that Britain is truly a great sporting nation.
The Tour has changed, and I can’t make up my mind if it’s changed for the better or worse.
The changing of the goals helps keep the motivation fresh.
The more time I was spending with the British team, the more of a laugh I was having with them. It’s clean, their way of cycling; it’s more about what you can produce as an athlete.
They do say now in cycling that there’s no such thing as bad weather – it’s bad clothing.
Things change; your priorities change in life. So I’d never think of riding 100 miles on Christmas Day now, because I’ve got two kids, and it’s selfish.
Tom Simpson is like the Bobby Moore of British cycling.
Usually, the great thing about cycling is that anybody can watch it; it’s very accessible.
When I did win the Tour, I felt I was feted more in the U.K. for being an Olympic gold medallist… Then I come back to Europe to race, and they’re not interested in the Olympic gold; it’s about being the winner of the Tour de France – here he is.
When I won gold in Athens, I said to my wife Cath, who was pregnant, ‘This baby of ours will never want for anything.’ There was real pride in that – but it just didn’t happen.
When you are suddenly standing in front of a bunch of journalists being asked what it’s like being a British Olympic legend, it’s a bit much to take in.
When you get into the final week of the Tour de France, it becomes a different kind of race. As the distance and the fatigue really tell, that is when it becomes a proper test of everyone’s fitness.
When you see it from the outside, then you see just how great the Tour de France is.
When you’re in the heat of the moment, you need guys you can trust and who have been there for you.
Wives are around a lot longer than your sporting years.
Working-class people don’t tend to be wooed by celebrity.
You can plan physically to try to win the Tour, but I could never plan for what was going to happen after it.
You have got Team Sky leading the way on a professional front. They are quite open and have done everything possible on an anti-doping level.
You know what? I’ve won the Tour de France, and now I feel ready to talk about it.
You speak to the press at the Tour every day, but most often in a negative sense. Ninety per cent of the questions you are asked in the post-race press conferences are challenging or provocative, so you have to justify yourself; you have to try to give the right answers about every topic across the board.
You take for granted that you can walk. You do it every day, and then suddenly you can’t walk, and you have to remember, ‘How did I get out of this chair and start walking in the first place?’
You think if you win the Olympics, you’ll become a millionaire overnight. But I was still scraping the barrel, looking down the back of the settee for pound coins to buy a pint of milk.
You train all year for the physical aspect of cycling, but you can’t plan for what comes next. You’re still the same person. External perceptions might change, but inside, you’re the same.

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