Leadmego


Quotes by Brian Azzarello

Quotes by Brian Azzarello

‘100 Bullets’ is a novel on its own. ‘Brother Lono,’ other than the main character, has nothing to do with ‘100 Bullets.’
‘100 Bullets’ is such a post-modern noir; there are certain rules you gotta follow.
Basically, I think that Gotham is all of our urban nightmares and fears made into reality. Instead of hearing footsteps from behind you while you walk down the streets, turning around and finding nobody there, there is somebody there.
Believe it or not, but ‘White Heat’ and ‘Little Caesar’ keep dancing around in my brainpan while I’m writing ‘Moonshine.’
Characters with questionable morals are sexy.
Characters work really well when they’re reflective of the times that they’re operating in.
Civil war, now, 100 years in the future – the things that motivate human beings, they don’t change emotionally.
DC characters are from a different era than Marvel characters.
Denny O’Neil did some great things with Joker – I thought Greg Rucka used him really well in ‘Gotham Central.’
Everybody’s got a father. Even if he’s not the nicest guy in the world.
Everybody’s got scars. It’s not so unique.
For me, a story always goes out of a mistake. Somebody makes a mistake, and that becomes the story. Probably that explains why my series are kind of dark: because there’s a problem to begin with.
From a storytelling perspective, perfection is death.
Good people struggle against what’s imperfect about them. The people that we call ‘bad’ people embrace that kind of stuff, embrace the darker side.
Hollywood, they love everything, but they move like molasses. They’ll option anything – the worst idea in the world will get optioned just because they want to keep the other person from getting that idea.
I didn’t really like superheroes. I liked monsters and war comics.
I have a reputation for writing all kinds of hard-core, violent things.
I have never met a feminist who didn’t have a father.
I have to challenge myself, and I have to challenge the reader. We should be weaving and working on new stories and not the same story over and over.
I know ‘100 Bullets’ is not what traditionally people think of as comics.
I like alleys. They are the backdoor to everything.
I like being a cult figure.
I like everything that is wrong about Chicago.
I really like language – and slang in particular, and just the shorthand we use when we communicate with people.
I think a lot of superheroes seem to have the same value system; they just have a different costume. They’re all doing exactly the same thing.
I think portraying the Joker’s point of view would do a disservice to that character. As soon as you get inside his head he would lose so much power.
I think the Joker resonates with people as much as Batman does.
I think, personally, it’s our flaws that define us to us – or maybe it’s just me.
I’m a Cubs season ticket holder.
I’m always interested in using comics in different ways.
I’m happy with the way ‘100 Bullets’ ends terribly.
I’m interested in damaged people because we’ve all been roughed up in one way or another.
I’m kind of a graphic novel ambassador.
I’m not the monthly comic guy, and I never really have been.
I’m usually done working by Happy Hour.
If there’s nothing interesting about a character, people leave because there’s no desire to see what happens.
If you read any sort of, like, military general autobiographies or biographies, most of them never wanted to fight, you know? It’s necessary. War is necessary.
It is our mistakes that make us interesting, right?
It’s depicted in comics as, like, this gung-ho, ‘Let’s die in battle, in glory’ idea, because that’s just the genre we’re in. But that’s not what war really is.
Like, why is Batman so relevant? It’s because he gets reinvented constantly. There are a lot of stories you can tell with that character.
Man, I think mistakes – that’s what makes us distinct human beings. Those imperfections.
My mother would make a good Wonder Woman.
Nobody’s angry all the time, unless you’re a psycho.
Noir deals with the disenfranchised: people who can’t catch a break under normal circumstances. In noir books, you root for these people, but you know they are going to fail. That’s what makes them so compellingly human. I can relate to that kind of stuff.
Once you’re president, there’s blood on your hands – there’s no way around it.
One of the problems in modern comics is that they keep referencing themselves endlessly.
One of the reasons Batman works as a character is that it’s not beyond possibility that he could exist – you could become Batman if you had a billion dollars at your disposal. There’s nothing paranormal or superhuman or supernatural about that character. And I think his villains work the same way. You could be one of his villains just as easily.
Painted talking heads is just boring.
Paris is wild; it’s decadent… it’s so many things.
People have told me that the dialogue in ‘100 Bullets’ is very realistic. I don’t agree.
Superman is pretty much the way he was – you know – what he’s always been. A lot of the Marvel characters are products of their time. I think Batman, as a character, has been able to adapt; he’s pretty malleable.
The metro section of the newspaper every day is full of stuff I can use. It’s the greatest inspiration for me because it’s full of endings. That’s where the ends of stories show up.
These are the kinds of stories I’m really interested in telling: bad stories about bad people, I’m comfortable with.
This thing is such a ripple, the way lives are affected by gentrification. On one hand, yes, you’re cleaning up this area, you’re making it more livable for people. But you’re not saying anything about the people that live there.
To ground a character in reality, you have to use shades of gray.
We finished ‘Spaceman,’ and before we were even done with that, we had already been talking about what we were going to do next.
What’s the trick to writing a good bad guy? Well, for me, it’s always been the idea that you pit yourself against authority, you know? I think that’s what it takes – and then you can write villainous characters.
When I was writing about Gotham in ‘Broken City,’ I was writing about Chicago. I just substituted the names.
When I write, I’m talking to myself constantly to make sure that it sounds OK; it has kind of a nice rhythm and a nice jump to it.
When something is well-crafted, you know it, and the enjoyment comes from experiencing it.
Why do something that’s already been done?
Wonder Woman is not horrible. Her villains should be.
Writing ‘The Spirit’ is really fun.

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