1. I try to stay out of the spotlight as much as humanly possible, because I think that when actors, whether or not they’ve chosen it or it has been thrust upon them, are living very public lives, it affects your ability to get lost in their performances.
  2. I try not to date where I work. It makes life easier. I don’t say no to anybody because I’d hope that people wouldn’t say no to me just because I’m an actor – but they’d have to be pretty extraordinary.
  3. I think we all want to really live good lives, and we all really want to have a healthy planet, although I don’t know if we’re supposed to be on it forever. Now, does that mean that we should be building rocket ships to shoot us into outer space? Well if we can, I think we should.
  4. I think that Jersey Shore is awesome. I’ve gone to Cape May every summer of my life.
  5. I think relationships are work, but love is a gift.
  6. I think fashion is a lot of fun. I love clothes. More than fashion or brand labels, I love design. I love the thought that people put into clothes. I love when clothes make cultural statements and I think personal style is really cool. I also freely recognize that fashion should be a hobby.
  7. I still can’t believe I’m the girl who got to play Fantine.
  8. I sing everywhere. I have a very patient husband. He says he doesn’t mind. But we’ve only been married a year and a half!
  9. I remember when I was starting out as a young actress, thinking, ‘Oh my God, I have the fattest face.’ Now I look at those pictures and I think, ‘So much collagen!’
  10. I really love yoga.
  11. I love the short-haired lifestyle.
  12. I love rom-coms, and I was bummed that they sort of stopped making them around the time I was old enough to be in them. But at the same time, I so respected the fact that the genre kind of needed an update. But you know, even when rom-coms were at their hey-day, very few people did it at the level of Nancy Meyers.
  13. I love it when people are able to interpret thoughts and feelings on fabric or some kind of material.
  14. I love fashion; I love being able to have fun with it, but I think I need to get a little bit more organised before I ever become a true fashionista.
  15. I look my best after an entire hair and makeup team has spent hours perfecting me. When do I feel my best? When I haven’t looked in a mirror for days, and I’m doing things that make me happy.
  16. I look around at my peers, and I’m so blown away by their talent and their beauty and their cool style, as well as their ability to be an actress and be a movie star and be good at it. I mean, they’re so good, and we’re all trying to get the same parts.
  17. I like to watch MTV for escapist pleasure, but when I saw Snooki, I saw my twin. I couldn’t lose myself in the show anymore because there I was.
  18. I kind of got my big break with ‘The Princess Diaries’ and during the press rounds for that everyone asked me: ‘Did you always want to be a princess growing up?’ And the truth was, no I wanted to be Catwoman.
  19. I have no aspirations of world domination through the pop charts. None at all.
  20. I grew up in a pretty large family. We were really close-knit, so I definitely want to have lots and lots of children.
  21. I gave up my struggle with perfection a long time ago. That is a concept I don’t find very interesting anymore. Everyone just wants to look good in the photographs. I think that is where some of the pressure comes from. Be happy. Be yourself, the day is about a lot more.
  22. I disagree with a couple of the stances of the Catholic Church. My older brother is gay, and it’s important for me to be able to love him completely and freely, and it’s important for me to spread beliefs in the world that are not going to limit people in their love. I can’t support a religion that doesn’t support my brother.
  23. I did work at Christie’s for a couple of weeks, getting ready for ‘The Devil Wears Prada,’ getting people coffee and doing whatever they needed around the office. It was amazing. I got to see some wonderful art, and everybody was really nice. It was great.
  24. I damaged my health during ‘Les Mis,’ which I didn’t want to mention in case it seemed like I was courting sympathy.
  25. I believe I’ve always been a big believer in equality. No one has ever been able to tell me I couldn’t do something because I was a girl.
  26. I am crushing so hard on Amy Schumer. Women like her who have chosen to stand up for themselves and face the bullies are being so embraced.
  27. A lot of people have told me, ‘You’re not this and so can’t play that,’ and I can’t tell you the amount of times I’ve been told I’m not sexy. I just go: ‘I’m a lot of things. Just because I don’t wear my sexiness overtly doesn’t mean that I can’t become that girl for a role.
  28. ‘One Day’ is definitely heartbreaking in a few ways, but one of the main ways is that my character and Jim Sturgess’s character are just people from two different worlds who love each other in so many ways and can’t quite seem to get it together.
  29. Your problem is how you are going to spend this one odd and precious life you have been issued. Whether you’re going to spend it trying to look good and creating the illusion that you have power over people and circumstances, or whether you are going to taste it, enjoy it and find out the truth about who you are.
  30. Your experiences will be yours alone. But truth and best friendship will rarely if ever disappoint you.
  31. You want to give me chocolate and flowers? That would be great. I love them both. I just don’t want them out of guilt, and I don’t want them if you’re not going to give them to all the people who helped mother our children.
  32. You can safely assume that you’ve created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.
  33. When we’re dealing with the people in our family – no matter how annoying or gross they may be, no matter how self-inflicted their suffering may appear, no matter how afflicted they are with ignorance, prejudice or nose hairs – we give from the deepest parts of ourselves.
  34. When hope is not pinned wriggling onto a shiny image or expectation, it sometimes floats forth and opens.
  35. When I was a kid, our family used to watch ‘Bonanza.’ I really liked having a Sunday night TV ritual.
  36. We’re often ashamed of asking for so much help because it seems selfish or petty or narcissistic, but I think, if there’s a God – and I believe there is – that God is there to help. That’s what God’s job is.
  37. We must not inflict life on children who will be resented; we must not inflict unwanted children on society.
  38. We can’t understand when we’re pregnant, or when our siblings are expecting, how profound it is to have a shared history with a younger generation: blood, genes, humor. It means we were actually here, on Earth, for a time – like the Egyptians with their pyramids, only with children.
  39. These days cry out, as never before, for us to pay attention, so we can move through them and get our joy and pride back.
  40. There is nothing as sweet as a comeback, when you are down and out, about to lose, and out of time.
  41. The worst part about celebrating another birthday is the shock that you’re only as well as you are.
  42. The women’s movement burst forth when I was fifteen. That was when I began to believe that life might semi-work out after all. The cavalry had arrived. Women were starting to say that you got to tell the truth now, that you had to tell the truth if you were going to heal and have an authentic life.
  43. The whistle is always waiting to be blown, and in some ways, it gets me to do better work.
  44. The reason I never give up hope is because everything is so basically hopeless.
  45. The opposite of faith is not doubt: It is certainty. It is madness. You can tell you have created God in your own image when it turns out that he or she hates all the same people you do.
  46. The first holy truth in God 101 is that men and women of true faith have always had to accept the mystery of God’s identity and love and ways. I hate that, but it’s the truth.
  47. The earth is rocky and full of roots; it’s clay, and it seems doomed and polluted, but you dig little holes for the ugly shriveled bulbs, throw in a handful of poppy seeds, and cover it all over, and you know you’ll never see it again – it’s death and clay and shrivel, and your hands are nicked from the rocks, your nails black with soil.
  48. The Giants are usually described as rag tag, kind of a great garage sale team, and the Democrats are described as the Mommies to the Republican Daddies; and everyone hates the mommies, but wait, wait – I didn’t intend to get into the pathos and thrill of being a Democratic Giants fan.
  49. The American way is to not need help, but to help.
  50. Summer nearly does me in every year. It’s too hot and the light is unforgiving and the days go on way too long.
  51. Sometimes I think God loves the ones who most desperately ache and are most desperately lost – his or her wildest, most messed-up children – the way you’d ache and love a screwed-up rebel daughter in juvenile hall.
  52. Some people won’t go the extra mile, and then on their birthday, when no one makes a fuss, they feel neglected and bitter.
  53. Some people seem to understand this – that life and change take time – but I am not one of those people.
  54. Seeing yourself in print is such an amazing concept: you can get so much attention without having to actually show up somewhere… You don’t have to dress up, for instance, and you can’t hear them boo you right away.
  55. Presents can make up for some of the disappointments that life doles out, such as it makes almost no sense and is coming to an end more quickly than ever.
  56. Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor.
  57. Pay attention to the beauty surrounding you.
  58. Nothing heals us like letting people know our scariest parts: When people listen to you cry and lament, and look at you with love, it’s like they are holding the baby of you.
  59. No one tells you that your life is effectively over when you have a child: that you’re never going to draw another complacent breath again… or that whatever level of hypochondria and rage you’d learned to repress and live with is going to seem like the good old days.
  60. No one is more sentimentalized in America than mothers on Mother’s Day, but no one is more often blamed for the culture’s bad people and behavior.
  61. No one can appropriate God, goodness, the Bible or Jesus. It just seems that way.
  62. My parents, and librarians along the way, taught me about the space between words; about the margins, where so many juicy moments of life and spirit and friendship could be found. In a library, you could find miracles and truth and you might find something that would make you laugh so hard that you get shushed, in the friendliest way.
  63. My mother’s eyes were large and brown, like my son’s, but unlike Sam’s, they were always frantic, like a hummingbird who can’t quite find the flower but keeps jabbing around.
  64. My mother was a not-too-devoted atheist. She went to Episcopal church on Christmas Eve every year, and that was mostly it.
  65. My mother might find a thin gold chain at the back of a drawer, wadded into an impossibly tight knot, and give it to me to untangle. It would have a shiny, sweaty smell, and excite me: Gold chains linked you to the great fairy tales and myths, to Arabia, and India; to the great weight of the world, but lighter than a feather.
  66. My idea of absolute happiness is to be in bed on a rainy day, with my blankie, my cat, and my dog.
  67. My coming to faith did not start with a leap but rather a series of staggers from what seemed like one safe place to another. Like lily pads, round and green, these places summoned and then held me up while I grew. Each prepared me for the next leaf on which I would land, and in this way I moved across the swamp of doubt and fear.
  68. Mothers are supposed to listen and, afterward, to respond with some wisdom and perspective, but these things were not my mother’s strong suit.
  69. Mothering has been the richest experience of my life, but I am still opposed to Mother’s Day. It perpetuates the dangerous idea that all parents are somehow superior to non-parents.
  70. Mother’s Day celebrates a huge lie about the value of women: that mothers are superior beings, that they have done more with their lives and chosen a more difficult path.
  71. Most of me was glad when my mother died. She was a handful, but not in a cute, festive way. More in a life-threatening way, that had caused me a long time ago to give up all hope of ever feeling good about having had her as a mother.
  72. Most marriages are a mess, and the children get caught between two bitter, antagonistic parents. My parents stayed married for 27 unhappy years, till their kids were grown, and this was a catastrophe for us.
  73. Life is really pretty tricky, and there’s a lot of loss, and the longer you stay alive, the more people you lose whom you actually couldn’t live without.
  74. Left to my own devices, my first inclination is to mess in other people’s lives. I secretly believe my whole family, and really the whole world, is my responsibility.
  75. It’s a great time to be alive.
  76. It was simple reality – most competitive tennis players in my day were privileged, spoiled, entitled and white. Also, many of them were beautiful, fit, tan and of good stock – great big hair and white teeth and long legs. Then there were the rest of us.
  77. If you don’t die of thirst, there are blessings in the desert. You can be pulled into limitlessness, which we all yearn for, or you can do the beauty of minutiae, the scrimshaw of tiny and precise. The sky is your ocean, and the crystal silence will uplift you like great gospel music, or Neil Young.
  78. If you asked me, parents were supposed to affect the life of their child in such a way that the child grows up to be responsible, able to participate in life and in community.
  79. If the present is really all we have, then the present lasts forever.
  80. If our lives are made up of a string of a thousand moments, at some of those moments we look a lot more spiritually evolved than at others.
  81. I’ve written six novels and four pieces of nonfiction, so I don’t really have a genre these days.
  82. I’ve known for years that resentments don’t hurt the person we resent, but they do hurt us.
  83. I’ve heard that our greatest cross to carry is ourselves – how gravely we fall short.
  84. I’ve heard people say that God is the gift of desperation, and there’s a lot to be said for having really reached a bottom where you’ve run out of any more good ideas or plans for everybody else’s behavior; or how to save and fix and rescue; or just get out of a huge mess, possibly of your own creation.
  85. I’m much calmer as I get older, but I’m still just as capable of getting that strung-out stressed-out feeling of mental and spiritual unwellness.
  86. I’m kind of a gossip hound, but watching the media whip the small fires into giant forest fires so that they can cover the result is infuriating.
  87. I’m drawn to almost any piece of writing with the words ‘divine love’ and ‘impeachment’ in the first sentence. But I know the word ‘divine’ makes many progressive people run screaming for their cute little lives, and so one hesitates to use it.
  88. I’d like to learn to meditate with more enthusiasm. I can sit down and get quiet for 20 minutes, but it just has not been a part of my Christianity at all.
  89. I write because writing is the gift God has given me to help people in the world.
  90. I would seriously rather be in a long line at the DMV than eat with people I don’t know.
  91. I woke up full of hate and fear the day before the most recent peace march in San Francisco. This was disappointing: I’d hoped to wake up feeling somewhere between Virginia Woolf and Wavy Gravy.
  92. I wish I had thrown out the bathroom scale at age 16. Weighing yourself every morning is like waking up and asking Dick Cheney to validate your sense of inner worth.
  93. I went to church with my grandparents sometimes and I loved it.
  94. I went to Goucher College in Maryland for the best possible reasons – to learn – but then I dropped out at 19 for the best possible reasons – to become a writer.
  95. I was the angriest daughter on earth, and also, one of the most devoted.
  96. I was raised with no religious training or influence. Except the influence was to be a moral and ethical person at the secular level. And to be a peace marcher, an activist for civil rights, peace and justice.
  97. I was raised in a family where none of us ever raised a voice, so there was no room to express feelings of rage or even unabashed joy – a little bashed joy, here or there, or being mildly disgruntled.
  98. I was raised by my parents to believe that you had a moral obligation to try and help save the world.
  99. I used to tell my writing students that they must write the books they wished they could come upon – because then the books they hungered and thirsted for would exist.
  100. I used to love to untangle chains when I was a child. I had thin, busy fingers, and I never gave up. Perhaps there was a psychiatric component to my concentration but like much of my psychic damage, this worked to everyone’s advantage.
  101. I try to write the books I would love to come upon that are honest, concerned with real lives, human hearts, spiritual transformation, families, secrets, wonder, craziness – and that can make me laugh.
  102. I think Jesus is divine love manifest on Earth, as it comes through the community of Christians.
  103. I spent my whole life helping my mother carry around her psychic trunks like a bitter bellhop. So a great load was lifted when she died, and my life was much easier.
  104. I see that children fill the existential hollowness many people feel; that when we have children, we know they will need us, and maybe love us, but we don’t have a clue how hard it is going to be.
  105. I read the same amount of nonfiction and fiction.
  106. I quit my last real job, as a writer at a magazine, when I was twenty-one. That was the moment when I lost my place of prestige on the fast track, and slowly, millimeter by millimeter, I started to get found, to discover who I had been born to be, instead of the impossibly small package, all tied up tightly in myself, that I had agreed to be.
  107. I loved every second of Catholic church. I loved the sickly sweet rotting-pomegranate smells of the incense. I loved the overwrought altar, the birdbath of holy water, the votive candles; I loved that there was a poor box, the stations of the cross rendered in stained glass on the windows.
  108. I love readings and my readers, but the din of voices of the audience gives me stage fright, and the din of voices inside whisper that I am a fraud, and that the jig is up. Surely someone will rise up from the audience and say out loud that not only am I not funny and helpful, but I’m annoying, and a phony.
  109. I like to read away as much of the afternoon as possible, until real life rears its ugly head.
  110. I like the desert for short periods of time, from inside a car, with the windows rolled up, and the doors locked. I prefer beach resorts with room service.
  111. I just try to love and serve everyone, and bring everyone water, and lend an ear; that’s what Jesus said to do.
  112. I have a very dark sense of humor. I swear. I have a very playful relationship with Jesus.
  113. I hate the summer.
  114. I happen to be a Christian, but I know that there is one God. People worshipping goodness and love and kindness and truth are worshipping the same God.
  115. I got a lot of things that society had promised would make me whole and fulfilled – all the things that the culture tells you from preschool on will quiet the throbbing anxiety inside you – stature, the respect of colleagues, maybe even a kind of low-grade fame.
  116. I go to church every Sunday, which is like going to the gas station once a week and really, really filling up.
  117. I feel incredibly successful. I make a living as a writer and am able to help support a big family, my church, my bleeding-heart causes.
  118. I don’t want something special. I want something beautifully plain.
  119. I don’t have very sophisticated taste in music. I listen to a lot of folk music. I like reggae.
  120. I do not have deep theological understanding or opinion, but I do not read the Bible as the literal word of God.
  121. I do not at all understand the mystery of grace – only that it meets us where we are but does not leave us where it found us.
  122. I didn’t write about my mother much in the third year after she died. I was still trying to get my argument straight: When her friends or our relatives wondered why I was still so hard on her, I could really lay out the case for what it had been like to be raised by someone who had loathed herself, her husband, even her own name.
  123. I did not raise my son, Sam, to celebrate Mother’s Day. I didn’t want him to feel some obligation to buy me pricey lunches or flowers, some annual display of gratitude that you have to grit your teeth and endure.
  124. I am the woman I grew to be partly in spite of my mother, and partly because of the extraordinary love of her best friends, and my own best friends’ mothers, and from surrogates, many of whom were not women at all but gay men. I have loved them my entire life, even after their passing.
  125. I am skittish about relationships, as most of the marriages I’ve seen up close have been ruinous for one or both parties.
  126. I am not writing to try and convert people to fundamental Christianity. I am just trying to share my experience, strength and hope, that someone who is as messed up and neurotic and scarred and scared can be fully accepted by our dear Lord, no questions asked.
  127. I am going to try to pay attention to the spring. I am going to look around at all the flowers, and look up at the hectic trees. I am going to close my eyes and listen.
  128. I am going to notice the lights of the earth, the sun and the moon and the stars, the lights of our candles as we march, the lights with which spring teases us, the light that is already present.
  129. I am an Aries. Although I do not believe in astrology, I think this is exactly the right sign to have been born under.
  130. I accidentally forgot to graduate from college.
  131. Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You wait and watch and work: you don’t give up.
  132. For me, Jesus is my cleft in the rock. He is my safest friend, my safe totally loving accepting big brother.
  133. Everyone is flailing through this life without an owner’s manual, with whatever modicum of grace and good humor we can manage.
  134. Every woman’s path is difficult, and many mothers were as equipped to raise children as wire monkey mothers. I say that without judgment: It is, sadly, true. An unhealthy mother’s love is withering.
  135. Evangelical Christians and I can sit down and talk one on one about how much we love Jesus, and yet I’m not carried in Christian bookstores.
  136. E-books are great for instant gratification – you see a review somewhere of a book that interests you, and you can start reading it five minutes later.
  137. Being on a book tour is like being on the seesaw when you’re a little kid. The excitement is in having someone to play with, and in rising up in the air, but then you’re at the mercy of those holding you down, and if it’s your older brother, or Paul Wolfowitz, they leap up, so that you crash down and get hurt.
  138. Bananas are great, as I believe them to be the only known cure for existential dread. Also, Mother Teresa said that in India, a woman dying in the street will share her banana with anyone who needs it, whereas in America, people amass and hoard as many bananas as they can to sell for an exorbitant profit. So half of them go bad, anyway.
  139. All parents are an embarrassment to their kids. Often, grandparents are the relief. Kids don’t have to resist you.
  140. Alice Adams wrote a sweet note to me after my first novel came out when I was 26, and I was so blown away that I sent her a bunch of stamps by return mail. I have no idea what I was thinking. It was a star-struck impulse.
  141. Age has given me the gift of me; it just gave me what I was always longing for, which was to get to be the woman I’ve already dreamt of being. Which is somebody who can do rest and do hard work and be a really constant companion, a constant, tender-hearted wife to myself.
  142. A whole lot of us believers, of all different religions, are ready to turn back the tide of madness by walking together, in both the dark and the light – in other words, through life – registering voters as we go, and keeping the faith.
  143. When the wedding march sounds the resolute approach, the clock no longer ticks, it tolls the hour. The figures in the aisle are no longer individuals, they symbolize the human race.
  144. What a circus act we women perform every day of our lives. Look at us. We run a tightrope daily, balancing a pile of books on the head. Baby-carriage, parasol, kitchen chair, still under control. Steady now! This is not the life of simplicity but the life of multiplicity that the wise men warn us of.
  145. Travelers are always discoverers, especially those who travel by air. There are no signposts in the sky to show a man has passed that way before. There are no channels marked. The flier breaks each second into new uncharted seas.
  146. To give without any reward, or any notice, has a special quality of its own.
  147. To be deeply in love is, of course, a great liberating force.
  148. Those fields of daisies we landed on, and dusty fields and desert stretches. Memories of many skies and earths beneath us – many days, many nights of stars.
  149. There are no signposts in the sky to show a man has passed that way before. There are no channels marked. The flier breaks each second into new uncharted seas.
  150. The wave of the future is coming and there is no fighting it.
  151. The sea does not reward those who are too anxious, too greedy, or too impatient. One should lie empty, open, choiceless as a beach – waiting for a gift from the sea.
  152. The punctuation of anniversaries is terrible, like the closing of doors, one after another between you and what you want to hold on to.
  153. The only real security is not in owning or possessing, not in demanding or expecting, not in hoping, even. Security in a relationship lies neither in looking back to what it was, nor forward to what it might be, but living in the present and accepting it as it is now.
  154. The most exhausting thing in life is being insincere.
  155. The loneliness you get by the sea is personal and alive. It doesn’t subdue you and make you feel abject. It’s stimulating loneliness.
  156. The bearing, rearing, feeding and educating of children; the running of a house with its thousand details; human relationships with their myriad pulls – women’s normal occupations in general run counter to creative life, or contemplative life, or saintly life.
  157. Perhaps this is the most important thing for me to take back from beach-living: simply the memory that each cycle of the tide is valid; each cycle of the wave is valid; each cycle of a relationship is valid.
  158. Only in growth, reform, and change, paradoxically enough, is true security to be found.
  159. One cannot collect all the beautiful shells on the beach. One can collect only a few, and they are more beautiful if they are few.
  160. One can never pay in gratitude; one can only pay ‘in kind’ somewhere else in life.
  161. Men kick friendship around like a football, but it doesn’t seem to crack. Women treat it like glass and it goes to pieces.
  162. Life is a gift, given in trust – like a child.
  163. It takes as much courage to have tried and failed as it does to have tried and succeeded.
  164. It is only in solitude that I ever find my own core.
  165. If you surrender completely to the moments as they pass, you live more richly those moments.
  166. I must write it all out, at any cost. Writing is thinking. It is more than living, for it is being conscious of living.
  167. I have been overcome by the beauty and richness of our life together, those early mornings setting out, those evenings gleaming with rivers and lakes below us, still holding the last light.
  168. I feel we are all islands – in a common sea.
  169. I do not believe that sheer suffering teaches. If suffering alone taught, all the world would be wise, since everyone suffers. To suffering must be added mourning, understanding, patience, love, openness and the willingness to remain vulnerable.
  170. I believe that what woman resents is not so much giving herself in pieces as giving herself purposelessly.
  171. How one hates to think of oneself as alone. How one avoids it. It seems to imply rejection or unpopularity.
  172. How hard it is to have the beautiful interdependence of marriage and yet be strong in oneself alone.
  173. Grief can’t be shared. Everyone carries it alone. His own burden in his own way.
  174. Good communication is just as stimulating as black coffee, and just as hard to sleep after.
  175. For sleep, one needs endless depths of blackness to sink into; daylight is too shallow, it will not cover one.
  176. For happiness one needs security, but joy can spring like a flower even from the cliffs of despair.
  177. Don’t wish me happiness – I don’t expect to be happy it’s gotten beyond that, somehow. Wish me courage and strength and a sense of humor – I will need them all.
  178. Certain springs are tapped only when we are alone. Women need solitude in order to find again the true essence of themselves; that firm strand which will be the indispensable center of a whole web of human relationships.
  179. By and large, mothers and housewives are the only workers who do not have regular time off. They are the great vacationless class.
  180. Arranging a bowl of flowers in the morning can give a sense of quiet in a crowded day – like writing a poem or saying a prayer.
  181. America, which has the most glorious present still existing in the world today, hardly stops to enjoy it, in her insatiable appetite for the future.
  182. After all, I don’t see why I am always asking for private, individual, selfish miracles when every year there are miracles like white dogwood.
  183. You should know how to take care of yourself. That’s one of the things that I got from my mother most – she always said that if you don’t take care of yourself, no one will.
  184. You may not know your complete family history, but the reality is everyone has something, and as you get older, you start to worry about these things more. Health is not sort of like a 6-month project. Health is a lifetime accumulation of behaviors.
  185. You don’t necessarily want your physician to have all your information.
  186. You don’t do new things and try to change the system without generating debate.
  187. You can get so much value just from being genotyped.
  188. You are not just about death and disease.
  189. Women who have been recently diagnosed with breast cancer can learn a tremendous amount from women who have already been treated.
  190. Why should I need a prescription to spit into a vial and get my DNA read? Why can’t I get my own blood drawn without a doctor’s permission? It’s my blood.
  191. When you try new things, you will make mistakes. That’s OK.
  192. When you have a laser focus, and you get distracted by what other people say, you can lose that laser focus.
  193. We should revel in tons and tons and tons of ideas. Some of them will manifest and lead to a drug discovery, and some will not.
  194. We have been trained not to think about our health care until there’s a problem.
  195. We don’t have enough data about how lifestyle decisions impact our health.
  196. We all want our genetic information. Why would you not want genetic information?
  197. Traditionally, when you talk to people who have Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s, they’ll talk about how they’re in five or six studies, and they’ve been sequenced by each study. That’s just fat in the system. Just have a single data set that then you can share. You can make the entire system more efficient.
  198. There’s nothing worse than walking into a hospital and seeing people sick and miserable and having a horrible treatment.
  199. There’s nothing more raw in life than when you’re sick.
  200. There’s not enough competition and innovation in healthcare.
  201. There’s massive government initiatives going around the world, and you see that there’s a real enthusiasm for genetics.
  202. There’s going to be space travel at some point.
  203. There’s enough data showing that the fitter you are, the better you eat, the more likely you are to stay healthy longer.
  204. There’s a whole group of people who are 100-plus and have no disease. Why?
  205. There’s a beauty in being unrealistic.
  206. There should be choice in healthcare.
  207. The world needs more social innovations.
  208. The reality is that the only way change comes is when you lead by example.
  209. The pharma industry is one of the few industries that comes up every year and brags about how much worse they got – like, now it costs $2 billion to make a drug, and it was a billion 5 years ago.
  210. The paternalism of the medical industry is insane.
  211. The goal of having more and more information is really to better be able to predict what is your health outcome going to be.
  212. The fact that my environment influences my life so much – and that my environment is in my control – gives me a great sense of empowerment over my health and my life.
  213. The consumer is really underutilized in health care.
  214. The challenge in a startup is you hit a lot of turbulence, and you want people who understand that it’s just turbulence and not a crisis.
  215. TIVO was a big shift in how people watched TV, but everyone understood the concept of TV. No one really understands the concept of, well why would I want my genetic information?
  216. Some genetic variants can be informative about one’s risk for Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease.
  217. Physicians should be genotyped.
  218. Pharma companies don’t have a direct relationship with consumers, so they’re always subjects.
  219. People want to be in charge of health information. They want it available the same way online banking is available.
  220. People are used to dealing with risk. You are told if you smoke, you are at higher risk of lung cancer. And I think people are able to also understand, when they are told they are a carrier for a genetic disease, that is not a risk to them personally but something that they could pass on to children.
  221. People are used to dealing with risk.
  222. Part of the beauty of Silicon Valley is that people generally encourage you to think crazy. It’s the hypothesis that there’s nothing sacred that can’t be changed.
  223. Our understanding of how DNA informs our health and development is advancing at an incredible pace.
  224. Our approach to medicine is very 19th-century. We are still in the dark ages. We really need to get to the molecular level so that we are no longer groping about in the dark.
  225. One of the things that got me interested in genetics was the relationship between genes and environment. We are all dealt a certain deck of cards, but our environment can influence the outcomes.
  226. One of the most exciting aspects of 23andMe is that we’re enabling you to watch a revolution unfold live during your lifetime, and I think that the decoding of the genome, in my opinion, is the most fascinating discovery of our lifetime, and you get to be part of it.
  227. One of the big drivers for me is that health care is a very elitist system. As much as we try to make it free and democratic for all, the reality is that it’s expensive and not all therapies are accessible to all people. So I have been very focused on making sure that we democratize genetic information so it’s available to everyone.
  228. One of the best aspects of health care reform is it starts to emphasize prevention.
  229. Obesity is awesome from a Wall Street perspective. It’s not just one disease – there are all sorts of related diseases to profit from.
  230. Nobody can quantify for you what’s the impact of eating fiber every day, for instance. We can say we think it’s good. But some people might say ‘Oh, it reduces your risk of colon cancer by 20%, some people might say it reduces your risk by 25%.’
  231. My sister learned she was a carrier for a recessive disease, Bloom syndrome, late in one of her pregnancies. I remember the panicked call and the weeks of worry as she and her husband awaited his test results; if he was also a carrier, this meant their daughter had a one in four chance of being born with the disorder.
  232. My perfect weekend is going for a walk with my family in the park. I don’t think there’s anything better.
  233. My parents were passionate about what they did, very cheap, and very focused on doing good in society.
  234. My mom was a problem solver.
  235. My family and I were some of the first people to be genotyped.
  236. My divorce wasn’t fun.
  237. Most medications don’t work effectively for a lot people.
  238. Making personalized medicine a reality will require a strong partnership between 23andMe and the physician and medical communities.
  239. Knowing your genetic health risks will help you make better decisions.
  240. Just as computer technology and the Internet created whole new industries and extraordinary benefits for people that extend into almost every realm of human endeavor from education to transportation to medicine, genetics will undoubtedly benefit people everywhere in ways we can’t even imagine but know will surely occur.
  241. It’s worth knowing more about the complicated environmental and genetic factors that could explain why traumatic brain injuries lead to long-term disabilities in some people and not in others.
  242. It’s up to all of us, the consumers, to take charge of our health. It’s almost like voting. It’s your responsibility.
  243. It’s not just professional athletes and soldiers who are at risk from traumatic brain injury. More than 1.7 million people a year sustain a traumatic brain injury, and about 50,000 of them die each year, according the Centers for Disease Control. There are both emotional and financial costs from these injuries.
  244. It’s interesting: I think, genetically, there are people who need different things, like exercise. I need the exercise, others not so much, and I think more and more, we’ll start to understand why people’s bodies function in certain ways.
  245. It’s crazy to me that in this world of electronic medical records Walmart has so much information about how we shop, but no one has that information about our health. Why can’t my doctor say, ‘Wow, Anne, based on your lifestyle and behavior, you’re five years from being diabetic.’ But I can go to Target, and they know exactly what I’m going to buy.
  246. It is important to democratize personal genetics and make it more accessible.
  247. It doesn’t matter how rich or poor you are: when you’re sick, you want the exact same thing.
  248. In Silicon Valley, you want things done instantly.
  249. If you don’t read it, you don’t know. I mean, that’s why I have a PR team. They read it and tell me if there’s something, and that keeps you focused. I know my family and me well enough; why do I need to read about myself? I’m not going to change, I’m very stubborn in this way. I am what I am.
  250. If consumers were more empowered, they would take more responsibility for their health.
  251. If I know I’m at genetically high risk of Alzheimer’s, maybe I don’t plan to retire at 80, and maybe I’m more proactive about where I’m going to live and who’s going to take care of me.
  252. I’ve come to the conclusion that you shouldn’t have to see a genetic counselor. It should be a choice.
  253. I’m not going to change; I’m very stubborn in this way. I am what I am.
  254. I’m at a slightly higher risk for type 2 diabetes, and my grandmother had diabetes. My hemoglobin a1c, which is one of the measures, started being a little high when I was drinking a ton of that coconut water.
  255. I’m action-oriented.
  256. I was really raised in a gender-neutral household. I always knew I was a girl, but it never occurred to me that there was a limitation.
  257. I was brought up with a scientific outlook on life. It’s the way my father deciphers the world – whether it’s football, politics or hairstyles. So I don’t get anxious about the future, because I was raised to believe and accept that nothing stays the same, and the best way to survive is to adapt.
  258. I want the world’s data accessible.
  259. I usually start my day when my kids wake up.
  260. I think we’re just scratching the surface. One of the most exciting aspects of 23andMe is that we’re enabling you to watch a revolution unfold live during your lifetime, and I think that the decoding of the genome, in my opinion, is the most fascinating discovery of our lifetime, and you get to be part of it.
  261. I think we are definitely suffering from an information overload, but I believe that there is going to be better and better ways of organizing that information and processing it so that it will enhance your daily life.
  262. I think there’s a point to regulating, because there are snake oil companies.
  263. I think there’s a lot of misunderstanding about genetic information and what you can and cannot learn. One of the things we try to do is educate individuals that knowing information is empowering.
  264. I think there’s a lot of misunderstanding about genetic information and what you can and cannot learn.
  265. I think the biggest problem in clinical trials is that they are underpowered. And that fundamentally, the studies are just too small.
  266. I think that the idea of people wanting to steal your genome remains a little bit in the world of science fiction. It’s a new technology, and it’s new science that people are becoming familiar with. It’s critical for us to do everything we can to enable the privacy level that people want.
  267. I think that the idea of people wanting to steal your genome remains a little bit in the world of science fiction.
  268. I think that for people who are trying to make a difference, you have to start the company being naive. You wouldn’t do it if you understood all the work. I work a lot. I wish it was easier.
  269. I think life is pretty awesome.
  270. I think it’s important to have flexibility to work wherever is best for you. I actually encourage people to work at the cafe – or from home or wherever works best for them.
  271. I think it is absolutely crazy in this day and age that I have to go through a trial and error method to see if my child is allergic to an antibiotic or peanuts. I should just know.
  272. I think being on a constraint with money makes you much more creative.
  273. I still meet old-school scientists who are like, ‘Oh honey, women aren’t good at science.’ You kind of dismiss them as insane.
  274. I spend a lot of my spare time with my family. My sisters, parents, and in-laws all live nearby.
  275. I like company lunches because I think going out wastes valuable time; plus, a lot of good ideas come up over lunch.
  276. I hope that Los Altos is one of the first cities to have self-driving cars, and if that’s true, well, awesome, because there’s a lot of parking lots that we could get rid of and use for parks. That would be amazing!
  277. I have mothers with small children come to me and say, ‘You found that I had early breast cancer – because of you, I don’t have cancer.’ You’ve just prevented that person from dying early, and to prevent an early, unnecessary death is incredibly meaningful.
  278. I have an unreasonably optimistic view of the world.
  279. I have always been interested in health care and doing something that is dramatic.
  280. I had a very unusual childhood in that I grew up on the Stanford campus and I never moved.
  281. I guess I’m just fiercely independent.
  282. I grew up with my mom being very, very cheap, so when it’s free, I’m like, ‘Oh my God, it’s free – I have to take as much as I can!’
  283. I get parking tickets all the time.
  284. I first heard about ‘genes’ when I was six years old. At dinner one night, I heard my mom tell my sister, ‘It’s in your genes.’
  285. I feel that gender balance in the work environment is actually the best recipe for success.
  286. I don’t necessarily want my physician making all my decisions.
  287. I do believe at some point in time everyone will be genotyped at birth.
  288. I carry my iPad and laptop with me everywhere.
  289. I believe that we all have freedom to shape our own life and the world around us.
  290. Health is not sort of like a 6-month project. Health is a lifetime accumulation of behaviors.
  291. Genetic testing in the future is going to be seen as critical as testing your cholesterol.
  292. For people who want to be proactive about their health, there is a lot of information that we can provide. If you are going to have children, I think you have a responsibility to know if you are carrying anything. A lot of people tend to do the testing once they are pregnant.
  293. Fashion was never my forte.
  294. FDA clearance is an important step on the path towards getting genetic information integrated with routine medical care.
  295. Everyone’s going to die, and everyone’s going to get sick at some point. But I do believe that there are choices you can make in life that will make you as healthy as possible.
  296. Every couple of weeks, someone writes in and says, ’23andMe saved my life.’
  297. Employment and health insurance are now protected by the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act.
  298. Data helps solve problems.
  299. Billions of dollars have been put into genetic research.
  300. Big data is going to make us all healthier.
  301. Big challenges are an accumulation of small challenges.
  302. Being able to do research in a real-time way is the way research needs to be done in the future.
  303. As the knowledge around personalized medicine continues to grow, consumers should expect their healthcare providers to begin to incorporate genetic information into their treatments and preventative care.
  304. As a parent, the most responsible thing I can do is get as much information about my children as possible so I can then think through how I can make them as healthy as possible.
  305. April 25th is DNA Day. I know, you probably had no idea.
  306. All the kids from my nursery school are still in touch.
  307. A solid foundation in genetics is increasingly important for everyone.
  308. A lot of genetic testing hasn’t been integrated into healthcare because it has been expensive. I want to make people realise that they have the ability to be in charge of their own health.
  309. A few small changes in your DNA can turn your eyes blue, make you lactose intolerant or put some curl in your hair.
  310. 23andme is very independent and committed to focusing on transparency.
  311. 23andMe set out to try and change healthcare – this is not an easy business. This is not a coffee shop in Austin.
  312. 23andMe is pleased to bring public funding to bear on data and research driven by the public – our more than 180,000 customers.
  313. Your work is to keep cranking the flywheel that turns the gears that spin the belt in the engine of belief that keeps you and your desk in midair.
  314. You can’t test courage cautiously.
  315. You are wrong if you think that you can in any way take the vision and tame it to the page. The page is jealous and tyrannical; the page is made of time and matter; the page always wins.
  316. Write as if you were dying. At the same time, assume you write for an audience consisting solely of terminal patients. That is, after all, the case. What would you begin writing if you knew you would die soon? What could you say to a dying person that would not enrage by its triviality?
  317. Write as if you were dying.
  318. Write about winter in the summer.
  319. When I teach, I preach. I thump the Bible. I exhort my students morally. I talk to them about the dedicated life.
  320. When I first read the words ‘introvert’ and ‘extrovert’ when I was 10, I thought I was both.
  321. There is no such thing as an artist – only the world, lit or unlit, as the world allows.
  322. There is no shortage of good days. It is good lives that are hard to come by.
  323. There is a muscular energy in sunlight corresponding to the spiritual energy of wind.
  324. There is a certain age at which a child looks at you in all earnestness and delivers a long, pleased speech in all the true inflections of spoken English, but with not one recognizable syllable.
  325. The writer studies literature, not the world. He is careful of what he reads, for that is what he will write.
  326. The writer studies literature, not the world.
  327. The surest sign of age is loneliness.
  328. The sensation of writing a book is the sensation of spinning, blinded by love and daring. It is the sensation of a stunt pilot’s turning barrel rolls, or an inchworm’s blind rearing from a stem in search of a route. At its worst, it feels like alligator wrestling, at the level of the sentence.
  329. The painter… does not fit the paints to the world. He most certainly does not fit the world to himself. He fits himself to the paint. The self is the servant who bears the paintbox and its inherited contents.
  330. The notion of the infinite variety of detail and the multiplicity of forms is a pleasing one; in complexity are the fringes of beauty, and in variety are generosity and exuberance.
  331. The mind of the writer does indeed do something before it dies, and so does its owner, but I would be hard put to call it living.
  332. The dedicated life is worth living. You must give with your whole heart.
  333. The Pulitzer is more useful than meaningful.
  334. Spend the afternoon. You can’t take it with you.
  335. People love pretty much the same things best. A writer looking for subjects inquires not after what he loves best, but after what he alone loves at all.
  336. Our family was on the lunatic fringe. My mother was always completely irrepressible. My father made crowd noises into a microphone.
  337. Much has been written about the life of the mind.
  338. Matters of taste are not, it turns out, moral issues.
  339. Just think: in all the clean, beautiful reaches of the solar system, our planet alone is a blot; our planet alone has death.
  340. It’s a little silly to finally learn how to write at this age. But I long ago realized I was secretly sincere.
  341. It makes more sense to write one big book – a novel or nonfiction narrative – than to write many stories or essays. Into a long, ambitious project you can fit or pour all you possess and learn.
  342. It is ironic that the one thing that all religions recognize as separating us from our creator, our very self-consciousness, is also the one thing that divides us from our fellow creatures. It was a bitter birthday present from evolution.
  343. If you’re going to publish a book, you probably are going to make a fool of yourself.
  344. I’m a housewife: I spend far more time on housework than anything else.
  345. I would like to learn, or remember, how to live.
  346. I worked so hard all my life, and all I want to do now is read.
  347. I woke in bits, like all children, piecemeal over the years. I discovered myself and the world, and forgot them, and discovered them again.
  348. I noticed this process of waking, and predicted with terrifying logic that one of these years not far away I would be awake continuously and never slip back, and never be free of myself again.
  349. I never met a man who was shaken by a field of identical blades of grass. An acre of poppies and a forest of spruce boggle no one’s mind.
  350. I can’t dance anymore. Total knee replacements. I can’t do anything anymore.
  351. How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.
  352. How can people think that artists seek a name? There is no such thing as an artist – only the world, lit or unlit, as the world allows.
  353. God gave me a talent to draw. I ‘owed’ it to him to develop the talent.
  354. Every book has an intrinsic impossibility, which its writer discovers as soon as his first excitement dwindles.
  355. Eskimo: ‘If I did not know about God and sin, would I go to hell?’ Priest: ‘No, not if you did not know.’ Eskimo: ‘Then why did you tell me?’
  356. Crystals grew inside rock like arithmetic flowers. They lengthened and spread, added plane to plane in an awed and perfect obedience to an absolute geometry that even stones – maybe only the stones – understood.
  357. Buddhism notes that it is always a mistake to think your soul can go it alone.
  358. At its best, the sensation of writing is that of any unmerited grace. It is handed to you, but only if you look for it.
  359. As soon as beauty is sought not from religion and love, but for pleasure, it degrades the seeker.
  360. As a life’s work, I would remember everything – everything, against loss. I would go through life like a plankton net.
  361. Appealing workplaces are to be avoided. One wants a room with no view, so imagination can meet memory in the dark.
  362. All my books started out as extravagant and ended up pure and plain.
  363. Aim for the chopping block. If you aim for the wood, you will have nothing. Aim past the wood, aim through the wood; aim for the chopping block.
  364. According to Inuit culture in Greenland, a person possesses six or seven souls. The souls take the form of tiny people scattered throughout the body.
  365. A writer looking for subjects inquires not after what he loves best, but after what he alone loves at all.
  366. A schedule defends from chaos and whim. It is a net for catching days. It is a scaffolding on which a worker can stand and labor with both hands at sections of time.
  367. ‘Fecundity’ is an ugly word for an ugly subject. It is ugly, at least, in the eggy animal world. I don’t think it is for plants.
  368. You don’t have to sort of enhance reality. There is nothing stranger than truth.
  369. When you go to take someone’s picture, the first thing they say is, what you want me to do? Everyone is very awkward.
  370. When you are younger, the camera is like a friend and you can go places and feel like you’re with someone, like you have a companion.
  371. When you are on assignment, film is the least expensive thing in a very practical sense. Your time, the person’s time, turns out to be the most valuable thing.
  372. When I take a picture I take 10 percent of what I see.
  373. When I started working for Rolling Stone, I became very interested in journalism and thought maybe that’s what I was doing, but it wasn’t.
  374. When I started working for Rolling Stone, I became very interested in journalism and thought maybe that’s what I was doing, but it wasn’t true. What became important was to have a point of view.
  375. When I say I want to photograph someone, what it really means is that I’d like to know them. Anyone I know I photograph.
  376. What has stayed true all the way through my work is my composition, I hope, and my sense of color.
  377. What I learned from Lennon was something that did stay with me my whole career, which is to be very straightforward. I actually love talking about taking pictures, and I think that helps everyone.
  378. What I end up shooting is the situation. I shoot the composition and my subject is going to help the composition or not.
  379. What I am interested in now is the landscape. Pictures without people. I wouldn’t be surprised if eventually there are no people in my pictures. It is so emotional.
  380. Those who want to be serious photographers, you’re really going to have to edit your work. You’re going to have to understand what you’re doing. You’re going to have to not just shoot, shoot, shoot. To stop and look at your work is the most important thing you can do.
  381. There were some advantages to being a woman photographer. I think women have more empathy with the subject.
  382. There must be a reason why photographers are not very good at verbal communication. I think we get lazy.
  383. There are still so many places on our planet that remain unexplored. I’d love to one day peel back the mystery and understand them.
  384. The work which is manipulated looks a little boring to me. I think life is pretty strange anyway. It is wooo, wooo, wooo!
  385. The pictures of my family were designed to be on a family wall, they were supposed to be together. It was supposed to copy my mother’s wall in her house.
  386. The camera makes you forget you’re there. It’s not like you are hiding but you forget, you are just looking so much.
  387. Sometimes I enjoy just photographing the surface because I think it can be as revealing as going to the heart of the matter.
  388. No one ever thought Clint Eastwood was funny, but he was.
  389. Nature is so powerful, so strong. Capturing its essence is not easy – your work becomes a dance with light and the weather. It takes you to a place within yourself.
  390. My lens of choice was always the 35 mm. It was more environmental. You can’t come in closer with the 35 mm.
  391. My hope is that we continue to nurture the places that we love, but that we also look outside our immediate worlds.
  392. Lennon was very helpful. What he taught me seems completely obvious: he expected people to treat each other well.
  393. It’s hard to watch something go on and be talking at the same time.
  394. It’s a heavy weight, the camera. Now we have modern and lightweight, small plastic cameras, but in the ’70s they were heavy metal.
  395. In a portrait, you have room to have a point of view. The image may not be literally what’s going on, but it’s representative.
  396. In a portrait, you have room to have a point of view and to be conceptual with a picture. The image may not be literally what’s going on, but it’s representative.
  397. If it makes you cry, it goes in the show.
  398. If I didn’t have my camera to remind me constantly, I am here to do this, I would eventually have slipped away, I think. I would have forgotten my reason to exist.
  399. I’ve never liked the word ‘celebrity.’ I like to photograph people who are good at what they do.
  400. I’ve learned to create a palette, a vocabulary of ways to take pictures.
  401. I’ve created a vocabulary of different styles. I draw from many different ways to take a picture. Sometimes I go back to reportage, to journalism.
  402. I’m more interested in being good than being famous.
  403. I’m a huge, huge fan of photography. I have a small photography collection. As soon as I started to make some money, I bought my very first photograph: an Henri Cartier-Bresson. Then I bought a Robert Frank.
  404. I’d like to think that the actions we take today will allow others in the future to discover the wonders of landscapes we helped protect but never had the chance to enjoy ourselves.
  405. I wish that all of nature’s magnificence, the emotion of the land, the living energy of place could be photographed.
  406. I went to school at the San Francisco Art Institute, thinking I was going to become an art teacher. Within the first six months I was there, I was told that I couldn’t be an art teacher unless I became an artist first.
  407. I went to Yosemite as an homage to Ansel Adams. I could never be Ansel Adams, but to know that’s there for us – there’s so much for us in this country.
  408. I was scared to do anything in the studio because it felt so claustrophobic. I wanted to be somewhere where things could happen and the subject wasn’t just looking back at you.
  409. I still need the camera because it is the only reason anyone is talking to me.
  410. I sometimes find the surface interesting. To say that the mark of a good portrait is whether you get them or get the soul – I don’t think this is possible all of the time.
  411. I shoot a little bit, maybe two rolls, medium format, which is 20 pictures, and if it’s not working, I change the position.
  412. I realized I couldn’t be a journalist because I like to take a side, to have an opinion and a point a view; I liked to step across the imaginary boundary of the objective view that the journalist is supposed to have and be involved.
  413. I personally made a decision many years ago that I wanted to crawl into portraiture because it had a lot of latitude.
  414. I fight to take a good photograph every single time.
  415. I fell in love with the darkroom, and that was part of being a photographer at the time. The darkroom was unbelievably sexy. I would spend all night in the darkroom.
  416. I feel very proud of the work from the ’80s because it is very bright and colorful.
  417. I feel a responsibility to my backyard. I want it to be taken care of and protected.
  418. I don’t think there is anything wrong with white space. I don’t think it’s a problem to have a blank wall.
  419. I didn’t want to let women down. One of the stereotypes I see breaking is the idea of aging and older women not being beautiful.
  420. I am impressed with what happens when someone stays in the same place and you took the same picture over and over and it would be different, every single frame.
  421. I admired the work of photographers like Beaton, Penn, and Avedon as much as I respected the grittier photographers such as Robert Frank. But in the same way that I had to find my own way of reportage, I had to find my own form of glamour.
  422. Everyone keeps asking you for pictures, and after a while you get tired of that. I always say, They are in the archives.
  423. Computer photography won’t be photography as we know it. I think photography will always be chemical.
  424. Coming tight was boring to me, just the face… it didn’t have enough information.
  425. At my Rolling Stones’ tour, the camera was a protection. I used it in a Zen way.
  426. As much as I’m not a journalist, I use journalism. And when you photograph a relationship, it’s quite wonderful to let something unfold in front of you.
  427. As a young person, and I know it’s hard to believe that I was shy, but you could take your camera, and it would take you to places: it was like having a friend, like having someone to go out with and look at the world. I would do things with a camera I wouldn’t do normally if I was just by myself.
  428. As I get older, the book projects are – liberating is one word, but they really are me.
  429. A very subtle difference can make the picture or not.
  430. A thing that you see in my pictures is that I was not afraid to fall in love with these people.
  431. You wouldn’t find a Joni Mitchell on ‘X Factor;’ that’s not the place. ‘X Factor’ is a specific thing for people that want to go through that process – it’s a factory, you know, and it’s owned and stitched-up by puppet masters.
  432. You know, I would say that songwriting is something about the expression of the heart, the intellect and the soul.
  433. You just decide what your values are in life and what you are going to do, and then you feel like you count, and that makes life worth living. It makes my life meaningful.
  434. You have to face things, have faith in what you do and go for it. Think, ‘What’s the worst that could happen?’
  435. Women’s issues have always been a part of my life. My goal is to bring the word ‘feminism’ back into the zeitgeist and reframe it.
  436. Women’s issues have always been a part of my life.
  437. Why are we not valuing the word ‘feminism’ when there is so much work to be done in terms of empowerment and emancipation of women everywhere?
  438. When you’re that successful, things have a momentum, and at a certain point you can’t really tell whether you have created the momentum or it’s creating you.
  439. When you go to Africa, and you see children, they’re usually barefoot, dirty and in rags, and they’d love to go to school.
  440. When you get to be nearly 60, you do take stock. You don’t know what’s around the corner.
  441. When I look at the majority of my own songs they really came from my own sense of personal confusion or need to express some pain or beauty – they were coming from a universal and personal place.
  442. Whatever you do, you do out of a passion.
  443. We all fight over what the label ‘feminism’ means but for me it’s about empowerment. It’s not about being more powerful than men – it’s about having equal rights with protection, support, justice. It’s about very basic things. It’s not a badge like a fashion item.
  444. Those in the developing world have so few rights – we take a lot for granted in the developed world.
  445. There’s a lot of women’s organisations, but they’re all working separately. If you get people together, as a collaborative voice, it’s strong.
  446. There is a big difference between what I do onstage and what I do in my private life. I don’t put my living room on magazine pages.
  447. There are two kinds of artists left: those who endorse Pepsi and those who simply won’t.
  448. The world is a heartbreaking place, without any question.
  449. The word feminism needs to be taken back. It needs to be reclaimed in a way that is inclusive of men.
  450. The person who inspired me the most was a friend of mine, Anita Roddick. I know that Anita wasn’t known to be an ardent feminist, but she truly was.
  451. The inner world is very potent for me – I don’t ascribe to any God or Jesus or Buddha – I just have a sense of it and revere it along with the natural world and human consciousness.
  452. The general population still thinks HIV is something that came in the 80s and went away, or that it only affects the gay population or intravenous drug users.
  453. The future hasn’t happened yet and the past is gone. So I think the only moment we have is right here and now, and I try to make the best of those moments, the moments that I’m in.
  454. The dynamic between two individuals starts off with everything warm and nice and fabulous and good. Working and living together can serve you quite well, but when it starts to go wrong – oh, boy!
  455. Pop stars are so busy having a career that they don’t really have a lot of time for activism.
  456. Please don’t ask me for the actual answer to anything, because I don’t have it. Because all I do is look at stuff and ask questions. What can I say? I just think the world’s barking mad. Look, I’m not an expert. I’m just an ordinary person.
  457. People ask me so many questions.
  458. Over the years, I was never really driven to become a solo artist, but I was curious to find out who I was as an individual creative person. It’s taken some time, but now I feel I’ve truly paid my dues. I guess I’m at a point now where I’m more comfortable in my own skin.
  459. Our ancestors are totally essential to our every waking moment, although most of us don’t even have the faintest idea about their lives, their trials, their hardships or challenges.
  460. One wouldn’t want to have the same dilemmas at 50 as one had at 15. And indeed I don’t. I have a very different take on life.
  461. Nelson Mandela is awe inspiring – a person who really sacrificed for what he believed in. I feel truly humbled by him.
  462. My issue with the state of women became incredibly stimulated when I was visiting developing countries and it became obvious that women bore the brunt of so many things in society.
  463. Music is an extraordinary vehicle for expressing emotion – very powerful emotions. That’s what draws millions of people towards it. And, um, I found myself always going for these darker places and – people identify with that.
  464. Music is a great vehicle for communications, and I have a certain platform. I have an opportunity and I have to take it.
  465. Motherhood was the great equaliser for me; I started to identify with everybody… as a mother, you have that impulse to wish that no child should ever be hurt, or abused, or go hungry, or not have opportunities in life.
  466. Motherhood was the great equaliser for me; I started to identify with everybody.
  467. Most women are dissatisfied with their appearance – it’s the stuff that fuels the beauty and fashion industries.
  468. Money is a good thing and it’s obviously useful, but to work only for money or fame would never interest me.
  469. Men need to understand, and women too, what feminism is really about.
  470. Making a Christmas album is looked upon by some people as the thing you do when you are heading towards retirement.
  471. Life is not quantifiable in terms of age, but I suppose in my fifties I am more grounded and more at ease in my own skin than when I was younger. I have a confidence that I didn’t have before from the experiences I’ve had.
  472. Life expectancy in many parts of Africa can be something around the age of thirty five to thirty eight. I mean you’re very fortunate if you live to that age. In fact when I went to Uganda for the first time one of the things that occurred to me was that I saw very few elderly people.
  473. It’s not fair to compare one artist to another because they all come with their own sort of elements to the picnic, you know.
  474. It’s hard to tell how far women’s individuality has come in the past twenty years.
  475. It’s a very telling thing when you have children. You have to be there for them, you’ve got to set an example, when you’re not sure what your example is, and anyway the world is changing so fast you don’t know what is appropriate anymore.
  476. In a sense, the music business and I haven’t always been the best of bedfellows. Artists often have to fight their corner. Your music goes through these filters of record labels and media, and you’re hoping you’ll find someone who’ll help you get your work into the world.
  477. If you want to open a supermarket chain and put your face all around the globe, selling your baby and your dog, if it makes you happy, who am I to disagree, as the song goes. But it’s not for me. I’ve always tried to keep my integrity and keep my autonomy.
  478. If we value what we’ve inherited for free – from other women – surely it’s right morally and ethically for us to wake up and say, ‘I’m a feminist. ‘
  479. If someone says something unpleasant, I can’t say it doesn’t smart a bit. It always does. Someone can take a really nasty swipe if they want because it kind of feels powerful for a person to write in a paper and get that thing out there.
  480. If people like your music, you can’t guarantee they’re going to love you.
  481. If I hadn’t been a singer, I might have been a photographer or an artist. But it’s singing I love. I sing all the time, and I feel really good that I’ve expressed myself.
  482. I’ve thought about what is an alternative word to feminism. There isn’t one. It’s a perfectly good word. And it can’t be changed.
  483. I’ve never experienced chronic poverty, but I know what it’s like to live on £3 a week.
  484. I’ve never been a social person. When I grew up, the other girls would all be combing their hair and exchanging lipstick, and I just couldn’t do that group thing.
  485. I’ve never been a social person.
  486. I’ve had my share of dark days of the soul. I try not to focus on it too much so it doesn’t get to me.
  487. I’ve always tried to keep my integrity and keep my autonomy.
  488. I’m not really keen on comebacks. Eurythmics was an incredible thing. When I look back on that work, I feel very satisfied with it.
  489. I’m not particularly attention-seeking.
  490. I’m not intensely private – I talk a great deal about my life and my work – I just don’t play the game to excess.
  491. I’m not a saint. I’m not an angel. I’m a human being.
  492. I’m not a Christian, but I think the Christian message is a good one.
  493. I’m just an ordinary person.
  494. I’m from a working-class background, and I’ve experienced that worry of not having a job next week because the unions are going on strike. I know that because I don’t come from a wealthy background.
  495. I’m from a working-class background, and I’ve experienced that worry of not having a job next week because the unions are going on strike.
  496. I’m appalled the word feminism has been denigrated to a place of almost ridicule and I very passionately believe the word needs to be revalued and reintroduced with power and understanding that this is a global picture.
  497. I’m a female but I have a masculine side and I’m not going to negate that part of myself.
  498. I’d rather support the issues I truly believe in than give my vote to parties that court votes at the time of the election. I like to think that my vote strengthens the green foundation stone.
  499. I wouldn’t say that I’ve mellowed. I’m less mellow, perhaps.
  500. I would say that although my music may be or may have been part of the cultural background fabric of the gay community, I consider myself an outsider who belongs everywhere and nowhere… Being a human being is what truly counts. That’s where you’ll find me.
  501. I would love to meet a dodo.
  502. I would like to see the gay population get on board with feminism. It’s a beautiful organisation and they’ve done so much. It seems to me a no-brainer.
  503. I will go out of my way to avoid the shopping crowds and the extreme consumerism – I hate all that.
  504. I watch ‘Mad Men,’ I knit scarves, I cook and am very, very normal. Honestly.
  505. I was perceiving myself as good as a man or equal to a man and as powerful and I wanted to look ambiguous because I thought that was a very interesting statement to make through the media. And it certainly did cause quite a few ripples and interest and shock waves.
  506. I was never much of a one to win prizes… and certainly never placed too much value on their acquisition.
  507. I was brought up in a tenement house in a working district. We didn’t even have a bathroom! We had a gaslight in the hallway and a black-and-white TV.
  508. I was born in 1954. My parents were brought up in the war years, and life was hard.
  509. I want to branch out. I want to write. I write poetry. I want to see my children grow up well.
  510. I want people to understand me as a person with views, not just performing songs.
  511. I want people to start thinking about what it means to be HIV-positive and to ask questions about that.
  512. I used to be obsessed about how I presented myself. I didn’t want other people dressing me because I didn’t want to be treated like a clothes horse.
  513. I understand what it is for a woman to want to protect their children and give them the best they can.
  514. I think people in Great Britain are a bit jaded sometimes.
  515. I think my daughters have a pretty healthy self-awareness but I can’t speak on their behalf.
  516. I think music is the most phenomenal platform for intellectual thought.
  517. I think life on the road really suits very egotistical men. It’s set up for kings.
  518. I think Scotland could take a stand in a wonderful way, ecologically and morally and ethically.
  519. I see myself as a traveller.
  520. I sang a lot as a little girl and entered competitions. I loved singing in choirs, but it was as I got older that I really found my voice.
  521. I only want to make music because I have a passion for it.
  522. I mean, I’m 48 years old and I’ve been through a lot in my life – you know, loss, whether it be death, illness, separation. I mean, the failed expectations… We all have dreams.
  523. I love to make music and stay grounded.
  524. I love to be individual, to step beyond gender.
  525. I like where I live here, in London.
  526. I haven’t lived my life through my daughters. Some parents devote everything to their children, which must be so hard, and it’s very beautiful. But I’m a working parent, so I’ve always kept my own life.
  527. I have different hats; I’m a mother, I’m a woman, I’m a human being, I’m an artist and hopefully I’m an advocate. All of those plates are things I spin all the time.
  528. I have always felt a little homeless. It’s a strange thing.
  529. I have always been a very visual person and a keen observer.
  530. I have a reputation for being cold and aloof, but I’m so not that woman. I’m passionate. I love my girls, being with my girlfriends, getting involved with issues that affect other women and children who are suffering.
  531. I have a lot to be grateful for.
  532. I have a calling in my soul, if you like, to try to make my life in some way worthwhile. What is the value of my existence?
  533. I enjoy multi-tasking, so I want to do a lot of different things. I want to keep all the plates spinning.
  534. I don’t want to be owned by a corporation and obliged to make a certain type of album. I want to be free.
  535. I don’t think feminism is about the exclusion of men but their inclusion… we must face and address those issues, especially to include younger men and boys.
  536. I don’t take myself as seriously as some people think, and I’d hate anyone to think I was preaching. That’s the last thing I want.
  537. I don’t have clear-cut positions. I get baffled by things. I have viewpoints. Sometimes they change.
  538. I don’t have any interest to go to Israel. I don’t think I’d ever have a cause to go.
  539. I don’t feel there are enough women artists out there who are saying anything of tremendous relevance.
  540. I didn’t want to be perceived as a girly girl on stage.
  541. I can’t understand why the front pages of newspapers can cover bird flu and swine flu and everybody is up in arms about that and we still haven’t really woken up to the fact that so many women in sub-Saharan Africa – 60 percent of people in – infected with HIV are women.
  542. I am fascinated by history and particularly the Victorian era.
  543. I am a communicator; that seems to be my natural place. And I’ll always be passionate about the world, because it’s so bonkers.
  544. I also started writing songs because I had this burning activity in my heart and had to express myself.
  545. Humankind seems to have an enormous capacity for savagery, for brutality, for lack of empathy, for lack of compassion.
  546. Having children, they’re not your property. They need to figure out their own views. I think my daughters have a pretty healthy self-awareness, but I can’t speak on their behalf.
  547. HIV/AIDS has no boundaries.
  548. For me, pointing and clicking my phone is absolutely fine. People say that isn’t the art of photography but I don’t agree.
  549. Feminism is a word that I identify with. The term has become synonymous with vitriolic man-hating but it needs to come back to a place where both men and women can embrace it. It is particularly important for women in developing countries.
  550. Fear paralyses you – fear of flying, fear of the future, fear of leaving a rubbish marriage, fear of public speaking, or whatever it is.
  551. Fame for fame’s sake is toxic – some people want that, with no boundaries. It’s unhealthy.
  552. Every artist has to make their own statements and they have to live with them.
  553. Dying is easy, it’s living that scares me to death.
  554. Churches, depending on their policy, can do fantastic work with people in the community.
  555. Charity is a fine thing if it’s meeting a gap where needs must be met and there are no other resources. But in the long term we need to support people into helping themselves.
  556. Ask yourself: Have you been kind today? Make kindness your daily modus operandi and change your world.
  557. As a mother, you have that impulse to wish that no child should ever be hurt, or abused, or go hungry, or not have opportunities in life.
  558. As a creative person, you just put something out into the consciousness of the society you live in.
  559. Anita Roddick was amazing. Her presence in a room was full of light, and everything she worked to achieve still resonates now.
  560. Although I have lived in London, I have never really considered London my home because it was always going to be a stopping-off point for me, and it has been too.
  561. Actually, I’m quite a domesticated person. I love the little things of home.
  562. A lot of music you might listen to is pretty vapid, it doesn’t always deal with our deeper issues. These are the things I’m interested in now, particularly at my age.
  563. You don’t take a photograph, you make it.
  564. Yosemite Valley, to me, is always a sunrise, a glitter of green and golden wonder in a vast edifice of stone and space.
  565. When words become unclear, I shall focus with photographs. When images become inadequate, I shall be content with silence.
  566. When I’m ready to make a photograph, I think I quite obviously see in my minds eye something that is not literally there in the true meaning of the word. I’m interested in something which is built up from within, rather than just extracted from without.
  567. We must remember that a photograph can hold just as much as we put into it, and no one has ever approached the full possibilities of the medium.
  568. Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop.
  569. To photograph truthfully and effectively is to see beneath the surfaces and record the qualities of nature and humanity which live or are latent in all things.
  570. These people live again in print as intensely as when their images were captured on old dry plates of sixty years ago… I am walking in their alleys, standing in their rooms and sheds and workshops, looking in and out of their windows. Any they in turn seem to be aware of me.
  571. There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept.
  572. There are worlds of experience beyond the world of the aggressive man, beyond history, and beyond science. The moods and qualities of nature and the revelations of great art are equally difficult to define; we can grasp them only in the depths of our perceptive spirit.
  573. There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.
  574. There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer.
  575. The only things in my life that compatibly exists with this grand universe are the creative works of the human spirit.
  576. The negative is the equivalent of the composer’s score, and the print the performance.
  577. The negative is comparable to the composer’s score and the print to its performance. Each performance differs in subtle ways.
  578. Sometimes I do get to places just when God’s ready to have somebody click the shutter.
  579. Some photographers take reality… and impose the domination of their own thought and spirit. Others come before reality more tenderly and a photograph to them is an instrument of love and revelation.
  580. Photography, as a powerful medium of expression and communications, offers an infinite variety of perception, interpretation and execution.
  581. Photography is more than a medium for factual communication of ideas. It is a creative art.
  582. Not everybody trusts paintings but people believe photographs.
  583. No man has the right to dictate what other men should perceive, create or produce, but all should be encouraged to reveal themselves, their perceptions and emotions, and to build confidence in the creative spirit.
  584. Myths and creeds are heroic struggles to comprehend the truth in the world.
  585. Millions of men have lived to fight, build palaces and boundaries, shape destinies and societies; but the compelling force of all times has been the force of originality and creation profoundly affecting the roots of human spirit.
  586. Landscape photography is the supreme test of the photographer – and often the supreme disappointment.
  587. It is my intention to present – through the medium of photography – intuitive observations of the natural world which may have meaning to the spectators.
  588. It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment.
  589. In wisdom gathered over time I have found that every experience is a form of exploration.
  590. In my mind’s eye, I visualize how a particular… sight and feeling will appear on a print. If it excites me, there is a good chance it will make a good photograph. It is an intuitive sense, an ability that comes from a lot of practice.
  591. I tried to keep both arts alive, but the camera won. I found that while the camera does not express the soul, perhaps a photograph can!
  592. Dodging and burning are steps to take care of mistakes God made in establishing tonal relationships.
  593. A true photograph need not be explained, nor can it be contained in words.
  594. A photograph is usually looked at – seldom looked into.
  595. A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed.
  596. A good photograph is knowing where to stand.
  597. You know what I’m realizing? I always love a place if I like the movie I’m doing there. I’ve heard people say, ‘I hate Pittsburgh,’ and I’m like, ‘I love Pittsburgh so much!’ I loved what I was doing there, and I loved Austin for the same reason.
  598. You can’t be a good actor if you get too affected by fame. Because then you’re not real, and you’re not really wanting more. You look at a lot of actors who, before they were famous, did a lot of amazing work, and once they got too big, it just got off.
  599. You can be really weird, and people will still accept you if you’re in movies. I’m not actually weird, but if I feel like being weird, then I can do it, and they accept it because you’re an actor.
  600. You are your main news platform, so no publication has as much power as you do about posting about yourself.
  601. With ‘Carrie,’ I did, like, seven auditions. I’d never done a movie, so they wanted to make sure I wasn’t going to ruin it. I don’t blame them.
  602. When you’re crafting a character, it’s good to have a lot of influences.
  603. When girls scream my name and start crying, I blush like crazy.
  604. When I was in lower school, I graduated from fourth grade, and the principal gave us a summer assignment to take a 30-minute reflection period every day. And, of course, there were no cell phones at the time. She said to just think. And that’s lost. It doesn’t exist anymore. Just imagine being on a couch and just thinking.
  605. When I chose to do ‘Carrie,’ I never had done anything on camera before. I was always onstage, so everything surprised me. Just going on set and walking into a makeup trailer and seeing Chloe Moretz and Julianne Moore – ‘Wow, I am part of this ensemble.’
  606. What’s interesting to me is the fact that creatively, I can do anything now and people will pay attention, and if I suck, hopefully they will stop paying attention very quickly, but if I’m good, then I have my foot in the door, and people have paid attention, and I did a good job, and people are like, ‘Oh, wow!’
  607. To be honest, I don’t mind talking about my experiences in life, but details aren’t for everyone.
  608. This is sort of not expected, but I would love to produce a record for Missy Elliott. It would be totally different, but she makes party music. ‘Lose Control’ was my favorite song when I was in 5th or 6th grade.
  609. There’s going to come a time when maybe I have kids and a wife.
  610. There are so many things to be lucky for. Lucky to be healthy, lucky to be, like, beautiful. Lucky to be living in America.
  611. There are big parts of my life that I don’t share. I don’t share myself eating dinner with my family. I don’t talk about who I’m dating. That’s private; that’s me.
  612. The image of myself that I give on social media isn’t actually who I am; it’s not 100 percent me, obviously.
  613. The first show I did was ‘The Nutcracker’ ballet. I was one of the kids who comes out in the beginning.
  614. The first movie I ever cried at was when I was 10 years old and saw ‘The Notebook’ in theaters. I was like, ‘Whoa, so weird. Crying at a movie? I’m not supposed to do that. So weird.’ I didn’t know that art could make you do that.
  615. The club scene is terrible.
  616. Technology moves so fast and social media moves so fast because everyone wants the new thing, but also, everyone wants to be where their parents are not. Once the mom got a Facebook and a Twitter and an Instagram, I don’t want to be there anymore.
  617. Sometimes you want to read what people write about you, obviously.
  618. Sometimes I’ll write a tweet that I’ll just be like, ‘Why do I have to say this to all of these people?’ It’s like writing a Facebook status: it’s the same. I view tweeting as like writing a Facebook status. Remember when we used to write statuses?
  619. Someone once told me we have in our minds who we want, and often those aren’t the people we actually want. Like, once there was a girl I thought was perfect for me – I had every box checked with her. But I just didn’t feel anything.
  620. Some nightlife places, people aren’t there for the music, and it’s depressing. I’m not just a club DJ; I am a producer, and I’ll only DJ when the crowd is there to enjoy the music.
  621. So many movies just have two pretty people thrown together.
  622. Picture-taking is an ensemble art – like theater.
  623. Parents can’t monitor what you are doing on Snapchat.
  624. Nicholas Sparks and John Green are very different writers.
  625. My thing with fans is, it’s always about being really good to them and taking the time to take every picture. If there are 300 people, you should take 300 pictures – you shouldn’t take 250 because then fifty people will go home sad. Why would you do that?
  626. My style is clubby and groovy – you can jump to it, but you don’t just have to just jump to it. It’s not just really bass-heavy and hurts your ears; you move with it, and it sounds kind of tribal.
  627. My mom is very romantic. As is my dad. They appreciate real romance.
  628. My fans are going to be there for me.
  629. My dad’s a photographer. So I suppose he named me Ansel just in case I would take over the family business. I guess I failed him.
  630. My dad was always taking photos of us at home, and even on set – he’d bring us along and stick us in the photos in the background. It was almost the beginning of acting for me, like, ‘Hey, you go over there and play basketball in the background, and don’t even think about the camera.’
  631. My dad said to always do what I loved and not worry about the money or anything, because if I do what I love, then the money will come.
  632. My dad photographed a lot of beautiful dancers. My mom was a dancer.
  633. My dad grew up in Washington Heights. I grew up in New York in Manhattan. So we’re purebred New Yorkers.
  634. Most actors nowadays are models turned actors. That’s why a lot of young actors are terrible. You have to learn how to act. It is not something that you can just do.
  635. LaGuardia High School is a place of acceptance. You have every type of kid there, performing. The outcast girl would not have been made fun of in my high school.
  636. Just in terms of the opportunity I’ve gotten is amazing. I consider myself super, super, super lucky.
  637. Just because you live 20 years or 100 years doesn’t make it less meaningful. They’re both short amount of times. So all we can do is just live in that time, whatever time we’re given.
  638. James Dean was always a tortured soul.
  639. It’s important to be a divergent musician and do a little bit of everything, except you have to make sure your fans are aware of it and that you string them along the right way.
  640. In fifth grade, I did ‘Oklahoma!,’ but I didn’t get a leading role. I knew the whole play and could sing it already, but they were like, ‘The sixth-grader has to get the lead.’ I was really discouraged.
  641. In ‘Divergent,’ the story is about Beatrice Prior, and I play her brother.
  642. If I messed up at the Oscars, I wouldn’t be invited back.
  643. I’m starting to get a following on Twitter. That’s a really awesome power to have. It gives me the opportunity to make any kind of art I want.
  644. I’m not that big of a reader, to be honest.
  645. I’m not really too worried about what I’m gonna do next, because I just think of my career as, like, having sixty years ahead of me.
  646. I’m not going to go on Twitter and rant about something.
  647. I’m looking forward to, as an actor, having to do some stuff that’s out of my comfort zone. It makes for interesting work and when you’re uncomfortable doing something; then it’s going to be interesting when they film it.
  648. I’m just such a good kisser.
  649. I’m a total goof. When I’m being really comfortable with my friends, I can be very goofy.
  650. I’m a physical guy. I play basketball, and I rock climb.
  651. I’ll work thirteen hours at a time producing a new track. Not a lot of people understand that – not girlfriends, friends, family.
  652. I’d like to be Gandalf for a day – he’s so wise, he’s so powerful, and he’s so caring. I love Gandalf. When they remake ‘Lord of The Rings,’ maybe I’ll play it.
  653. I write music because I love it. Sometimes more than anything in the world.
  654. I would like to do more independent films.
  655. I watched ‘Billy Madison’ maybe 80 times. It’s my favourite movie. Watched it, like, a million times. My brother and sister watched it with me all the time.
  656. I wanted to be a lot of things in my life.
  657. I want to play everything. I want to be like Christian Bale: I want to be able to be Batman and then, like, his character in ‘The Fighter.’ That is what is so impressive about really good actors, that they can be character actors and leading men at the same time.
  658. I want to encourage people. One of the things I do encourage people is that – that Internet is a place where we should share our ideas and be positive, not negative.
  659. I want to dunk on Kevin Hart.
  660. I want to do movies, television and theater. Whatever comes along.
  661. I think that when you first read material or you first read a script or story and know you might be playing a part, it’s important not to see yourself because it should be a challenge enough that it doesn’t come easy.
  662. I think that most people who are just artists, who are getting famous, would trade a lot of their fame back for some normalcy, pretty much immediately.
  663. I think my parents raised me well. And I’m pretty straight edge. All my friends make fun of me for being straight edge.
  664. I think it’s important I stay connected to every part of my personality. I play basketball. I rock climb. I paint. I’m a little bit scattered, but it’s so I can convincingly play all these characters.
  665. I think it would be ridiculous to work with Tom Hardy. I hear some crazy things about him, and he’s also really good.
  666. I think if you only work, then you won’t have a life. It’s tough to have a life when you’re working a lot.
  667. I think everyone should have social media – all young people, at least.
  668. I never really did that well in school because I was so absorbed with doing acting.
  669. I never felt fanboyish about acting, about actors, about movies. I’m a fanboy with music.
  670. I love when a girl is like, ‘I can’t hang out. I have to go to class.’ And I go pick her up, and she’s all sweaty in a leotard with her hair in a bun. That’s the hottest thing ever.
  671. I love to cry. It’s great.
  672. I love Marlon Brando and James Dean. That was when it was all about the star and the script. Nowadays, everything has to be action-packed.
  673. I like to go on really nice dates. I’ve made some money, but I don’t spend it on anything besides my rent. But I go to nice dinners. And I like to go with a girl.
  674. I like to buy girls shoes and jewelry. I buy stupidly expensive shoes. I got Louboutins for my mom and my girlfriend before. My mom was like, ‘I can’t wear these; they’re too high.’ I was like, ‘Mom, you have to try them – they’re so cool. They’re red snakeskin!’ She still wears them every so often, but she can’t walk in them.
  675. I like strong women. Physical women.
  676. I like romanticizing romance.
  677. I like romantic dates – going on a long walk in Central Park and then taking the subway downtown and going out to eat and ordering oysters. After that, you walk around again and talk.
  678. I just think a lot of people don’t give credit to EDM producers or DJs. People think they’re just button pushers and just get on stage and don’t really perform.
  679. I just make whatever music I want. It’s my obsession, and it’s very fulfilling.
  680. I have a lot of weird interests, but everything I do is artistic.
  681. I hated the ballet, but I liked performing. I did 20 shows, and I couldn’t get the smile off my face.
  682. I had a birthday party with my family and friends at a house, and Chipotle catered. It was beautiful.
  683. I grew up with Grace Coddington coming over to our house, like, all the time, but, like, she was just, like, the woman with the red hair.
  684. I go to dinner with my friends, and we’re like, ‘Let’s put our phones on airplane mode so we can really enjoy each other’s company.’
  685. I don’t want to only play the leading man for the rest of my career.
  686. I don’t want to just sell out shows to young girls who like my movie franchise. I want to sell tickets because people respect me.
  687. I don’t want to just fall back on the fact that I was on the cover of ‘GQ’ for being an actor.
  688. I don’t want money to ever drive my career. I want my career to be driven by what I want to do in art.
  689. I don’t want anyone part of my love life besides me and the person I’m loving.
  690. I don’t just act, and that’s really important to me. I don’t want to just be an actor forever.
  691. I don’t do that much sampling. I create all my own sounds.
  692. I don’t believe in spending money lavishly, now that I’m making money.
  693. I cry whenever I watch an emotional scene that I did, just because it brings me back to that moment. It’s like, I remember being there; I remember feeling what I felt. It’s really weird, right?
  694. I can tap dance a little bit.
  695. I can be overly confident at times, but with someone who I’m very close to, like with my mother, I will break down. In real life, people will find out that I’m not actually that confident and that I’m a real guy underneath it all.
  696. I always wanted to be part of a movie that creates a different world.
  697. I absolutely should be on social media, and I think every person who’s an influencer should be, and should be doing good things.
  698. Human beings are a wonderful virus in some ways.
  699. Growing up on, say, the Upper East Side, you’re so isolated. If you go to the Hamptons every weekend, you never talk to a construction worker, and the construction worker would never talk to you.
  700. Girls love it when you have some weird nerdy thing in your room. It makes you look less threatening, even though I’m, like, very threatening. I’m the most threatening guy ever.
  701. From an early age, I understood the concept that, if you’re not the star, then your job is to not pull attention away from the star.
  702. Even on Facebook, like, I wouldn’t share everything with my friends, because that’s obnoxious.
  703. As an actor, you want a director who makes you feel comfortable in a place that you can really create and try a lot of different things.
  704. Any real person has a front and a real part to themselves.
  705. All I want to do is work.
  706. A lot of high school students on TV and in Broadway are played by people in their late 20s and even early 30s. That seems weird to me.
  707. ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ is a beautiful film that’s really positive. The second half gets sad, but it’s always positive.
  708. ‘East of Eden’ is an important story for me. It’s about a kid that’s misunderstood and feels like he’s not loved by his father. It’s a very father-son kind of story, and it’s not until the end that they sort of make up. I like that because every boy has trouble with his father, so it’s very relatable.
  709. You’d have a hard time finding anything better than Barcelona for food, as far as being a hub. Given a choice between Barcelona and San Sebastian to die in, I’d probably want to die in San Sebastian.
  710. You learn a lot about someone when you share a meal together.
  711. You know, from age 17 on, my paycheck was coming from cooking and working in kitchens.
  712. You have an impeccable argument if you said that Singapore, Hong Kong, and Tokyo are food capitals. They have a maximum amount of great stuff to eat in the smallest areas.
  713. You can call me the bad boy chef all you want. I’m not going to freak out about it. I’m not that bad. I’m certainly not a boy, and it’s been a while since I’ve been a chef.
  714. When I’m doing a book tour in the States, I’ll wake up in the room sometimes in an anonymous chain hotel, and I don’t know where I am right away. I’ll go to the window, and it doesn’t help there either, especially if you’re in an anonymous strip and it’s the usual Victoria’s Secret, Gap, Chili’s, Applebee’s.
  715. When I’m back in New York – and this is a terrible thing to complain about – I eat a lot more really, really good food than perhaps I’d like to. So many of my friends are really good chefs. It’s kind of like being in the Mafia.
  716. When I was writing ‘Kitchen Confidential,’ I was in my 40s, I had never paid rent on time, I was 10 years behind on my taxes, I had never owned my own furniture or a car.
  717. What you’re going to be eating in the next year is decided by chefs. If the consensus is that pot-bellies are in next season, that’s what’s on your plate. And I think that’s a good thing, because we know, obviously, about food.
  718. What nicer thing can you do for somebody than make them breakfast?
  719. Understand, when you eat meat, that something did die. You have an obligation to value it – not just the sirloin but also all those wonderful tough little bits.
  720. Tokyo would probably be the foreign city if I had to eat one city’s food for the rest of my life, every day. It would have to be Tokyo, and I think the majority of chefs you ask that question would answer the same way.
  721. To the extent I am known, I think I am known as a person who expresses his opinion freely about things – and I was sensitive to the possibility that if I was seen taking money for saying nice things about a product, my comments and choices and opinions would become, understandably, suspect.
  722. To be treated well in places where you don’t expect to be treated well, to find things in common with people you thought previously you had very, very little in common with, that can’t be a bad thing.
  723. Those places I don’t understand, just doing bad food. It takes some doing. Making good pasta is so much easier than making bad stuff. It actually takes quite an effort to make poor linguine pomodora.
  724. There are people with otherwise chaotic and disorganized lives, a certain type of person that’s always found a home in the restaurant business in much the same way that a lot of people find a home in the military.
  725. The worst, most dangerous person to America is clearly Paula Deen.
  726. The notion that before you even set out to go to Thailand, you say, ‘I’m not interested,’ or you’re unwilling to try things that people take so personally and are so proud of and so generous with, I don’t understand that, and I think it’s rude. You’re at Grandma’s house, you eat what Grandma serves you.
  727. The fact that over 50 per cent of the residents of Toronto are not from Canada, that is always a good thing, creatively, and for food especially. That is easily a city’s biggest strength, and it is Toronto’s unique strength.
  728. The cooking profession, while it’s a noble craft and a noble calling, ’cause you’re doing something useful – you’re feeding people, you’re nurturing them, you’re providing sustenance – it was never pure.
  729. The celebrity-chef thing, even at its worst, its most annoying, its silliest, its goofiest, its most egregious and cynical, has been a good thing.
  730. The Kobe craze really annoyed me. Most of the practitioners had no real understanding of the product and were abusing it and exploiting it in terrible and ridiculous ways. Kobe beef should not be used in a hamburger. It’s completely pointless.
  731. The Italians and Spanish, the Chinese and Vietnamese see food as part of a larger, more essential and pleasurable part of daily life. Not as an experience to be collected or bragged about – or as a ritual like filling up a car – but as something else that gives pleasure, like sex or music, or a good nap in the afternoon.
  732. The Congo was the most difficult shoot of my life but was also maybe the greatest adventure of my life.
  733. Southeast Asia has a real grip on me. From the very first time I went there, it was a fulfillment of my childhood fantasies of the way travel should be.
  734. Sometimes the greatest meals on vacations are the ones you find when Plan A falls through.
  735. Since the very beginning, Emeril’s had a sense of humor about me calling him names and poking fun at him.
  736. People’s choice to become vegan, from people I’ve spoken to, seems motivated by fear.
  737. People are generally proud of their food. A willingness to eat and drink with people without fear and prejudice… they open up to you in ways that somebody visiting who is driven by a story may not get.
  738. One of the things is challenging yourself to do a Rome show when everybody’s done a Rome show. To find some aspect of food culture or chef culture that people can look at in a new way.
  739. One of life’s terrible truths is that women like guys who seem to know what they’re doing.
  740. Oh yes, there’s lots of great food in America. But the fast food is about as destructive and evil as it gets. It celebrates a mentality of sloth, convenience, and a cheerful embrace of food we know is hurting us.
  741. Nobody in Singapore drinks Singapore Slings. It’s one of the first things you find out there. What you do in Singapore is eat. It’s a really food-crazy culture, where all of this great food is available in a kind of hawker-stand environment.
  742. My mom had Julia Child and ‘The Fannie Farmer Cookbook’ on top of the refrigerator, and she had a small repertoire of French dishes.
  743. My house is run, essentially, by an adopted, fully clawed cat with a mean nature.
  744. My brain and body and nervous system, they see a plane ride, a long plane trip, as an opportunity to sleep with nothing coming in, nothing to do. I just go offline the minute I’m on the plane.
  745. Meals make the society, hold the fabric together in lots of ways that were charming and interesting and intoxicating to me. The perfect meal, or the best meals, occur in a context that frequently has very little to do with the food itself.
  746. Jiro Ono serves Edo-style traditional sushi, the same 20 or 30 pieces he’s been making his whole life, and he’s still unsatisfied with the quality and every day wakes up and trains to make the best. And that is as close to a religious experience in food as one is likely to get.
  747. It would be an egregious mistake to ever refer to me in the same breath as most of the people I write about.
  748. It just seems there’s better things to do in your life than be on television if it’s not interesting, if it’s not challenging, if it’s not fun. You know? When it stops being those things for me, I’ll stop making television.
  749. Is there a sharper commentary on American culture and the world than The Simpsons?
  750. In too much of the West, everyone wants the guarantee of safety, and never having to make any decisions.
  751. In college, I think I probably positioned myself as an aspiring writer, meaning I dressed sort of extravagantly and adopted all the semi-Byronic affectations, as if I were writing, although I wasn’t actually doing any writing.
  752. In America, there might be better gastronomic destinations than New Orleans, but there is no place more uniquely wonderful.
  753. If you’ve ever hauled a 28-pound two-year-old around New York, you’ll find that men fold at the knees a lot quicker than women.
  754. If you get an opportunity to work with David Simon, anybody with good taste would.
  755. If somebody crafts an interesting tweet that’ll lead me to their blog, I’m going to their blog.
  756. If anything is good for pounding humility into you permanently, it’s the restaurant business.
  757. If I’m in Rome for only 48 hours, I would consider it a sin against God to not eat cacio e pepe, the most uniquely Roman of pastas, in some crummy little joint where Romans eat. I’d much rather do that than go to the Vatican. That’s Rome to me.
  758. I, personally, think there is a really danger of taking food too seriously. Food should be part of the bigger picture.
  759. I’ve seen zero evidence of any nation on Earth other than Mexico even remotely having the slightest clue what Mexican food is about or even come close to reproducing it. It is perhaps the most misunderstood country and cuisine on Earth.
  760. I’ve sat in sushi bars, really fine ones, and I know how hard this guy worked, how proud he is. I know you don’t need sauce. I know he doesn’t even want you to pour sauce. And I’ve seen customers come in and do that, and I’ve seen him, as stoic as he tries to remain, I’ve seen him die a little inside.
  761. I’ve been really fortunate in that I guess I was hired to do ‘A Cook’s Tour;’ I was already a known quantity, meaning I had written a really obnoxious book and nobody expected me to be anyone that I wasn’t already.
  762. I’m very type-A, and many things in my life are about control and domination, but eating should be a submissive experience, where you let down your guard and enjoy the ride.
  763. I’m very proud of the Rome episode of ‘No Reservations’ because it violated all the conventional wisdom about making television. You’re never, ever supposed to do a food or travel show in black and white.
  764. I’m sure that at no point in my life could I ever have shown the kind of focus and discipline and commitment necessary to work a station at elBulli or Le Bernardin. No. That ain’t me.
  765. I’m really good at sleeping on planes. I mean, I smell jet fuel and I’m out; I’m asleep for takeoff.
  766. I’m not searching for hard news; I’m not a journalist, but I’m interested in pushing to boundaries of where we can do the kind of stories that we want to do. I mean, it’s a big world and CNN has made it a lot bigger and they haven’t flinched.
  767. I’m not looking to freak people out – eating rodents or bugs. I don’t do that anymore.
  768. I’m not besotted with the notion of being on CNN to the point that I’m going to suddenly morph into Anderson Cooper or Christiane Amanpour. I’m not a foreign correspondent.
  769. I’m not afraid to look like an idiot.
  770. I’m not afraid to look like a big, hairy, smelly, foreign devil in Tokyo, though I do my best not to, I really do.
  771. I’m not Ted Nugent. My house is run, essentially, by an adopted, fully clawed cat with a mean nature. I would never hunt. I would never wear fur. I would never go to a bullfight. I’m not really a meat and potatoes guy.
  772. I’m never a reliable narrator, unbiased or objective.
  773. I’m married to an Italian woman, and I used to love cooking Italian at home, because it’s one-pot cooking. But my wife does not approve of my Italian cooking.
  774. I’m evangelical on the subject of some chefs and writers.
  775. I’m definitely looking forward to the day when I stop working – if I ever stop working. I like the idea of keeling over in my tomato vines in Sardinia or northern Italy.
  776. I’m always secretly the most pleased when a show just really, really looks good and when my camera guys are really happy with the images they got.
  777. I’m a radical environmentalist; I think the sooner we asphyxiate in our own filth, the better. The world will do better without us. Maybe some fuzzy animals will go with us, but there’ll be plenty of other animals, and they’ll be back.
  778. I’m a pretty decent writer. It comes easy to me. I don’t agonize over sentences. I write like I talk. I try to make them good books.
  779. I’m a decent cook; I’m a decent chef. None of my friends would ever have hired me at any point in my career. Period.
  780. I’m a control freak. If you’re going to slap my name on something, I would like to control it.
  781. I’m a comic nerd. I’m a former serious collector for much of my childhood and early teen years I wanted to draw underground comics.
  782. I’m a Twitter addict. Jose Andres is a serial tweeter. It’s funny to see which chefs have embraced it, and the different paths they take.
  783. I would like to see people more aware of where their food comes from. I would like to see small farmers empowered. I feed my daughter almost exclusively organic food.
  784. I wish I could play bass like Larry Graham or Bootsy Collins. My God, I’d give up just about everything else for that.
  785. I wasn’t that great a chef, and I don’t think I’m that great a writer.
  786. I was a journeyman chef of middling abilities. Whatever authority I have as a commenter on this world comes from the sheer weight of 28 years in the business. I kicked around for 28 years and came out the other end alive and able to form a sentence.
  787. I try to very hard to avoid a situation where I would be eating cat or dog; I’ve managed to gracefully avoid that. It’s hypocritical of me and an arbitrary line, but one that I have managed to avoid crossing.
  788. I think that if all kids aspire to reach a point where they could feed themselves and a few of their friends, this would be good for the world surely.
  789. I think fine dining is dying out everywhere… but I think there will be – and there has to always be – room for at least a small number of really fine, old-school fine-dining restaurants.
  790. I often look ridiculous in Japan. There’s really no way to eat in Japan, particularly kaiseki in a traditional ryokan, without offending the Japanese horribly. Every gesture, every movement is just so atrociously wrong, and the more I try, the more hilarious it is.
  791. I make friends faster and easier than journalists.
  792. I love the masochistic aspect of eating seething, real Sichuan food in Sichuan Province.
  793. I love New York. I’m a guy for whom a New York accent is a comforting thing.
  794. I like the fact that Melbourne always seems to support their chefs and promote them in ways I find really admirable.
  795. I like telling stories, and I tell stories that interest me. It would be boring to have to go to nothing but the best restaurants. That would be a misery to me.
  796. I learned a long time ago that trying to micromanage the perfect vacation is always a disaster. That leads to terrible times.
  797. I just do the best I can and write something interesting, to tell stories in an interesting way and move forward from there.
  798. I hated the Naked Chef. Fine, yes, he did good things for school food or whatever, but, you know, I don’t want my chefs to be cute and adorable.
  799. I feel that if Jacques Pepin shows you how to make an omelet, the matter is pretty much settled. That’s God talking.
  800. I don’t think people should be encouraged to look like Kate Moss; I think that’s unreasonable. I think the normal human body should be glorified. By the same token, if you need a stick to wash yourself, you’re not healthy.
  801. I don’t snack. I don’t generally eat sweets or drink soda. I never eat between meals or even before big ones.
  802. I don’t like to see animals in pain. That was very uncomfortable to me. I don’t like factory farming. I’m not an advocate for the meat industry.
  803. I don’t have much patience for people who are self-conscious about the act of eating, and it irritates me when someone denies themselves the pleasure of a bloody hunk of steak or a pungent French cheese because of some outdated nonsense about what’s appropriate or attractive.
  804. I do not have a merchandise line. I don’t sell knives or apparel. Though I have been approached to endorse various products from liquor to airlines to automobiles to pharmaceuticals dozens of times, I have managed to resist the temptation.
  805. I do my very best to avoid shark fin.
  806. I did go into the Amazonian region of Brazil. They have prehistoric river fish that weigh in at around 600 pounds, which you don’t see anywhere else. And foods that cannot be exported or even found in other parts of Brazil.
  807. I could do one show after another in China for the rest of my life and still die ignorant. There’s a lot of places left to go.
  808. I could do nothing but Brooklyn shows for the rest of my career, and I could die ignorant.
  809. I can unload my opinion on anybody at anytime.
  810. I always entertain the notion that I’m wrong, or that I’ll have to revise my opinion. Most of the time that feels good; sometimes it really hurts and is embarrassing.
  811. Hong Kong is a wonderful, mixed-up town where you’ve got great food and adventure. First and foremost, it’s a great place to experience China in a relatively accessible way.
  812. Going to Southeast Asia for the first time and tasting that spectrum of flavors – that certainly changed my whole palate, the kind of foods I crave. A lot of the dishes I used to love became boring to me.
  813. Get up early and go to the local produce markets. In Latin America and Asia, those are usually great places to find delicious food stalls serving cheap, authentic and fresh specialties.
  814. For a dinner date, I eat light all day to save room, then I go all in: I choose this meal and this order, and I choose you, the person across from me, to share it with. There’s a beautiful intimacy in a meal like that.
  815. Food is everything we are. It’s an extension of nationalist feeling, ethnic feeling, your personal history, your province, your region, your tribe, your grandma. It’s inseparable from those from the get-go.
  816. Every chef I know, their cholesterol is through the roof. And mine’s not so great.
  817. Don’t dunk your nigiri in the soy sauce. Don’t mix your wasabi in the soy sauce. If the rice is good, complement your sushi chef on the rice.
  818. Doing graphic novels is cool! It’s fun! You get to write something, and then see it visually page by page, panel by panel, working with the artist, you get to see it fleshed out.
  819. Context and memory play powerful roles in all the truly great meals in one’s life.
  820. Chefs are fond of hyperbole, so they can certainly talk that way. But on the whole, I think they probably have a more open mind than most people.
  821. Big stuff and little: learning how to order breakfast in a country where I don’t speak the language and haven’t been before – that’s really satisfying to me. I like that.
  822. Being a vegan is a first-world phenomenon, completely self-indulgent.
  823. Barbecue may not be the road to world peace, but it’s a start.
  824. Bad food is made without pride, by cooks who have no pride, and no love. Bad food is made by chefs who are indifferent, or who are trying to be everything to everybody, who are trying to please everyone… Bad food is fake food… food that shows fear and lack of confidence in people’s ability to discern or to make decisions about their lives.
  825. At the end of the day, the TV show is the best job in the world. I get to go anywhere I want, eat and drink whatever I want. As long as I just babble at the camera, other people will pay for it. It’s a gift.
  826. As I see it, fast food outfits have targeted small children with their advertising in a very effective way. You know, it’s clowns and kid’s toys and bright colors and things like that.
  827. Anyone who’s a chef, who loves food, ultimately knows that all that matters is: ‘Is it good? Does it give pleasure?’
  828. Anyone who doesn’t have a great time in San Francisco is pretty much dead to me.
  829. An employer of mine back in the ’80s was kind enough to take me on after a rough patch, and it made a big difference in my life that I knew I was the sort of person who showed up on time. It’s a basic tell of character.
  830. ‘Kitchen Confidential’ wasn’t a cautionary or an expose. I wrote it as an entertainment for New York tri-state area line cooks and restaurant lifers, basically; I had no expectation that it would move as far west as Philadelphia.
  831. Women thrive on novelty and are easy meat for the commerce of fashion. Men prefer old pipes and torn jackets.
  832. When I first began to write fiction, I didn’t think I was a comic writer; I thought I was a serious writer. I was surprised when the first novel I wrote was regarded as a funny novel.
  833. We all need money, but there are degrees of desperation.
  834. Violence among young people is an aspect of their desire to create. They don’t know how to use their energy creatively so they do the opposite and destroy.
  835. To write is to become disinterested. There is a certain renunciation in art.
  836. The unconscious mind has a habit of asserting itself in the afternoon.
  837. The possession of a book becomes a substitute for reading it.
  838. The downtrodden are the great creators of slang.
  839. The country needs and, unless I mistake its temper, the country demands bold, persistent, experimentation. It is common sense to take a method and try it, if it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.
  840. Readers are plentiful: thinkers are rare.
  841. One of the delights known to age, and beyond the grasp of youth, is that of Not Going.
  842. Life is a wretched gray Saturday, but it has to be lived through.
  843. Laugh and the world laughs with you, snore and you sleep alone.
  844. It’s always good to remember where you come from and celebrate it. To remember where you come from is part of where you’re going.
  845. If you believe in an unseen Christ, you will believe in the unseen Christlike potential of others.
  846. I’m a natural clown, I suppose, in writing, and one has to accept that; I can’t do anything about it. I have written one or two novels which are not specifically funny. I wrote a study of Shakespeare which was not intended to be funny, but some people regard it as such.
  847. I went abroad to Malaya and came back and tended naturally to gravitate towards the south, I suppose, near London where things seemed to be going on; but I’m still a Lancashire man, and what I want to write someday is a novel about Manchester. Very much a regional novel.
  848. I enjoy journalism; anybody does. You see the results immediately; you’ve got an immediate audience instead of having to wait for your audience as you do if you’re writing a book, and you get a bit of money coming in, and you can see more clearly how you’re paying the bills. But it’s not a good position for the serious novelist to be in.
  849. I didn’t think; I experimented.
  850. He said it was artificial respiration, but now I find I am to have his child.
  851. Every dogma has its day.
  852. Books in a large university library system: 2,000,000. Books in an average large city library: 10,000. Average number of books in a chain bookstore: 30,000. Books in an average neighborhood branch library: 20,000.
  853. Bath twice a day to be really clean, once a day to be passably clean, once a week to avoid being a public menace.
  854. Americans will listen, but they do not care to read. War and Peace must wait for the leisure of retirement, which never really comes: meanwhile it helps to furnish the living room.
  855. A novelist should not be too intelligent either, although… he may be permitted to be an intellectual.
  856. You must stand for something! It does not have to be grand, but it must be a positive that brings light to someone else’s darkness.
  857. We have to replace our focus on personalities with a focus on ideas so that the opinionated and self-serving pronouncements and forms of cyber-bullying are replaced by thoughtful dialogue and open-minded conversation.
  858. We are the first to honour the memories of those who perished through slavery, by declaring August 1 as Emancipation Day.
  859. We all ran barefooted on the dusty roads in our past, but now the Emperor wears shoes, and it is our responsibility to ensure that the barefooted child and the doting mother are afforded a holistic environment to realise their dreams and ambitions.
  860. There is a continuous stream of opinions on governance issues expressed daily, not only in our Parliament and in the print media, but also on talk-radio and social media.
  861. The prominence given to our nation as a rainbow country has its genesis and credence in our ‘Calaloo culture’ of which our East Indian brothers and sisters have played a principal part.
  862. Social media websites are no longer performing an envisaged function of creating a positive communication link among friends, family and professionals. It is a veritable battleground, where insults fly from the human quiver, damaging lives, destroying self-esteem and a person’s sense of self-worth.
  863. Respect all manner of men regardless of their station in life. Compassion is one of the greatest virtues.
  864. Peace and security of our planet must be based on the collective action of all nations, not a few, however powerful they may be.
  865. Our traditional oil and gas philosophy does not have conservation as a crucial component, and we can ill afford to continue to spend billions of dollars which are not reflected in the improved human capital of our country.
  866. It is indeed fitting for me to make a comment to the effect that it takes a village to raise a child because I have lived in many villages down in deep south, and everyone there who played a part in my stewardship as a young man growing up and as a professional, they have given me unstinting support.
  867. It is important that you appreciate that the workplace must be a place of empowerment, but the empowerment must not only be connected to the job that you do.
  868. I’ve always believed that the artiste is the one who has his pulse on the society and who, in many ways, represents the conscience of society in terms of engaging standards that we need to live by.
  869. I sometimes detect that a type of regional divide is setting in, and there is a lack of real Caribbean connection among the islands, and I am concerned about this.
  870. I can recall, as a young adult, running through the rain forest at the Forest Reserve, at times feeling a sense of fear when I felt I was in danger. In danger of confronting an ugly snake or a coral snake, which represented the greatest fear of someone in a rural area when you traverse the forest.
  871. I am from the bush. The bush did not define me. I did not stay in the bush, but I never forgot where I came from.
  872. Humility is the armour that you clothe yourself with throughout your life. We demean each other rather than lift up ourselves.
  873. Globalisation must have, as a critical component, international dispensation in the locality of U.N. institutions. It cannot be, and must not be, business as usual in the establishment and location of international institutions, especially of the United Nations.
  874. Empowerment is not about doing the same thing the same way in the same environment. It’s about building the man and the woman and doing so with a view to creating better citizens and, by extension, better patriots in this society of ours.
  875. Don’t we realise that the student of today is the executive of tomorrow?
  876. Do not let where you come from define you, but never forget the values you learned from your close community.
  877. Change is the only constant, and to turn one’s back and pretend that it is not coming is an exercise in futility.
  878. As much as with increased exploration new gas reserves can be found, what must be obvious to all is that our oil and gas reserves are not renewable and they are diminishing, and to protect the generations to come, we must engage in nothing short of a radical shift in the diversification of the economy.
  879. Years ago I met Richard Burton in Port Talbot, my home town, and afterwards he passed in his car with his wife, and I thought, ‘I want to get out and become like him’. Not because of Wales, because I love Wales, but because I was so limited as a child at school and so bereft and lonely, and I thought becoming an actor would do that.
  880. Why love if losing hurts so much? I have no answers anymore; only the life I have lived. The pain now is part of the happiness then.
  881. What I do is just go over and over and over my lines and learn the script so well that I can just be easy and relaxed. That’s the way I always work.
  882. Well, everyone likes movies when they’re a little kid.
  883. We’re always looking over our shoulders, ‘what they will think, what the press will think, what will this one – am I making the right career move?’ When you’re young you have to do all that to survive, I suppose.
  884. We’re all caught up in circumstances, and we’re all good and evil. When you’re really hungry, for instance, you’ll do anything to survive. I think the most evil thing – well, maybe that’s too strong – but certainly a very evil thing is judgment, the sin of ignorance.
  885. We have a Boesendorfer piano that I play every day. It keeps my brain and my fingers active.
  886. We are dying from overthinking. We are slowly killing ourselves by thinking about everything. Think. Think. Think. You can never trust the human mind anyway. It’s a death trap.
  887. We all dream. We dream vividly, depending on our nature. Our existence is beyond our explanation, whether we believe in God or we have religion or we’re atheist.
  888. This industry has been really good to me. It’s been a great life. I’m not through yet. I’m ready when you are, Mr. DeMille.
  889. The magical, supernatural force that is with us every second is time. We can’t even comprehend it. It’s such an illusion, it’s such a strange thing.
  890. The knighthood was a tremendous honour, I don’t dismiss it. But I feel embarrassed by the flowery, theatrical stuff that goes with being an actor.
  891. The art of acting is not to act. Once you show them more, what you show them, in fact is bad acting.
  892. The Welsh people have a talent for acting that one does not find in the English. The English lack heart.
  893. Richard Burton came from the same town as me, so I thought I’d follow my nose, and follow my luck. I think I’ve been very lucky.
  894. Relish everything that’s inside of you, the imperfections, the darkness, the richness and light and everything. And that makes for a full life.
  895. People forget that Mozart wrote for commissions. There’s a thing in psychology where they think if it’s popular, it can’t be serious.
  896. People ask, ‘Should I call you Sir Hopkins?’ But I say, ‘No. Call me Tony,’ because it’s too much of a lift-up.
  897. Our existence is beyond our explanation, whether we believe in God or we have religion or we’re atheist. Our existence is beyond our understanding. No one has an answer.
  898. Once you begin to fall off the track and believe you breathe different air to everyone else, you’re doomed; you’re finished.
  899. Oh yes. I’m an actor, so I just learn my lines, and show up and do it. I gave it a little bit of thought.
  900. My weak spot is laziness. Oh, I have a lot of weak spots: cookies, croissants.
  901. My philosophy is: It’s none of my business what people say of me and think of me.
  902. My philosophy is it’s none of my business what people say of me and think of me. I am what I am, and I do what I do. I expect nothing and accept everything. And it makes life so much easier.
  903. My life turned out to be beyond my greatest dreams.
  904. My father wasn’t a cruel man. And I loved him. But he was a pretty tough character. His own father was even tougher – one of those Victorians, hard as iron – but my dad was tough enough.
  905. My father was grounded, a very meat-and-potatoes man. He was a baker.
  906. Life’s too short to deal with other people’s insecurities.
  907. Jonathan Demme is a very sharp editor of his movies.
  908. It’s such a pleasant surprise when you come on set and you find someone in charge like Ken Branagh or James Ivory. You know that you’re going to do a day’s work and at the end of it, it’s going to be good.
  909. It was a challenge, to work with Oliver Stone.
  910. In the theatre, people talk. Talk, talk until the cows come home about journeys of discovery and about what Hazlitt thought of a line of Shakespeare. I can’t stand it.
  911. If you do things, whether it’s acting or music or painting, do it without fear – that’s my philosophy. Because nobody can arrest you and put you in jail if you paint badly, so there’s nothing to lose.
  912. If I spent all my time criticising myself, I wouldn’t be able to function. There are actors who theorise till the cows come home. I haven’t the patience for them. It’s maybe shallow, but that’s why I’ll never be part of the acting set.
  913. I’ve had no contact with my daughter for years. That’s her choice. Anyway, you move on. If people don’t want to bother with me, fine. You know, God bless them, and move on.
  914. I’ve got no need to prove to myself that I can do Shakespeare. I’ve done it.
  915. I’ve got a great sense of humor.
  916. I’ve felt like an outsider all my life. It comes from my mother, who always felt like an outsider in my father’s family. She was a powerful woman, and she motivated my father.
  917. I’ve been composing music all my life and if I’d been clever enough at school I would like to have gone to music college.
  918. I’m the slowest driver in the world.
  919. I’m one of the slowest drivers on the road. I mosey along. If you’re doing anything too fast, including living life too fast, that creates sudden death. If I have to be somewhere on time, I make sure I leave early enough.
  920. I’m not a health freak. I just work out every day.
  921. I’m most suspicious of scripts that have a lot of stage direction at the top of the page… sunrise over the desert and masses of… a whole essay before you get to the dialogue.
  922. I’m married. My wife, Stella – a beautiful woman. She’s brought a lot of peace to my life, a lot of wisdom.
  923. I’m interested in the dream and subconscious mind, the peculiar dream-like quality of our lives, sometime nightmare quality of our lives.
  924. I’m fascinated by the fact that we can’t grasp anything about time.
  925. I’m devious, cruel, cunning and addictive.
  926. I’m always cast in these strange men… that’s not me, really.
  927. I’m a pretty tough guy, you know. I’m a pretty hard man. I’ve got a lot of compassion, but I don’t waste time with people.
  928. I wouldn’t use the word ‘scared’ for my role as Hitchcock, but it was my most insecure. Taking on such a formidable, giant personality such as Hitchcock; he was one of the great geniuses of world cinema. Sheer genius.
  929. I would like to go back to Wales. I’m obsessed with my childhood and at least three times a week dream I am back there.
  930. I worked with Steven Spielberg on Amistad… he seemed so very secure in himself that he let me do things.
  931. I worked with Lawrence Olivier some years ago. He was a great mentor.
  932. I worked at the Steel Company Of Wales when I was 17. My job was to supply tools to the guys working the blast furnaces.
  933. I was lousy in school. Real screwed-up. A moron. I was antisocial and didn’t bother with the other kids. A really bad student. I didn’t have any brains. I didn’t know what I was doing there. That’s why I became an actor.
  934. I was called ‘Dumbo,’ like the elephant, as a child because I couldn’t understand things at school.
  935. I was bullied as a boy – lots of kids are, but hopefully most of us get on with our lives and grow up.
  936. I tried acting, liked it, and stuck with it. I saw it as the way I would keep that promise to myself of getting back at those who had made my school life a misery.
  937. I think the healthy way to live is to make friends with the beast inside oneself, and that means not the beast but the shadow. The dark side of one’s nature. Have fun with it and you know, is to accept everything about ourselves.
  938. I think the first British actor who really worked well in cinema was Albert Finney. He was a back-street Marlon Brando. He brought a great wittiness and power to the screen. The best actor we’ve had.
  939. I think all those actors from that generation, like Bogart – they were wonderful actors. They didn’t act. They just came on and they did it, and the characters were wonderful.
  940. I think a certain amount of stress in life is good. The stress of just working, which takes effort – I think it keeps you going.
  941. I tend to get bored quickly, which means I must be boring.
  942. I spent two years in the military service, then I trudged around in repertory for quite a while. I somehow wound up at the National Theatre, though, and then I was definitely on my way.
  943. I remember coming to New York in 1974 to do a play here called ‘Equis.’ And I remember the first morning getting up and walking around the streets, and I thought, ‘I’m home.’ I felt really at peace here.
  944. I never make conscious decisions.
  945. I love roller coasters. I don’t get a chance often, but I’ve gone to Magic Mountain and gone on the rides. I love roller coasters.
  946. I love life because what more is there?
  947. I like to take it easy.
  948. I like the good life too much, I’m not good at going on stage night after night and on wet Wednesday afternoons.
  949. I learn poetry, learn text, and that really keeps you alive.
  950. I know that the arts are important. I’m not denying that, but I can’t associate myself with all the claptrap that goes on around it.
  951. I know that some actors and directors like to have intensity on set. I don’t, particularly. Certainly, if they want that, that’s fine, but I can’t work like that.
  952. I just wanted to be a composer; I became an actor by default, really. I got a scholarship to a college of music and drama, hoping to take a scholarship in music. But I ended up as an acting student, so I’ve stuck with that for the last 50-odd years.
  953. I hope I would not be so arrogant as to doubt anyone’s religion or belief.
  954. I have no interest in Shakespeare and all that British nonsense… I just wanted to get famous and all the rest is hogwash.
  955. I have dual citizenship; it just so happens I live in America. I would like to go back to Wales. I’m obsessed with my childhood, and at least three times a week dream I am back there.
  956. I have dual citizenship, it just so happens I live in America.
  957. I have a punishing workout regimen. Every day I do 3 minutes on a treadmill, then I lie down, drink a glass of vodka and smoke a cigarette.
  958. I don’t like freeloaders; I don’t like people who are negative.
  959. I don’t know why they gave me a knighthood – though it’s very nice of them – but I only ever use the title in the U.S. The Americans insist on it and get offended if I don’t.
  960. I don’t know what acting is, but I enjoy it.
  961. I don’t have people following me around, like bodyguards. I don’t know how people live like that. Maybe the young movie stars have to live like that, I don’t know. But it seems a little crazy to me. I don’t think you need all that stuff.
  962. I don’t have many friends; I’m very much a loner. As a child I was very isolated, and I’ve never been really close to anyone.
  963. I don’t have a vast longing for the stage.
  964. I don’t believe in nepotism. I don’t much like the idea of parents who interfere.
  965. I do admire Judi Dench and Sir Ian McKellen, but I’m a philistine. I like the good life too much; I’m not good at going on stage night after night and on wet Wednesday afternoons.
  966. I couldn’t say I ever dreamt of becoming a composer, a pianist, or anything else for that matter. I have the kind of brain where nothing is set in stone.
  967. I come from – I came from Wales, and it’s a strong, butch society. We were in the war and all that. People didn’t waste time feeling sorry for themselves. You had to get on with it. So my credo is get on with it. I don’t waste time being soft. I’m not cold, but I don’t like being, wasting my time with – life’s too short.
  968. I can’t stand directors who try to micro-manage everything. When it happens these days I just walk off set, saying if they don’t like the way I’m doing it they can get someone else.
  969. I came here in 1974 to do a play, and then I went to L.A. I really like living in America. I feel more at home here than anywhere else.
  970. I am not very good with relationships. With anyone. I can’t be locked up with anyone for too long.
  971. I am able to play monsters well. I understand monsters. I understand madmen.
  972. I am a bit of a solitude person – a solitary personality. I like being on my own. I don’t have any major friendships or relationships with people.
  973. I always had a knack for improvisation. I can write down the notes I play, but never really had a proper academic musical background. I suppose I’m blessed and cursed by the fact I have that freedom.
  974. For me, time is the greatest mystery of all. The fact is that we’re dreaming all the time. That’s what really gets me. We have a fathomless lake of unconsciousness just beneath our skulls.
  975. Every time I try to retire, or even think of retiring from acting, my agent comes up with a script.
  976. Beware the tyranny of the weak. They just suck you dry.
  977. And I love a scary movie. It makes your toes curl and it’s not you going through it.
  978. Actors I admire? Ed Harris, or course, I think he’s terrific; because I know he always had to fight being what he looked like a lot, but I think he’s a terrific actor.
  979. Acting is just a process of relaxation, actually. Knowing the text so well and trusting that the instinct and the subconscious mind, whatever you want to call it, is going to take over.
  980. A conductor can’t be too arrogant with an orchestra and try to impose himself too much.
  981. You must first get along with yourself before you can get along with others.
  982. You don’t have to hold a position in order to be a leader.
  983. You can learn a lot from people who view the world differently than you do.
  984. Without a sense of caring, there can be no sense of community.
  985. Wherever you go, no matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine.
  986. When you’re young, try to be realistic; as you get older, become idealistic. You’ll live longer.
  987. When solving problems, dig at the roots instead of just hacking at the leaves.
  988. Treasure your relationships, not your possessions.
  989. Transcend political correctness and strive for human righteousness.
  990. The rules have changed. True power is held by the person who possesses the largest bookshelf, not gun cabinet or wallet.
  991. The people who oppose your ideas are inevitably those who represent the established order that your ideas will upset.
  992. The only real failure in life is one not learned from.
  993. The most important things in life aren’t things.
  994. The greatest gift that you can give yourself is a little bit of your own attention.
  995. Smile, it is the key that fits the lock of everybody’s heart.
  996. Set high standards and few limitations for yourself.
  997. Run to meet the future or it’s going to run you down.
  998. Realize that if you have time to whine and complain about something then you have the time to do something about it.
  999. Reality doesn’t bite, rather our perception of reality bites.
  1000. Promise yourself to live your life as a revolution and not just a process of evolution.