Leadmego

Quotes by Bruce Rauner

Quotes by Bruce Rauner

A C.E.O.’s job is leadership, problem solving, and team building. I’ve done that my whole career.
Being a successful CEO, where I’ve driven a bottom line, assembled teams, driven results, that’s a critical benefit to running the state government.
Big problems usually come from big sources.
Crisis creates leverage to change.
Crisis creates opportunity.
For every challenge we face – unemployment, poverty, crime, income growth, income inequality, productivity, competitiveness – a great education is a major component of the solution.
For many young people, the minimum wage is a stepping stone to higher employment levels.
Frankly, I would never ask a supporter to bet big on me if I wouldn’t bet big on myself. It wouldn’t be fair.
Given my venture capital background, I know the tech sector well.
Government employees deserve to be treated fairly, but they do not deserve a significantly better deal than average Illinoisans get in their own jobs.
Government pensions are among the largest cost drivers for state and local governments.
Government unions should not be allowed to influence the public officials they are lobbying, and sitting across the bargaining table from, through campaign donations and expenditures.
Great teaching requires incredible talent and dedication, strong intellectual ability and interpersonal skill, real discipline and empathy.
I am a gun owner and a hunter and a gun rights supporter.
I am going to try to rip the economic guts out of Indiana. But we’re going to do it methodically and aggressively.
I am one of the baddest enemies anybody can have.
I certainly don’t need a job. Getting re-elected is not on my Top 10 list.
I don’t care what the headline is. I want the results.
I don’t have a Rolls. I don’t have a jet. That’s not me.
I don’t like to pay lip service. I don’t frankly like to talk about stuff.
I have my strong views and opinions. I really want to transform Illinois government because this state is failing the taxpayers and the children.
I have said, on a number of occasions, that we could have a lower minimum wage or no minimum wage.
I just want the state fixed, and I just want to do the right thing for the taxpayers.
I like to do things that get results. Results are all that matters.
I like to spend money on investments.
I tend to think that free-market conservative principles are the best ones for the CEO of a state.
I think we’ve got to be competitive here in Illinois. It’s critical we’re competitive. We’re hurting our economy by having the minimum wage above the national. We’ve got to move back to the national.
I want to do something that I’m proud of and that I can look back on with pride of accomplishment.
I want to transform state government. What it takes is a strong CEO type… a leader who can drive things.
I will advocate moving the Illinois minimum wage back to the national minimum wage.
I’ll be willing to do things that politicians won’t do. Because I don’t care who I upset.
I’m a big outdoorsman… I’m a big hunter. Avid fisherman. Hiker. Climber. Scuba diver. Skier. Love the outdoors.
I’m a business guy. I’m not a politician.
I’m a lover of fairs and corn dogs.
I’m a pretty disciplined investor and pretty disciplined buyer. I do my due diligence. I do my homework. I don’t waste money.
I’m not anti-union.
I’m not the most patient person in the world. I am one of the most persistent people in the world.
I’m very thoughtful and disciplined with my money.
I’ve been very engaged in Illinois and Chicago civic activities for a long time; mostly around building businesses and helping entrepreneurs grow companies, but also around education and education reform.
I’ve completely lost faith in the Democratic Party to truly serve the disadvantaged.
I’ve got to pick my fights at the right time.
If Republicans and Democrats commit to working together, we can reach a bipartisan, common-sense agreement to reverse Illinois’ economic decline and set the stage for a bright economic future.
If yelling and threatening, intimidating and chanting solved problems, Illinois wouldn’t have any problems. We’re good at that stuff.
Illinois has every reason to succeed. We have the hardest-working people in America, the best infrastructure in America, and the best location of any state.
Illinois will only get economically healthy if we stop focusing on growing minimum wages and start focusing on growing everyone’s wages.
In democracy – and the good thing about democracy, big change does not happen quickly, and you need a buy-in and a convincing, a selling, an arm-twisting to get big change. And that takes time.
Incremental increases in the minimum wage won’t address the underlying skills and investment gaps in Illinois.
It takes someone with a unique background to stand up to the threat of a strike and win.
Let’s put Illinois back on the road to prosperity.
Many of us have been touched by the magic of a great teacher. I know I have.
Mitch Daniels in Indiana was the best governor in America for eight years. I’ve gone to Indianapolis to study with him.
Money’s important, but it isn’t a motivator for me.
My wife and I believe that there’s nothing we do together as a community that’s more important than education.
Our government workers should be treated fairly and appropriately. They should have a decent retirement, but not a gold-plated system where they can retire multimillionaires in their 50s.
Our government works should be treated fairly and appropriately; they should have a decent retirement, but not a gold-plated system where they can retire multimillionaires in their 50s.
Ronald Reagan helped me become a Republican.
State universities in Illinois are a microcosm of our state government – broken with work rules and administrative bureaucracy.
Success is all about persistence and doing the right thing for the long term.
The critical thing is that we have to reduce the tax burden.
The fact is that politics in Illinois is a blood sport. It’s really rough. It’s really nasty.
The government union bosses are the most powerful politicians in Springfield.
The people of Illinois sent me to Springfield to end the era of unbalanced budgets and runaway debt.
The tax money belongs to the taxpayers. It doesn’t belong to the bureaucracy. And government is not a welfare system.
There are plenty of examples of very wealthy people who have run for office and failed, certainly in Illinois.
These political consultants love business guys who’ve never been in politics to try and take advantage of them. I get that.
Those who value a strong safety net for our neediest citizens see that every extra dollar spent on these unions is a dollar that cannot go to help the sick, the elderly, and the vulnerable.
Those who want low taxes and healthy job creation know that an unnecessary dollar going to these unions is a dollar that cannot reduce the tax burden on homeowners, small businesses, and job creators.
To restore our public schools, we must put an end to the selfish agenda of the union bosses.
Voters want conflicting things. They want a lot of government spending, but they don’t want higher taxes.
We cannot accept the status quo of throwing more taxpayer money into a broke and broken system.
We have a moral duty to have an efficient government.
We have to be bold, tough, and fundamentally change government because Springfield is broken.
We have to reduce the tax burden, whether it’s income tax for corporations or private individuals, and we should put a freeze on property taxes.
We must find a way to balance our tradition as a state welcoming of refugees while ensuring the safety and security of our citizens.
We need to focus on reducing property taxes. We need to focus on education funding. We need to focus on getting term limits on elected officials.
We’ve become a collectivist economy in Illinois. It’s crushing us. And no problem is going to get fixed unless we bring more economic freedom into the state. And I believe that very passionately.
We’ve talked through the fact that our family will be attacked. Our family will be dragged through the mud. My businesses that I’ve helped build and create will be attacked and dragged through the mud. That’s politics. I don’t spend a lot of time worrying about it or thinking about it.
When I was young, I had minimum wage jobs as a busboy, flipping burgers and parking cars.
When my mother was young, only two professions were open to women ; teaching and nursing. She chose nursing, but the teaching profession was full of talented women like her, confined there in part because they had few career options.
Where I’m an outsider is, I’m not a career politician.
Your average person in Illinois doesn’t really even know what workers’ comp is. The average person doesn’t know really what’s going on in the pension system. They know their taxes are too high; they know we’ve got a deficit. But getting that message out and helping the people of Illinois really understand what’s going on, that’s hard.

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