1. I think that people are interested seeing me on the screen.
  2. I think that gay marriage should be between a man and a woman.
  3. I think Americans are very patriotic.
  4. I speak directly to the people, and I know that the people of California want to have better leadership. They want to have great leadership. They want to have somebody that will represent them. And it doesn’t matter if you’re a Democrat or a Republican, young or old.
  5. I saw a woman wearing a sweatshirt with Guess on it. I said, Thyroid problem?
  6. I made my fair share of mistakes.
  7. I know a lot of athletes and models are written off as just bodies. I never felt used for my body.
  8. I knew I was a winner back in the late sixties. I knew I was destined for great things. People will say that kind of thinking is totally immodest. I agree. Modesty is not a word that applies to me in any way – I hope it never will.
  9. I just use my muscles as a conversation piece, like someone walking a cheetah down 42nd Street.
  10. I have plenty of money, unlike other Hollywood celebrities or athletes that have not invested well.
  11. I have inhaled, exhaled everything.
  12. I have a private plane. But I fly commercial when I go to environmental conferences.
  13. I have a love interest in every one of my films: a gun.
  14. I had this child, and it destroyed my family.
  15. I feel good because I believe I have made progress in rebuilding the people’s trust in their government.
  16. I don’t suffer of anything that I’ve lost.
  17. I do the same exercises I did 50 years ago and they still work. I eat the same food I ate 50 years ago and it still works.
  18. I didn’t leave bodybuilding until I felt that I had gone as far as I could go. It will be the same with my film career. When I feel the time is right, I will then consider public service. I feel that the highest honor comes from serving people and your country.
  19. I can promise you that when I go to Sacramento, I will pump up Sacramento.
  20. I came to Hollywood and within a decade I was one of the biggest action stars of all time.
  21. I believe with all my heart that America remains ‘the great idea’ that inspires the world. It is a privilege to be born here. It is an honor to become a citizen here. It is a gift to raise your family here, to vote here, and to live here.
  22. I am the most helpful and open up doors for everyone and I like to share.
  23. I am a big believer in education, because when I grew up in Austria – when I grew up in Austria I had a great education. I had great teachers.
  24. Help others and give something back. I guarantee you will discover that while public service improves the lives and the world around you, its greatest reward is the enrichment and new meaning it will bring your own life.
  25. Gray Davis can run a dirty campaign better than anyone, but he can’t run a state.
  26. Government’s first duty and highest obligation is public safety.
  27. Freedom is a right ultimately defended by the sacrifice of America’s servicemen and women.
  28. For me life is continuously being hungry. The meaning of life is not simply to exist, to survive, but to move ahead, to go up, to achieve, to conquer.
  29. For 20 years, Simon & Schuster asked me, ‘Why don’t you write your autobiography?’
  30. Failure is not an option. Everyone has to succeed.
  31. Everything I have, my career, my success, my family, I owe to America.
  32. Even with my divorce and with everything, I don’t need money.
  33. Bodybuilding is much like any other sport. To be successful, you must dedicate yourself 100% to your training, diet and mental approach.
  34. As you know, I’m an immigrant. I came over here as an immigrant, and what gave me the opportunities, what made me to be here today, is the open arms of Americans. I have been received. I have been adopted by America.
  35. As president, Reagan worked very well with Democrats to do big things. It is true that he worked to reduce the size of government and cut federal taxes and he eliminated many regulations, but he also raised taxes when necessary.
  36. As long as I live, I will never forget that day 21 years ago when I raised my hand and took the oath of citizenship. Do you know how proud I was? I was so proud that I walked around with an American flag around my shoulders all day long.
  37. And now, of course this is another thing I didn’t count on, that now as the governor of the state of California, I am selling California worldwide. You see that? Selling.
  38. ‘I’ll be back’ always sounded a little girly to me.
  39. Young players need freedom of expression to develop as creative players… they should be encouraged to try skills without fear of failure.
  40. You cannot say that you are happy when you don’t win.
  41. When you look at people who are successful, you will find that they aren’t the people who are motivated, but have consistency in their motivation.
  42. We didn’t think he would play on Sunday because he was suspended – that makes me think he has all the qualities to join Arsenal!
  43. The moral values I’ve learnt in my life I’ve learnt through football.
  44. The communist model does not work economically, we all realised that, but the capitalist model in the modern world also looks to be unsustainable.
  45. The best football players in the world still earn very little money compared to people who really earn money.
  46. Some are wrong because they are not strong enough to fight temptation and some some are wrong because they do not know.
  47. Sol has experience, pace and physical power, which nobody else has together.
  48. Private life is private life. Off the pitch, there is private life, and the rest is social life, where of course you have to behave responsibly.
  49. People who work make the world live better and to reward these people well is normal. Yet they are not the people who are the wealthiest.
  50. Of the nine red cards this season we probably deserved half of them.
  51. Of course, we also have the responsibility to win games and the difficulty in the job is to combine both.
  52. My target is to make the players as rich as possible within the financial constraints of the club. My target is not to give them less money. I’m happy to make them rich.
  53. It’s silly to work hard the whole week and then spoil it by not preparing properly before the game.
  54. In some ways England is more liberal than France, but I also find it more intrusive. But when you go abroad you have to accept the ways of where you live. I have to respect that.
  55. In a competitive world, not everybody can follow the pace; you will leave people out. We now accept that we must take care of these people. You cannot let them die in the streets; people will not accept it. And that is right, too.
  56. If you have the money and you find the one player who can make you win and make the difference, no matter how expensive he is, you should do it. But there are not many players in the world who will make a real difference.
  57. If you do not believe you can do it then you have no chance at all.
  58. I think training of better Youth Coaches is essential.
  59. I think in the future we need to look at our youth department to provide more players for the first team think it is important for a club to have a good amount of players that have roots with the club and region.
  60. I think in England you eat too much sugar and meat and not enough vegetables.
  61. I think generally the Japanese players have more intensity in practice but generally I do the same things.
  62. I believe the target of anything in life should be to do it so well that it becomes an art.
  63. I believe one of the best things about managing people is that we can influence lives in a positive way. That’s basically what a manager is about. When I can do that, I am very happy.
  64. I believe in work, in connections between the players, I think what makes football great is that it is a team sport. You can win in different ways, by being more of a team, or by having better individual players. It is the team ethic that interests me, always.
  65. I am, of course, delighted but there was never any doubt about Sol staying.
  66. I also think we live in a competitive world, and I love competition.
  67. He made the impossible possible.
  68. For me, motivation is a person who has the capability to recruit the resources he needs to achieve a goal.
  69. Football is an art, like dancing is an art – but only when it’s well done does it become an art.
  70. English players are as easy to coach. The problem is that the Premier League has the best players in the world, and statistically not all of them can be born in England. But we don’t have enough English players: we are working very hard on it.
  71. At a young age winning is not the most important thing… the important thing is to develop creative and skilled players with good confidence.
  72. As a coach you can influence the diet of your players. You can point out what is wrong.
  73. As a club, we have an educational purpose: to give back to those people who love Arsenal so that they learn moral values from our game and how we behave.
  74. A manager is a guide. He takes a group of people and says, ‘With you I can make us a success; I can show you the way.’
  75. You can watch TV and see experts of all different colours and hues. But the minute you get past nine o’clock and you’re in primetime drama land, it’s like entering another world, one that doesn’t reflect the diversity of the society that we have in Britain in 2016.
  76. When will we get a female director-general of the BBC? Where is the colour when you go further up the food chain? It disappears.
  77. When we were discussing ‘Holby City, ‘I told the producers that I wanted the Art Malik character to be honourable, and my other requirement was that he be a Muslim, because we need Muslims on TV.
  78. When we did ‘The Jewel In The Crown,’ we filmed in India first so the actors had an idea of what the heat was like, what it did to you – it slows you down; it’s weighty: the air that you breathe is full of humidity. You are aware of the fact that you’re not in a studio in Manchester.
  79. When I was 13, I decided I was British and was going to stay that way.
  80. We all understand loss. It’s about what you do with that.
  81. Today, loss is something everybody feels. It could be the loss of a friend moving away. It could be your best friend moves to the other side of town or his family does. It’s a loss.
  82. To see the difference between when I came to Britain in 1955 with what it is today, to see how the sub-continent has been embraced, it is quite extraordinary.
  83. There was so much racism when I was a kid, but it was also ignorant.
  84. There are certain things that I know I don’t want to do anymore. Playing out-and-out terrorists who terrorise people and don’t actually move the conversation on are not worth doing. So that’s probably another reason I don’t go back to America, because a lot of it is like that. It’s boring, dull, very lazy writing.
  85. The easiest bit is when you’re talking. It’s listening that is so difficult. If you get out any Spencer Tracy film, you think, ‘Wow, he’s doing nothing, yet he’s doing everything.’
  86. The bagel budget for ‘Sex and the City 2’ could pay for ‘Ghosted.’
  87. Stick a camera up in an Indian village, and thousands of people come to watch.
  88. Not until somebody turns round and says, ‘Art, how do you fancy playing Charles Dickens? How do you fancy playing Prince Charles in this biopic?’ Until those movements come, then no, we haven’t got past anything.
  89. My work is really simple. They say ‘action,’ I do my stuff; they say, ‘cut!’
  90. My own mother is very accomplished and makes things like bahar breads as though they are going out of fashion – they are like stuffed parathas and can contain anything from potatoes to poppy seeds.
  91. My idea of a great holiday is not to go out. It’s to find somewhere where I’m not confronted by people coming up to me and saying, ‘You’re Art Malik, aren’t you?’ It’s quite nice sometimes not to be recognised.
  92. My all time favourite films – one is ‘Mary Poppins,’ and the other one is ‘Pakeezah.’ ‘Pakeezah’ was an Indian film. The beauty of ‘Pakeezah’ was that it had a soundtrack which was pure poetry.
  93. Most families are dysfunctional.
  94. If people ever stop making films about India, I’d never work again.
  95. I’ve had a fantastic career playing great parts. In many ways, the colour of my skin has been an asset because I’ve been asked to play certain roles as a result. I don’t apologise for playing them anymore than Robert de Niro is sorry for playing American-Italians.
  96. I’m not a practising Muslim.
  97. I’m lucky: I’ve got great photogenic eyes. You’re up and running if you’ve got that and one brain cell to attach it to.
  98. I’m a grandfather now, and when I watch children’s shows with my two-year-old grandson, Arlo, I’m delighted because it’s completely non-traditional casting. It feels like a utopia. How the world should be.
  99. I would like to go to Iceland to see the northern lights.
  100. I was lucky enough to be launched into the marketplace with the blessing of a series like ‘Jewel.’
  101. I was doing ‘Homeland’ and read the first two episodes, and all I wanted was episode three to know what would happen next.
  102. I questioned the blind faith demanded by my religion, which was Islam.
  103. I love listening to music on holiday, and back in the old days, I used to travel with cassette tapes and a boombox.
  104. I jumped at the chance of doing ‘Holby.’ It’s a great show.
  105. I hope to work in Indian films again. I would love to.
  106. I have therapy. Every day. I read a bit of Freud; I try to be a better person. Every day.
  107. I have no idea whether I’m any good or not. Still waiting, like most actors, for somebody to find out one day that I can’t do it.
  108. I grew up in the Fifties and Sixties and remember how unpleasant all kinds of food could be then.
  109. I grew up in a Britain where ‘Paki-bashing’ was around in my late teens from the National Front. We also had ‘Pakis Go Home,’ and even ‘Jewel In The Crown’ attracted this sort of comment.
  110. I grew up in Balham in south London, and my best friend’s brother was Geoffrey Robinson, who of course later became paymaster general, but at that time, he was working in politics.
  111. I do sometimes cook myself, and I do enjoy it, though it does depend what’s in the fridge, and filming can mean I don’t have much time.
  112. I decided to go and find India on my own. So, I hired a cab for a drive round old Delhi. I was knocked off center by the sheer energy that goes into daily survival.
  113. I always think it’s kind of fun to get to the airport early, check in, and then go and have a meal before getting on the plane.
  114. How can you turn down Marks and Gran? Their scripts are so rich in texture.
  115. Having portrayed English-speaking Indian characters in British and American projects, I have always wanted to use my mother tongue in an Indian film.
  116. Am I overjoyed when somebody says, ‘Oh, we’re going to do another Jane Austen?’ No – because there’s never anything in it for me.
  117. Acting’s a job. I act to fill the fridge.
  118. ‘True Lies’ reinvented me in the eyes of a new generation and got me offers.
  119. You’ve got to get to the stage in life where going for it is more important than winning or losing.
  120. You learn about equality in history and civics, but you find out life is not really like that.
  121. When we were together, I loved you deeply and you gave me so much happiness I can never repay you.
  122. When bright young minds can’t afford college, America pays the price.
  123. We must reach out our hand in friendship and dignity both to those who would befriend us and those who would be our enemy.
  124. We must believe in the power of education. We must respect just laws. We must love ourselves, our old and or young, our women as well as our men.
  125. Trust has to be earned, and should come only after the passage of time.
  126. True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others at whatever cost.
  127. There is a syndrome in sports called ‘paralysis by analysis.’
  128. The ideal attitude is to be physically loose and mentally tight.
  129. Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.
  130. Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can.
  131. One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.
  132. My potential is more than can be expressed within the bounds of my race or ethnic identity.
  133. Let me put it this way: I think Republicans tend to keep the ball in play, Democrats go for broke.
  134. Later, I discovered there was a lot of work to being good in tennis.
  135. If you’re paid before you walk on the court, what’s the point in playing as if your life depended on it?
  136. If I were to say, ‘God, why me?’ about the bad things, then I should have said, ‘God, why me?’ about the good things that happened in my life.
  137. I may not be walking with you all the way, or even much of the way, as I walk with you now.
  138. I keep sailing on in this middle passage. I am sailing into the wind and the dark. But I am doing my best to keep my boat steady and my sails full.
  139. I have tried to keep on with my striving because this is the only hope I have of ever achieving anything worthwhile and lasting.
  140. I have always drawn strength from being close to home.
  141. I guess I started too early because I just thought it was something fun to do.
  142. I don’t want to be remembered for my tennis accomplishments.
  143. I don’t care who you are, you’re going to choke in certain matches. You get to a point where your legs don’t move and you can’t take a deep breath. You start to hit the ball about a yard wide, instead of inches.
  144. I accepted the face that as much as I want to lead others, and love to be around other people, in some essential way, I am something of a loner.
  145. From what we get, we can make a living; what we give, however, makes a life.
  146. Do not feel sorry for me if I am gone.
  147. Clothes and manners do not make the man; but when he is made, they greatly improve his appearance.
  148. A wise person decides slowly but abides by these decisions.
  149. When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
  150. We have to abandon the idea that schooling is something restricted to youth. How can it be, in a world where half the things a man knows at 20 are no longer true at 40 – and half the things he knows at 40 hadn’t been discovered when he was 20?
  151. This is the first age that’s ever paid much attention to the future, which is a little ironic since we may not have one.
  152. There is hopeful symbolism in the fact that flags do not wave in a vacuum.
  153. The only way to discover the limits of the possible is to go beyond them into the impossible.
  154. The limits of the possible can only be defined by going beyond them into the impossible.
  155. The intelligent minority of this world will mark 1 January 2001 as the real beginning of the 21st century and the Third Millennium.
  156. The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
  157. The best measure of a man’s honesty isn’t his income tax return. It’s the zero adjust on his bathroom scale.
  158. Sometimes I think we’re alone in the universe, and sometimes I think we’re not. In either case the idea is quite staggering.
  159. Reading computer manuals without the hardware is as frustrating as reading sex manuals without the software.
  160. Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories.
  161. Perhaps, as some wit remarked, the best proof that there is Intelligent Life in Outer Space is the fact it hasn’t come here. Well, it can’t hide forever – one day we will overhear it.
  162. Our lifetime may be the last that will be lived out in a technological society.
  163. New ideas pass through three periods: 1) It can’t be done. 2) It probably can be done, but it’s not worth doing. 3) I knew it was a good idea all along!
  164. It may be that our role on this planet is not to worship God – but to create him.
  165. It is not easy to see how the more extreme forms of nationalism can long survive when men have seen the Earth in its true perspective as a single small globe against the stars.
  166. It has yet to be proven that intelligence has any survival value.
  167. If an elderly but distinguished scientist says that something is possible, he is almost certainly right; but if he says that it is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
  168. I have a fantasy where Ted Turner is elected President but refuses because he doesn’t want to give up power.
  169. I don’t pretend we have all the answers. But the questions are certainly worth thinking about.
  170. I don’t believe in astrology; I’m a Sagittarius and we’re skeptical.
  171. I don’t believe in God but I’m very interested in her.
  172. Human judges can show mercy. But against the laws of nature, there is no appeal.
  173. How inappropriate to call this planet Earth when it is quite clearly Ocean.
  174. Every revolutionary idea seems to evoke three stages of reaction. They may be summed up by the phrases: 1- It’s completely impossible. 2- It’s possible, but it’s not worth doing. 3- I said it was a good idea all along.
  175. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
  176. You will, I am sure, agree with me that… if page 534 only finds us in the second chapter, the length of the first one must have been really intolerable.
  177. Women are naturally secretive, and they like to do their own secreting.
  178. Where there is no imagination there is no horror.
  179. When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
  180. When a doctor does go wrong he is the first of criminals. He has nerve and he has knowledge.
  181. We can’t command our love, but we can our actions.
  182. Violence does, in truth, recoil upon the violent, and the schemer falls into the pit which he digs for another.
  183. To the man who loves art for its own sake, it is frequently in its least important and lowliest manifestations that the keenest pleasure is to be derived.
  184. There is nothing more unaesthetic than a policeman.
  185. There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.
  186. The most difficult crime to track is the one which is purposeless.
  187. The lowest and vilest alleys of London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.
  188. The ideal reasoner, he remarked, would, when he had once been shown a single fact in all its bearings, deduce from it not only all the chain of events which led up to it but also all the results which would follow from it.
  189. Some facts should be suppressed, or, at least, a just sense of proportion should be observed in treating them.
  190. Sir Walter, with his 61 years of life, although he never wrote a novel until he was over 40, had, fortunately for the world, a longer working career than most of his brethren.
  191. Our ideas must be as broad as Nature if they are to interpret Nature.
  192. Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.
  193. Of all ghosts the ghosts of our old loves are the worst.
  194. Nothing clears up a case so much as stating it to another person.
  195. My mind rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me the most abstruse cryptogram, or the most intricate analysis, and I am in my own proper atmosphere. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for mental exaltation.
  196. Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius.
  197. London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained.
  198. It is an old maxim of mine that when you have excluded the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.
  199. It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data.
  200. It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.
  201. I never guess. It is a shocking habit destructive to the logical faculty.
  202. I have seen too much not to know that the impression of a woman may be more valuable than the conclusion of an analytical reasoner.
  203. I have frequently gained my first real insight into the character of parents by studying their children.
  204. I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose.
  205. How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?
  206. His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge.
  207. From a drop of water a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other.
  208. For strange effects and extraordinary combinations we must go to life itself, which is always far more daring than any effort of the imagination.
  209. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.
  210. Circumstantial evidence is occasionally very convincing, as when you find a trout in the milk, to quote Thoreau’s example.
  211. As a rule, said Holmes, the more bizarre a thing is the less mysterious it proves to be. It is your commonplace, featureless crimes which are really puzzling, just as a commonplace face is the most difficult to identify.
  212. As Cuvier could correctly describe a whole animal by the contemplation of a single bone, so the observer who has thoroughly understood one link in a series of incidents should be able to accurately state all the other ones, both before and after.
  213. Any truth is better than indefinite doubt.
  214. A trusty comrade is always of use; and a chronicler still more so.
  215. A man should keep his little brain attic stocked with all the furniture that he is likely to use, and the rest he can put away in the lumber-room of his library, where he can get it if he wants it.
  216. A client is to me a mere unit, a factor in a problem.
  217. You specialize in something until one day you find it is specializing in you.
  218. You cannot catch a child’s spirit by running after it; you must stand still and for love it will soon itself return.
  219. Without alienation, there can be no politics.
  220. Where choice begins, Paradise ends, innocence ends, for what is Paradise but the absence of any need to choose this action?
  221. What is the most innocent place in any country? Is it not the insane asylum? These people drift through life truly innocent, unable to see into themselves at all.
  222. Well, all the plays that I was trying to write were plays that would grab an audience by the throat and not release them, rather than presenting an emotion which you could observe and walk away from.
  223. The theater is so endlessly fascinating because it’s so accidental. It’s so much like life.
  224. The structure of a play is always the story of how the birds came home to roost.
  225. The problem was to sustain at any cost the feeling you had in the theater that you were watching a real person, yes, but an intense condensation of his experience, not simply a realistic series of episodes.
  226. The number of elements that have to go into a hit would break a computer down. the right season for that play, the right historical moment, the right tonality.
  227. The job is to ask questions-it always was-and to ask them as inexorably as I can. And to face the absence of precise answers with a certain humility.
  228. The closer a man approaches tragedy the more intense is his concentration of emotion upon the fixed point of his commitment, which is to say the closer he approaches what in life we call fanaticism.
  229. The apple cannot be stuck back on the Tree of Knowledge; once we begin to see, we are doomed and challenged to seek the strength to see more, not less.
  230. Never fight fair with a stranger, boy. You’ll never get out of the jungle that way.
  231. Maybe all one can do is hope to end up with the right regrets.
  232. Man must shape his tools lest they shape him.
  233. Let you look sometimes for the goodness in me, and judge me not.
  234. It is my art. I am better at it than I ever was. And I will do it as long as I can. When you reach a certain age you can slough off what is unnecessary and concentrate on what is. And why not?
  235. In the theater, while you recognized that you were looking at a house, it was a house in quotation marks. On screen, the quotation marks tend to be blotted out by the camera.
  236. If I see an ending, I can work backward.
  237. If I have any justification for having lived it’s simply, I’m nothing but faults, failures and so on, but I have tried to make a good pair of shoes. There’s some value in that.
  238. I’m the end of the line; absurd and appalling as it may seem, serious New York theater has died in my lifetime.
  239. I think now that the great thing is not so much the formulation of an answer for myself, for the theater, or the play-but rather the most accurate possible statement of the problem.
  240. I think it’s a mistake to ever look for hope outside of one’s self.
  241. I love her too, but our neuroses just don’t match.
  242. I know that my works are a credit to this nation and I dare say they will endure longer than the McCarran Act.
  243. I have made more friends for American culture than the State Department. Certainly I have made fewer enemies, but that isn’t very difficult.
  244. I cannot sleep for dreaming; I cannot dream but I wake and walk about the house as though I’d find you coming through some door.
  245. He’s not the finest character that ever lived. But he’s a human being, and a terrible thing is happening to him. So attention must be paid.
  246. He wants to live on through something-and in his case, his masterpiece is his son. all of us want that, and it gets more poignant as we get more anonymous in this world.
  247. Everybody likes a kidder, but nobody lends him money.
  248. Don’t be seduced into thinking that that which does not make a profit is without value.
  249. Certainly the most diverse, if minor, pastime of literary life is the game of Find the Author.
  250. Can anyone remember love? It’s like trying to summon up the smell of roses in a cellar. You might see a rose, but never the perfume.
  251. Betrayal is the only truth that sticks.
  252. All we are is a lot of talking nitrogen.
  253. A suicide kills two people, Maggie, that’s what it’s for!
  254. A playwright lives in an occupied country. And if you can’t live that way you don’t stay.
  255. A good newspaper, I suppose, is a nation talking to itself.
  256. A child’s spirit is like a child, you can never catch it by running after it; you must stand still, and, for love, it will soon itself come back.
  257. With people of limited ability modesty is merely honesty. But with those who possess great talent it is hypocrisy.
  258. Will power is to the mind like a strong blind man who carries on his shoulders a lame man who can see.
  259. Will minus intellect constitutes vulgarity.
  260. Wicked thoughts and worthless efforts gradually set their mark on the face, especially the eyes.
  261. Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame.
  262. We forfeit three-quarters of ourselves in order to be like other people.
  263. We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success.
  264. Treat a work of art like a prince. Let it speak to you first.
  265. To live alone is the fate of all great souls.
  266. To free a person from error is to give, and not to take away.
  267. To find out your real opinion of someone, judge the impression you have when you first see a letter from them.
  268. To buy books would be a good thing if we also could buy the time to read them.
  269. They tell us that suicide is the greatest piece of cowardice… that suicide is wrong; when it is quite obvious that there is nothing in the world to which every man has a more unassailable title than to his own life and person.
  270. There is no doubt that life is given us, not to be enjoyed, but to be overcome; to be got over.
  271. There is no absurdity so palpable but that it may be firmly planted in the human head if you only begin to inculcate it before the age of five, by constantly repeating it with an air of great solemnity.
  272. The word of man is the most durable of all material.
  273. The wise have always said the same things, and fools, who are the majority have always done just the opposite.
  274. The two enemies of human happiness are pain and boredom.
  275. The more unintelligent a man is, the less mysterious existence seems to him.
  276. The man never feels the want of what it never occurs to him to ask for.
  277. The longer a man’s fame is likely to last, the longer it will be in coming.
  278. The greatest of follies is to sacrifice health for any other kind of happiness.
  279. The greatest achievements of the human mind are generally received with distrust.
  280. The fundament upon which all our knowledge and learning rests is the inexplicable.
  281. The first forty years of life give us the text; the next thirty supply the commentary on it.
  282. The doctor sees all the weakness of mankind; the lawyer all the wickedness, the theologian all the stupidity.
  283. The discovery of truth is prevented more effectively, not by the false appearance things present and which mislead into error, not directly by weakness of the reasoning powers, but by preconceived opinion, by prejudice.
  284. The difficulty is to try and teach the multitude that something can be true and untrue at the same time.
  285. The brain may be regarded as a kind of parasite of the organism, a pensioner, as it were, who dwells with the body.
  286. The alchemists in their search for gold discovered many other things of greater value.
  287. Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.
  288. Suffering by nature or chance never seems so painful as suffering inflicted on us by the arbitrary will of another.
  289. Sleep is the interest we have to pay on the capital which is called in at death; and the higher the rate of interest and the more regularly it is paid, the further the date of redemption is postponed.
  290. Satisfaction consists in freedom from pain, which is the positive element of life.
  291. Religion is the masterpiece of the art of animal training, for it trains people as to how they shall think.
  292. Reading is equivalent to thinking with someone else’s head instead of with one’s own.
  293. Rascals are always sociable, more’s the pity! and the chief sign that a man has any nobility in his character is the little pleasure he takes in others’ company.
  294. Politeness is to human nature what warmth is to wax.
  295. Patriotism, when it wants to make itself felt in the domain of learning, is a dirty fellow who should be thrown out of doors.
  296. Opinion is like a pendulum and obeys the same law. If it goes past the centre of gravity on one side, it must go a like distance on the other; and it is only after a certain time that it finds the true point at which it can remain at rest.
  297. Obstinacy is the result of the will forcing itself into the place of the intellect.
  298. Newspapers are the second hand of history. This hand, however, is usually not only of inferior metal to the other hands, it also seldom works properly.
  299. Nature shows that with the growth of intelligence comes increased capacity for pain, and it is only with the highest degree of intelligence that suffering reaches its supreme point.
  300. National character is only another name for the particular form which the littleness, perversity and baseness of mankind take in every country. Every nation mocks at other nations, and all are right.
  301. Music is the melody whose text is the world.
  302. Money is human happiness in the abstract; he, then, who is no longer capable of enjoying human happiness in the concrete devotes himself utterly to money.
  303. Men are by nature merely indifferent to one another; but women are by nature enemies.
  304. Martyrdom is the only way a man can become famous without ability.
  305. Just remember, once you’re over the hill you begin to pick up speed.
  306. Journalists are like dogs, when ever anything moves they begin to bark.
  307. It’s the niceties that make the difference fate gives us the hand, and we play the cards.
  308. It is with trifles, and when he is off guard, that a man best reveals his character.
  309. It is only at the first encounter that a face makes its full impression on us.
  310. It is only a man’s own fundamental thoughts that have truth and life in them. For it is these that he really and completely understands. To read the thoughts of others is like taking the remains of someone else’s meal, like putting on the discarded clothes of a stranger.
  311. It is in the treatment of trifles that a person shows what they are.
  312. It is a clear gain to sacrifice pleasure in order to avoid pain.
  313. In the sphere of thought, absurdity and perversity remain the masters of the world, and their dominion is suspended only for brief periods.
  314. In our monogamous part of the world, to marry means to halve one’s rights and double one’s duties.
  315. In action a great heart is the chief qualification. In work, a great head.
  316. If you want to know your true opinion of someone, watch the effect produced in you by the first sight of a letter from him.
  317. If we were not all so interested in ourselves, life would be so uninteresting that none of us would be able to endure it.
  318. I’ve never known any trouble than an hour’s reading didn’t assuage.
  319. Honor means that a man is not exceptional; fame, that he is. Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.
  320. Honor has not to be won; it must only not be lost.
  321. Hatred is an affair of the heart; contempt that of the head.
  322. Great minds are related to the brief span of time during which they live as great buildings are to a little square in which they stand: you cannot see them in all their magnitude because you are standing too close to them.
  323. Great men are like eagles, and build their nest on some lofty solitude.
  324. Friends and acquaintances are the surest passport to fortune.
  325. For an author to write as he speaks is just as reprehensible as the opposite fault, to speak as he writes; for this gives a pedantic effect to what he says, and at the same time makes him hardly intelligible.
  326. Every possession and every happiness is but lent by chance for an uncertain time, and may therefore be demanded back the next hour.
  327. Every person takes the limits of their own field of vision for the limits of the world.
  328. Every parting gives a foretaste of death, every reunion a hint of the resurrection.
  329. Every nation ridicules other nations, and all are right.
  330. Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world.
  331. Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.
  332. Compassion is the basis of morality.
  333. Change alone is eternal, perpetual, immortal.
  334. Buying books would be a good thing if one could also buy the time to read them in: but as a rule the purchase of books is mistaken for the appropriation of their contents.
  335. Boredom is just the reverse side of fascination: both depend on being outside rather than inside a situation, and one leads to the other.
  336. Because people have no thoughts to deal in, they deal cards, and try and win one another’s money. Idiots!
  337. As the biggest library if it is in disorder is not as useful as a small but well-arranged one, so you may accumulate a vast amount of knowledge but it will be of far less value than a much smaller amount if you have not thought it over for yourself.
  338. Almost all of our sorrows spring out of our relations with other people.
  339. All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.
  340. After your death you will be what you were before your birth.
  341. A man’s face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man’s thoughts and aspirations.
  342. A man’s delight in looking forward to and hoping for some particular satisfaction is a part of the pleasure flowing out of it, enjoyed in advance. But this is afterward deducted, for the more we look forward to anything the less we enjoy it when it comes.
  343. A man can do what he wants, but not want what he wants.
  344. A man can be himself only so long as he is alone, and if he does not love solitude, he will not love freedom, for it is only when he is alone that he is really free.
  345. You have come to a stage where you almost have to work on yourself. You know, on finding some tranquility with which to respond to these things, because I realize that the biggest risk that many of us run is beginning to get inured to the horrors.
  346. You begin to realize that hypocrisy is not a terrible thing when you see what overt fascism is compared to sort of covert, you know, communal politics which the Congress has never been shy of indulging in.
  347. Years of imprisoning and beheading writers never succeeded in shutting them out. However, placing them in the heart of a market and rewarding them with a lot of commercial success, has.
  348. When you say things like, ‘We have to wipe out the Taliban,’ what does that mean? The Taliban is not a fixed number of people. The Taliban is an ideology that has sprung out of a history that, you know, America created anyway.
  349. When I decided to write ‘The God of Small Things’, I had been working in cinema. It was almost a decision to downshift from there. I thought that 300 people would read it. But it created a platform of trust.
  350. Torture has been privatized now, so you have obviously the whole scandal in America about the abuse of prisoners and the fact that, army people might be made to pay a price, but who are the privatized torturers accountable too?
  351. Today, we seem to be striving towards injustice, applauding it as though it’s a worthy dream, made sacred by the caste system.
  352. To me, there is nothing higher than fiction. Nothing. It is fundamentally who I am. I am a teller of stories. For me, that’s the only way I can make sense of the world, with all the dance that it involves.
  353. To call someone like me a writer-activist suggests that it’s not the job of a writer to write about the society in which they live. But it used to be our job.
  354. There can be nothing more humiliating for a writer of fiction to have to do than restate a case that has already been made.
  355. There are people who have comfortable relationships with power and people with natural antagonism to power. I think it’s easy to guess where I am in that.
  356. The mullahs of the Islamic world and the mullahs of the Hindu world and the mullahs of the Christian world are all on the same side. And we are against them all.
  357. The fact is that America’s weapons systems have made it impossible for anybody to confront it militarily. So, all you have is your wits and your cunning, and your ability to fight in the way the Iraqis are fighting.
  358. The amassing of unfettered wealth of individuals and corporations should stop. The inheritance of rich people’s wealth by their children should stop. The expropriators should have their wealth expropriated and redistributed.
  359. The Occupy movement found places where people who were feeling that anger could come and share it – and that is, as we all know, extremely important in any political movement. The Occupy sites became a way you could gauge the levels of anger and discontent.
  360. The Congress has historically played covert communal politics in order to create what in India we call vote banks where you pit one community against another and so on in order to secure votes.
  361. Sometimes I think the world is divided into those who have a comfortable relationship with power and those who have a naturally adversarial relationship with power.
  362. Some writers like to boil down headlines of liberal newspapers into fiction, so they say there shouldn’t be communal riots, everybody should love each other, there shouldn’t be boundaries or fundamentalism. But I think literature is more than that; these are political views which most of us hold anyway.
  363. Pity the nation that has to silence its writers for speaking their minds.
  364. Novels are such mysterious and amorphous and tender things.
  365. My mother is like a character who escaped from the set of a Fellini film. She’s a whole performing universe of her own. Activists would run a mile from her because they could not deal with what she is.
  366. In a way, writing is an incredible act of individualism, producing your language, and yet to use it from the heart of a crowd as opposed to as an individual performance is a conflicting thing. I do stand alone, and yet it’s not about being an individual or being ambitious.
  367. In California, there are huge problems because of dams. I’m against big dams, per se, because I think that they are economically unfeasible. They’re ecologically unsustainable. And they’re hugely undemocratic.
  368. If you ask me what is at the core of what I write, it isn’t about ‘rights’, it’s about justice. Justice is a grand, beautiful, revolutionary idea.
  369. If we were to lose the ability to be emotional, if we were to lose the ability to be angry, to be outraged, we would be robots. And I refuse that.
  370. I’m not ambitious. I don’t want to get anywhere, I don’t want anything more. I sometimes think that for me that is the real freedom, that I don’t want anything. I don’t want money or prizes. I want people to know that a war is going to be fought.
  371. I’m living to the edges of my fingernails, using everything I have. It’s impossible for me to look at things politically or in any way as a project, to further my career. You’re injected directly into the blood of the places in which you’re living and what’s going on there.
  372. I’m a social cripple in a cocktail party. My idea of a nightmare is people standing very elegantly dressed in a room with a drink in their hand. I’m just like, ‘Urghh!’
  373. I would never, ever use a novel to do thinly disguised political information dissemination. For me, all these experiences, they sat in me, and they got broken down into my body, and I sweated it out. It’s not because I want to talk about ‘issues.’ For me, a novel is a way of seeing the world.
  374. I think the kind of landscape that you grew up in, it lives with you. I don’t think it’s true of people who’ve grown up in cities so much; you may love a building, but I don’t think that you can love it in the way that you love a tree or a river or the colour of the earth; it’s a different kind of love.
  375. I think people ease into this careerist professionalism, so if you’re a writer it’s your job to manufacture books as opposed to writing them and to go to festivals and spend your life emotionally invested in reviews or the awards. You have to shrink your universe in a way. To me, it’s the opposite.
  376. I think one of the saddest things that’s happening to literature is that it’s getting over-simplified by this diet of simple political ideas.
  377. I think many people were surprised by the victory of the Congress, because it was really hard to see beyond the sort of haze of hatred that the Hindu nationalists had been spreading.
  378. I never, ever decided that I had to write a novel because, to me, there’s no such decision that ought to be made. It’s only something that I felt compelled to do, and it began to evolve.
  379. I kind of resent the idea that the whole world has to be interested in the American elections.
  380. I have truly known what it means for a writer to feel loved.
  381. I have nothing against romance. I believe that we must hold on to the right to dream and to be romantic. But an Indian village is not something that I would romanticize that easily.
  382. I don’t want to play these games of statistics any more; I have done that. I don’t want to be imprisoned by that, or by the morality that is expected of activists. I have never been that pristine person, that role model.
  383. I do what I do, and write what I write, without calculating what is worth what and so on. Fortunately, I am not a banker or an accountant. I feel that there is a time when a political statement needs to be made and I make it.
  384. I could have lived anywhere in the world now if I wanted to.
  385. I am very conscious that, from the time of ‘The God of Small Things’ was published 10 years ago, we are in a different world… which needs to be written about differently, and I really very much want to do that.
  386. I am a Maoist sympathiser. I’m not a Maoist ideologue, because the communist movements in history have been just as destructive as capitalism.
  387. For many people, the family is portrayed as the settled place of reasonable safety, but as anyone who has read ‘The God of Small Things’ would know, for me it was a dangerous place. I felt humiliated in that space. I wanted to get away as soon as I could.
  388. Fiction is too beautiful to be about just one thing. It should be about everything.
  389. Everyone thinks I live alone, but I don’t. My characters all live with me.
  390. Everybody can’t have the life of a normal, average American person in India – they can’t. So, it’s about egalitarianism. It’s about sharing things more equally. It’s about access to natural resources.
  391. Do you think that the people of South Africa, or anywhere on the continent of Africa, or India, or Pakistan are longing to be kicked around all over again?
  392. Democracy no longer means what it was meant to. It has been taken back into the workshop. Each of its institutions has been hollowed out, and it has been returned to us as a vehicle for the free market, of the corporations. For the corporations, by the corporations.
  393. Caste is about dividing people up in ways that preclude every form of solidarity, because even in the lowest castes, there are divisions and sub-castes, and everyone’s co-opted into the business of this hierarchical, silo-ised society.
  394. As a writer, I have to go to a different place now. As a person… I want to step off whatever this stage is that I have been given. The argument has been made, the battle remains to be fought – and that requires a different set of skills.
  395. Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.
  396. All my books are accidental books – they come from reacting to things and thinking about things and engaging in a real way. They are not about, ‘Oh, did it get a good review in the Guardian?’ I don’t care.
  397. You’ve got to exfoliate, you know?
  398. You ready? I have gold teeth, I have braids, I’m wearing Rick Owens moon boots, I have rips in my denim, a biker vest, I love artsy girls, my favourite artists are Jimi Hendrix and John Lennon. I’m obsessed with being different.
  399. With clothes, I like mixing what different designers do until it becomes a personal expression of how I’m feeling that day.
  400. There was a time when someone would get on a plane and request to move their seat just because the person sitting next to them was of a different ethnicity or religion or nationality. But I don’t think my generation wants that. That’s how it used to be.
  401. The thing with me is if I feel disrespected I won’t hesitate to fight. But it takes a lot to make me feel disrespected.
  402. Sometimes I forget that I’m supposed to keep people entertained because I’m just making music for my lifestyle and for my people who live my lifestyle. We forget that there’s a world waiting on us.
  403. Sometimes I feel like what’s hard for fashion designers to do is take looks from off the runway and actually put it into existence, into reality. That’s really the hard part.
  404. So for me, fashion was about standing out as an individual – and it helped me get the attention that most people try to get with publicity stunts or by doing other crazy things. But I just let the attention come to me naturally, and I think some of that has to do with my fashion.
  405. Purple lipstick? Naw, that looks stupid on all girls!
  406. On ‘Phoenix,’ I talk about thoughts of suicide and my whole life. It’s called ‘Phoenix’ because it’s talking about dying – but when a phoenix dies, it’s reborn from its own ashes. I related to that.
  407. Nowadays, everybody wanna be weird. We know how to manifest being weird.
  408. New York gave me hell for that ‘Purple Swag,’ man. They didn’t respect me until ‘Peso.’
  409. My real name’s Rakim – my parents named me after the god MC himself.
  410. Man, if you’re gay we can be friends. If you’re straight, we can be friends. I’m not gay, I don’t plan on being gay, I don’t condone it and I’m not sayin’ I’m against it.
  411. It would be disrespectful to take my stardom and bully my way into the fashion industry.
  412. It bring a tear to my eye to see native New York people give me my props because New York is stubborn and arrogant.
  413. In Harlem, I got all my black friends. But when I go downtown, I got black, white, Asian, Indian friends. There’s no borders, no barriers.
  414. If a chick wants to know who makes my shoes, she’s got to take them off my feet and look inside.
  415. I’m the CEO of A$AP Worldwide. But as you can see, when I’m with them, everybody’s equal. We don’t really base our love off of finances or who’s superior by financial status. We’re all equal. When I’m with them, I’m letting them shine ’cause it’s just like how it used to be. They still there. I’m just chilling out front.
  416. I’m starting to find out that a lot of people that you wouldn’t think listen to me really do.
  417. I’m not the best at choosing what’s good and what’s bad. I wouldn’t even know what’s a good pop song and what’s a bad one. With that said, I wanted to say what’s true to me. Some people might say that the Skrillex record was pop, but that was just about the chemistry between me and my boy.
  418. I’m not saying that hip-hop needs gay rappers or anything, but they need to stop being so close-minded because that will just cause the genre to fail. Look at pop. Pop doesn’t discriminate against people. Look at Lady Gaga, y’know what I mean?
  419. I’m not glorifying it at all, I’m just basically telling you that sometimes I have suicidal thoughts. And maybe I should seek help, or maybe it’s not that deep.
  420. I’m not a gay rights activist.
  421. I’m not a gangster, bro.
  422. I’m here to break boundaries, man. That’s all. I’m here to be the first so that the people after me don’t have to think twice about expressing themselves and being free.
  423. I’m going to be a fashion icon in a minute. I’m not going to do it in a corny manner. I have a voice that speaks for a whole other market – not just black people, but high fashion urban people. I mix street wear with high fashion. It’s never been seen before.
  424. I’m getting my respect as a video director. The fashion industry respects me and knows who I am.
  425. I would not consider myself to be a quote unquote real New York rapper. I don’t even like New York rappers.
  426. I wanted to model when I was younger.
  427. I wanted to appeal to people who’ve never really listened to hip-hop or really given it a chance before. I’ve also tried to incorporate all my favorite lifestyle things in the music. Of course, ‘Fashion Killa’ is one of peoples’ favorites because it just expresses how much I like fashion.
  428. I used to go to Saks, I would go to Bergdorf, I would go to Barneys, I would go to thrift stores in SoHo.
  429. I used to be homophobic, but as I got older, I realized that wasn’t the way to do things. I don’t discriminate against anybody for their sexual preference, for their skin color… that’s immature.
  430. I treat everybody equal, and so I want to be sure that my listeners and my followers do the same if they’re gonna represent me. And if I’m gonna represent them, then I also want to do it in a good way.
  431. I take cabs if I need to get somewhere or I take car service. I don’t drive, I wouldn’t mind riding a bike… People think that because you become an entertainer you gotta have this rock star thug image. I’m an artist, man. I’m going to live like an artist.
  432. I strive for perfection, but I’m not perfect. But what I can say is my morals are totally different than any other 24-year-old rapper my age now. I look at life totally different. A whole other aspect. I have different views and morals on life in general. And opinions.
  433. I represent the kids who come from nothing but who understand it all and love it all. That’s what I represent – those are the cool kids, you know, the kids of tomorrow, because who would’ve known that I’d be who I am today? We are the kids of tomorrow.
  434. I remember one time I went to Craigslist to find something; that’s how bad I wanted it. It was a pair of Raf Simons – this was like 2010. But Raf said he was going to make them for me.
  435. I really want to do the unexpected, and I think that’s what I did when I executed ‘Long.Live.A$AP.’ I wanted people to really see the message and that I’m an artist who not only has the capability of rapping, but of composing great music both for people of my generation and for people with different backgrounds.
  436. I love ‘Robot Chicken,’ ‘The Boondocks’ and ‘America’s Funniest Home Videos.’ Then there’s this show called ‘The First 48.’ It’s a documentary about killings where they try and find murderers. They interrogate people and they tell on each other – it’s hilarious.
  437. I love ‘Harry Potter’ and JK Rowling – don’t laugh at me!
  438. I like women. I love women.
  439. I have a Rolex, but no diamonds. Rappers wear diamonds to compensate for a lack of fashion sense. I don’t even have pierced ears – I’m not into that; it’s too much.
  440. I feel like everything I do in the hip-hop world has an influence. People don’t really notice what I did until somebody else does it. As far as hip-hop goes, I want to continue to make good music, and good art. I don’t really follow the state of hip-hop.
  441. I dress how I feel. I just go off emotion. I can’t prepare my outfit a day before. Everything I wear is spontaneous.
  442. I don’t wear diamond necklaces. I’m not against it but I never could afford it, so now I just wear gold. I wear bracelets, rings, anklets.
  443. I don’t like new cars; I’m into vintage cars – there’s a Jaguar E-Type in the ‘Goldie’ video.
  444. I don’t cook, ’cause I don’t know how to cook.
  445. I don’t care what straight people do, I don’t care what gay people do. I don’t care what nobody do. That’s they business. I just care about what I do. You know what I’m saying?
  446. I chose to deal with the underdogs on ‘1 Train.’ I could’ve got the biggest superstars in the rap game, but why do that when you can let the young boys shine?
  447. For me, growing up in Harlem and then migrating down to SoHo and the Lower East Side and chillin’ down there and making that my stomping ground… That was a big thing, because I’m from Harlem, and downtown is more artsy and also more open-minded. So I got the best of both worlds.
  448. For instance, one big issue in hip hop is the gay thing. It’s 2013, and it’s a shame that, to this day, that topic still gets people all excited. It’s crazy. And it makes me upset that this topic even matters when it comes to hip hop, because it makes it seem like everybody in hip hop is small-minded or stupid – and that’s not the case.
  449. Fashion is almost like a religion, for me at least.
  450. Everybody should be able to enjoy their life, because you only live once. So I just want to get it all out there and be the best role model that I can be, if people want to put me in that kind of predicament. I mean, I didn’t ask to be a role model, because I’m not perfect.
  451. Design my own line? No, I just like the culture.
  452. But for real, for me, I feel like with the red lipstick thing it all depends on the pair of complexion. I’m just being for real. You have to be fair skinned to get away with that.
  453. At the age of eight I started getting into fashion, brands such as Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica and Ralph Lauren. But in 2005 I started wearing John Richmond jeans.
  454. Your shoes have to match your belt. That’s rule number one for guys. You can’t put the brown shoes with the black belt. Or a brown belt with a black wristwatch. Just don’t do it! Also, I don’t like boots with suits. And when you wear sneakers, make sure they go with your shirt.
  455. Your best T-shirt should be like your bed; it just feels like you are home when you are in it.
  456. You know, photo conversations are replacing verbal conversations. I don’t know if that’s a bad thing. A photo is worth a thousand words.
  457. You know, I think that romance sort of coincides with effort, so you can fall flat on your face, but as long as you’re making a great effort, I think it comes off as romantic.
  458. Women have a level of outward compassion that a lot of men don’t necessarily have. Guys feel as deeply as women, but they don’t share it as much.
  459. Whether you like it or not, the digital age has produced a new format for modern romance, and natural selection may be favoring the quick-thumbed quip peddler over the confident, ice-breaking alpha male.
  460. Whether it’s being a leading man, making TV shows, being with my family, I’ve learned a lot.
  461. When your wife calls, you have to take it, no matter what you’re doing.
  462. When you do movies, it’s you have a 3-month family and then everybody goes away and then joins another family, you know?
  463. When you build characters from the outside in, they become, oftentimes they become like ‘Saturday Night Live’ characters or they become like caricatures of the character.
  464. When I was on the ’70s Show,’ I had that and I had ‘Punk’d’ and I had my own production company. That pretty much sealed up all my time.
  465. When I was 13, I had my first job with my dad carrying shingles up to the roof. And then I got a job washing dishes at a restaurant. And then I got a job in a grocery store deli. And then I got a job in a factory sweeping Cheerio dust off the ground.
  466. What I’ve become good at is bringing things that aren’t necessarily mainstream to the mainstream. What I did see on Twitter was a potential for mass publication; it’s a mainstream consumer broadcasting device. It transforms customers and companies. You have to be transparent or you fail.
  467. What I’ve become good at is bringing things that aren’t necessarily mainstream to the mainstream.
  468. Wear a belt! It’s an easy way to pull together your outfit. Just be sure to match it to your shoes.
  469. We’re all living in a casino. It’s just Vegas. Everything is on camera. Everything is being recorded. Everything is on audio. The truth is we all have access to everybody else’s information.
  470. We haven’t lost romance in the digital age, but we may be neglecting it. In doing so, antiquated art forms are taking on new importance. The power of a handwritten letter is greater than ever. It’s personal and deliberate and means more than an e-mail or text ever will.
  471. We all have that desire for something special, something committed. We all want to be The One.
  472. Vulnerability is the essence of romance. It’s the art of being uncalculated, the willingness to look foolish, the courage to say, ‘This is me, and I’m interested in you enough to show you my flaws with the hope that you may embrace me for all that I am but, more important, all that I am not.’
  473. Ultimately there’s a dirty secret about the Internet, which is nothing disappears. All these companies have all your information. They have your search history.
  474. True luxury is being able to own your time – to be able to take a walk, sit on your porch, read the paper, not take the call, not be compelled by obligation.
  475. There’s something advantageous about having people underestimate your intellect, insomuch as a lot of things are revealed to you. They assume you don’t know what you’re talking about, then all of a sudden, you do. And the next thing you know, you have information you wouldn’t normally have.
  476. There’s no text that can replace a loving touch when someone we love is hurting.
  477. There’s no sense in making life seem like it’s a struggle, because that doesn’t make anybody feel better.
  478. There was a point in time where I was doing movies to be able to afford to live in a certain way.
  479. There is some argument about who actually invented text messaging, but I think it’s safe to say it was a man. Multiple studies have shown that the average man uses about half as many words per day as women, thus text messaging. It eliminates hellos and goodbyes and cuts right to the chase.
  480. There are a lot of perks that come with fame, and with every positive there’s a negative, and then it all kind of balances out.
  481. The truth is that I’m an idiot. I am. I don’t do things by the rules sometimes. I say things that I probably shouldn’t say. I push buttons. I deserve to be made fun of. And I feel like, as soon as you can make fun of something, it instantly removes the fear.
  482. The thing that enchants me the most is the ability women have to feel other people’s pain. The total empathy that women have is extraordinary.
  483. The sexiest thing in the entire world is being really smart. And being thoughtful. And being generous. Everything else is crap!
  484. The sexiest thing in the entire world is being really smart. And being thoughtful and being generous. Everything else is crap. I promise you. It’s just crap that people try to sell to you to make you feel like less. So don’t buy it. Be smart. Be thoughtful and be generous.
  485. The scruffier your beard, the sharper you need to dress.
  486. The reality is that we communicate with every part of our being, and there are times when we must use it all. When someone needs us, he or she needs all of us. There’s no text that can replace a loving touch when someone we love is hurting.
  487. The power of a handwritten letter is greater than ever. It’s personal and deliberate and means more than an e-mail or text ever will. It has a unique scent. It requires deciphering. But, most important, it’s flawed.
  488. The goal is not to get into a relationship; the goal is to be in a relationship.
  489. The film industry brings people together, and so does technology. I see them as similar platforms.
  490. The failures that we have are sometimes expensive educations.
  491. Steve Jobs was a pretty complicated character and somewhat a psychologically complicated guy.
  492. Steve Jobs had something like a 90% approval rating from his employees. You hear stories about him being this short-tempered, aggressive person, which he was. But he was in the pursuit of making people around him better, so the product they created would be better.
  493. Seriously, women have a level of outward compassion that a lot of men don’t necessarily have. Guys feel as deeply as women, but they don’t share it as much. Learning how to do that more has been a valuable add.
  494. Romance is sort of an island right next to care. When you care about someone and you listen to them and you hear them and you can feel them and you know just what’s right, and generally it’s something that will be very unimpressive to a room of strangers.
  495. People used to behave morally because they thought God was always watching – in some ways God today is the collective, and the collective is watching.
  496. Opportunity looks a lot like hard work.
  497. One of the things about being on Twitter, for me, is mostly about just being on the pulse of what people are interested in, what people are doing and what people are looking for. I look at entertainment projects and storytelling, and I really try to think about what people want.
  498. One of the things I’ve become immune to is people talking about market cap and social media platforms.
  499. My parents couldn’t give me a whole lot of financial support, but they gave me good genes. My dad is a handsome son-of-a-gun, and my mom is beautiful. And I’ve definitely been the lucky recipient. So, thank you, Mom and Dad.
  500. My mom’s whole side of the family, they’re all Packers fans. My mom’s a Bears fan. My stepdad is a Vikings guy. So that gets ugly. My mom sits upstairs watching the Bears game; he sits in the basement. They can’t watch it together. Football’s a violent anger in our family dynamic.
  501. My mom is still yelling at me because she needs more autographed pictures.
  502. My goal is to embrace the people, the ‘natural resources’ of Israel, and to build businesses with the creative Israelis.
  503. Modeling is the best because you have to look hot, which comes easy to me, you know. I’m blessed with that.
  504. Life can be a lot broader… when you realize one simple thing: And that is that everything around us that we call life was made up by people who were no smarter than you. And you can build your own life that other people can live in. So build a life. Don’t live one. Build one. Find your opportunity, and always be sexy.
  505. Leapfrog innovation – consistent, constant, ridiculous leapfrog innovation – only happens within a dictatorship. Any time you try to do something really innovative, most people aren’t going to understand it until after they experience it. So when you’re developing in innovation, you have to be a dictator.
  506. Katalyst is a merger of three industries. A piece of us is connected to ad agencies. Because we get the complex overlay of the social Web, we know how to engage an audience and how to make entertainment for the social Web. And we know how to gain and activate and retain an audience. So we create social networks for brands.
  507. It’s really easy, once somebody passes away, for the tales about them to become taller, the good ones and the bad ones.
  508. It’s hard to appreciate success in modeling, because it’s not something you feel like you’ve earned, so there is a little bit of bread of shame that comes with that. It’s like somebody giving you a puzzle that’s already put together.
  509. In the movies, you want a good story and characters that are honest, but you are also looking for a good director who can lead the ship. That’s how we look at business. Everybody has a great idea for a start-up, and so do their relatives, and they tell me, ‘You gotta build it.’ I say, ‘I have to believe in it.’
  510. In e-commerce, your prices have to be better because the consumer has to take a leap of faith in your product.
  511. If you really want to make a relationship work, at some point in time, you’re going to have to make some sacrifices and do some things that are a little bit uncomfortable.
  512. If Google decided at any point to publish my search history, or your search history, or anyone’s search history, there’s a litany of things they could idea police you about, and if it was published, you would be publicly shamed. Everyone would be publicly shamed. But we trust Google, and we trust the people that run that company.
  513. If Facebook gets your entire social graph, you don’t necessarily want to share everything with your entire social graph. You might wanna parse that social graph. So there’s a company called PASS that is a private social network that I personally use for my friends and my family.
  514. I’ve usually found that the greatest rewards in my life come from taking on things that are a little bit scary.
  515. I’ve never had a job in my life that I was better than. I was always just lucky to have a job. And every job I had was a steppingstone to my next job, and I never quit my job until I had my next job.
  516. I’ve learned the hard way how valuable privacy is. And I’ve learned that there are a lot of things in your life that really benefit from being private. And relationships are one of them.
  517. I’ve had some really, really wild fun nights in Vegas. I ended up on stage once with this band, The Digital Underground, doing the Humpty Dance.
  518. I’ve constantly done my best to get the best material I can get with the best directors I can get to direct me.
  519. I’ve already exceeded my expectations for myself. I’m one of the most influential people! I mean come on! I wanted to be… I never thought the things I’ve experienced in my life, I didn’t think that was the life that I was gonna get to live.
  520. I’m very tech-forward. However, I also think hitting the pause button is not a bad thing, and really connecting with people one-to-one viscerally, having a connection with someone, is really important.
  521. I’m very awkward when I have time off. I don’t know what to do with myself. It’s weird not to work.
  522. I’m not a follower of this or that religious leader. More wars are started because of religious leaders, and people are following and they don’t know why… That is religiosity. That is what turns people into robots.
  523. I’m happy wherever I go, whatever I do. I’m happy in Iowa, I’m happy here in California.
  524. I’m from Iowa, we don’t know what cool is!
  525. I’m continually trying to make choices that put me against my own comfort zone. As long as you’re uncomfortable, it means you’re growing.
  526. I’m a guy’s guy. I don’t comb my hair unless I have to, and I don’t use lotions or fancy shampoos.
  527. I’ll probably never be the best actor in Hollywood, but I hope to be the hardest working.
  528. I wouldn’t say you have an online life and a real life. I think technology is just mapping and organizing what already exists.
  529. I wouldn’t say I’m personally trying to transition from comedy into drama. I don’t look at things like, ‘Oh, I need to do a drama now.’ I get a lot of material sent to me, and if I feel like something has the creative integrity and the right director and the right whoever involved, the right actors and is a great story, then I do it.
  530. I would say probably my most alpha quality is my competitive nature. I’m very competitive, and it tends to bring out very much the man in me.
  531. I would say I’m 90 percent collaborative in everything I do, and 10 percent of the time I just make the call.
  532. I would just like a woman someday, somewhere, at some point in my life to say to me, ‘You’re a great listener.’ Haven’t heard it yet, and that’s a superior compliment to get from a woman. But I’m going to work on it.
  533. I woke up many mornings not knowing what I’d done the night before. I’m amazed I’m not dead.
  534. I was on Facebook. I was on MySpace. And somebody said to me, You should check out this thing called Twitter. I knew five people that were on it, so I started following those people and seeing what they were doing, and then I applied my own sensibility to it. The more that I shared, the more people started following me.
  535. I wanted to be a genetic engineer. That was my goal in college. I wanted to figure out what the codon sequence was that causes replication in a cardio myopathic virus. That was my goal.
  536. I want to be like Tom Cruise from ‘The Outsiders’ and go on and do amazing movies for a long time.
  537. I try to make good decisions as decisions come up.
  538. I trust my government. I actually have a trust for my government with my data, and I trust them to protect me. They’ve protected me – they’ve made the best efforts to protect me my whole life.
  539. I think we’ve all been in the middle of doing something we cared about, when someone coming in the room and saying ‘hello’ was annoying. I personally can understand that, as someone who tries to create.
  540. I think that when we start thought-policing people and idea-policing people, then that’s crossing a line. And I think, you know, everybody’s so afraid of this imaginary line of thought police that they forget their own personal safety.
  541. I think that the way that Steve Jobs sought after love was to create products that people loved. And when people loved his products, in turn they – he felt like they loved him.
  542. I think that romance sort of coincides with effort, so you can fall flat on your face, but as long as you’re making a great effort, I think it comes off as romantic. So it can be something as simple as, like, if you’re someone who doesn’t cook, you can make a meal.
  543. I think privacy is valuable. You don’t have to share everything, and it’s healthy to occasionally hit the pause button and ask yourself if you’re oversharing. But at the end of the day, if you’re not doing anything wrong, you don’t have anything to hide.
  544. I think people know Steve Jobs the showman. I think people know the guy who stood up and gave the keynotes. The magician. The salesman.
  545. I think at all social networks, be it Facebook or Twitter or whatever it is, there’s an ecosystem that exist there. But there’s also an ego system that exists there.
  546. I think about the automobile, I think about like, when I was a kid, you know, the invention of the answering machine, which I was like, ‘Wow.’ Or call waiting, which was, like, very big. It was a very big thing. Call waiting was a very big thing. And these incremental innovations happen constantly.
  547. I think Ryan Gosling is a really great actor who’s meticulous about his work. And I’d love to have the guts that Johnny Depp has to actually go outside the box on a character. When he plays a character, he plays it in a way that nobody else would.
  548. I think I probably think about myself as an actor, which is the way most people do. I think I’m good, I don’t think I’m great. I think I would hire somebody else to play me in the movie about me.
  549. I say whatever I think and whatever is on my mind, and I just hope that it comes out good. I just try to have a lot of fun.
  550. I really think that you have to find a partner that compliments you and is somebody that pushes you and is better at some things than you are, so they can push you to improve yourself as a person. That’s my take.
  551. I really think that you have to find a partner that compliments you and is somebody that pushes you and is better at some things than you are, so they can push you to improve yourself as a person.
  552. I really think that technology has the greatest potential to accelerate happiness of most things in the world. The companies that will ultimately do well are the companies that chase happiness. If you find a way to help people find love, or health or friendship, the dollar will chase that.
  553. I never thought in my life, I never really thought I would get married. I watched my parents go through a divorce, and I thought, like, this is just not something people are supposed to do.
  554. I live my life like anybody else, and people choose to write about mine. And what they write I can’t control – when they write lies at least – because the laws can’t really protect you unless you can prove malicious intent. So I just choose not to read it.
  555. I like a high boot on a girl.
  556. I learned what a Birkin bag is from the price tag. You’ll never forget what it is once you’ve paid for one.
  557. I have someone that cooks for me… that’s the best thing ever. I just want to show up and I want my house to be like a hotel… so I want to have a couple of options… I like to have a couple of options.
  558. I guess I really haven’t thought much about winning an Oscar, but if I had the opportunity, I’m sure I would like it.
  559. I feel like a fraud… My name is not even actually Ashton. Ashton is my middle name.
  560. I fail frequently – I just try to keep it quiet.
  561. I don’t think opposites attract. I think like attracts like. So I don’t think that they do attract, opposites. Only when you’re talking about magnetic poles.
  562. I don’t think I’m a funny person in general. I have had to learn comedy.
  563. I don’t read the magazines that make things up about people. I know what the truth is. I don’t sort of indulge in my own fodder. I don’t really care what they write about me.
  564. I don’t have to act for work anymore; I can act for passion. That’s freeing, but it’s also a prison of its own. When you can do anything you want, you’re really responsible to do something great. And that’s scary.
  565. I don’t buy these rag magazines that feed off of stolen, you know, press. They’re basically stealing someone’s image in order to make money for themselves… They wait at the end of my street in their cars. Every time I exit my home, I have company.
  566. I don’t believe that old cliche that good things come to those who wait. I think good things come to those who want something so bad they can’t sit still.
  567. I didn’t really go the starving-artist route. I kind of went and did massive, commercial things.
  568. I didn’t come from the worst of situations, and I didn’t come into the best of situations. But I’ve appreciated the best situations. And I’ve made the best of the worst situations. I’m lucky to be where I am.
  569. I definitely believe that if you stop working at relationships, they go away.
  570. I could never be with a woman who felt like she needs to change me.
  571. I could never be with a woman who felt like she needed to change me.
  572. I certainly don’t think I’m deserving of taking up space forever as a human. There’s a whole generation of people yet to be born that are going to be so much more evolved than I am. I don’t want to take up space. They’re going to be better equipped to make the world a better place than I am.
  573. I can’t grow a mustache. It’s pretty sad if I attempt to.
  574. I believe that opportunity looks a lot like hard work.
  575. I am only young once, who cares if I’m a goofball!
  576. I actually used to be a front for the largest national sports-betting syndicate in America.
  577. For me, the most entertaining evening would be to go sit with entrepreneurs and talk with them about how they’re building their companies and how we can help to make them better. That’s the one thing in the world – well, I love doing that.
  578. Everyone loved Steve Jobs and the idea of Steve Jobs. Like a lot of people, I loved a man I never knew.
  579. Everybody likes to hold up a really big righteous sword when people make mistakes. Well guess what, now it’s recorded and everyone has access to it… so let’s stop judging people.
  580. Entertainment, really, is a dying industry.
  581. Don’t settle for what life gives you; make life better and build something.
  582. Be careful with the man jewelry. A little goes a long way.
  583. As marriage goes, I think most people sort of set being – you know getting married as the goal as opposed to being married.
  584. Anyone who wants to be an entrepreneur like someone else is actually looking in the wrong direction. You don’t look out for inspiration, you look in. You have to ask yourself how can I be better today, at solving the problem I am trying to solve for my company. I wouldn’t encourage anyone to be like me. Just be like you.
  585. Anyone who has tried to build something that changes people’s lives sometimes finds life to be a distraction, and finds people who don’t care as much as they do to be annoying.
  586. Americans think that they have a history, but it’s nothing compared to Europe.
  587. Always roll up the sleeves on your shirt. It gives the impression that you’re working, even if you’re not.
  588. After ‘Punk’d,’ my company Katalyst did a deal with AOL to produce short-form content for the Web. At that time it was a different game. If you got front-page coverage on any popular website, you could probably get a push.
  589. Acting can be so much fun that it’s easy to forget that what you’re doing is a job. But if I’ve got my tie on, I’m going to work.
  590. A lot of the characters I play are very naive, and I don’t think I’m like that. And I’m not stupid!
  591. A lot of people use social media to share mundane things or for self-glorification. I try to use it to share interesting things with people.
  592. Your body is spewing off millions of data points a second.
  593. You make a ton of progress by making a ton of mistakes.
  594. Wouldn’t it be awesome if we had a jetpack that wasn’t a death trap? The problem is that it is going to be so power inefficient. I just couldn’t live with that… it would be as loud as a motorcycle.
  595. Without getting into specifics, I assure you we are looking at very substantial opportunities for Loon – Google-scale opportunities.
  596. Why shoot for the moon? It matters because when you try to do something radically hard, you approach the problem differently than when you try to make something incrementally better.
  597. When you try to do something ten per cent better, you tend to work from where you are: if I ask you to make a car that goes 50 miles a gallon, you can just retool the engine you already have.
  598. When you go into a bar, there are hundreds and hundreds of cameras in that bar – many of them installed by that bar. They might be checking something or taking a picture of you.
  599. When you attack a problem as though it were solvable, even though you don’t know how to solve it, you will be shocked with what you come up with. It’s 100 times more worth it. It’s never 100 times harder.
  600. When we try to make a car that drives itself, we believe – whether we’re right or not – we believe that there would be strong net positive benefit to the world if cars could drive themselves safer than people could.
  601. When technology reaches that level of invisibility in our lives, that’s our ultimate goal. It vanishes into our lives. It says, ‘You don’t have to do the work; I’ll do the work.’
  602. We’ve got rings, glasses, we wear things for armor, for protection from the elements, to signal our status to other people. And we’re going to co-opt a lot of those things, where wearables are going to end up being the interface between us in the world.
  603. We’re going to look back and wonder why we had to micro-control our cars.
  604. We’re excited about how tech can be used to get tech out of the way.
  605. We need to make sure that the things we are already working on turn out to do the things we believe they can do and creating value both for the world and ultimately for Google.
  606. We know in our hearts that technology at its best should make us feel even more human than we currently feel. Sometimes it makes us feel less human.
  607. We don’t take on Google Glass or the self-driving car project or Project Loon unless we think that on a risk-adjusted basis, it’s worth Google’s money to do it.
  608. We don’t have some message from God that gives us a list of what’s good and what’s not good. Obviously, we have to make our own flawed judgments about each thing.
  609. We are serious as a heart attack about making the world a better place.
  610. We are proposing that there is value in a totally new product category and a totally new set of questions. Just like the Apple II proposed, ‘Would you reasonably want a computer in your home if you weren’t an accountant or professional?’ That is the question Glass is asking, and I hope in the end that is how it will be judged.
  611. VisiCalc and WordPerfect were the killer apps of their day, but Google and Facebook make them look small in comparison.
  612. Use creativity and storytelling as your main muscle instead of smartness.
  613. Ultimately, a timeless story has to be about the human condition.
  614. To say a scientist is not at all responsible is wrong. But to say that someone who invents a piece of knowledge or technology is responsible for all future uses is ridiculous. It doesn’t have to be that binary.
  615. There’s this open question of what Google is going to be a decade or more from now. Google X isn’t the only answer to that question, but it was built as a place to do some of the exploration to find some great new problems for Google to tackle.
  616. There’s no point having something worn on your body – that’s a big ask – unless you can give people something they really couldn’t get otherwise. It has to be qualitatively better for it to be worn.
  617. There is no law of physics that says just because we’re connected, there has to be this schism between our physical lives and our digital lives.
  618. The world is not limited by IQ. We are all limited by bravery and creativity.
  619. The real goal of AI is to understand and build devices that can perceive, reason, act, and learn at least as well as we can.
  620. The moonshot for Google Glass is to harmonize the physical and digital worlds. It is specifically to find a way to help people be naturally, elegantly situated, physical and digitally, at the same time.
  621. The longer you work on something, the more you don’t really want to know what the world is going to tell you.
  622. The great decision was the Explorer program. The thing we did not do well is that we allowed and somewhat encouraged too much exposure to the program.
  623. The future is all about leading a stress-free life and having all the solutions for all problems at hand.
  624. The faster you can get your ideas in contact with the real world, the faster you can discover what is broken with your idea.
  625. The cycling helmet can save your life, but it doesn’t look good and tends to ruin your hair.
  626. The Explorer edition of Glass wasn’t for everyone, but the Explorer program pushed us to find a wide range of near-term applications and uses for something like Glass.
  627. Really, having people who have different mental perspectives is what’s important.
  628. Really great entrepreneurs have this very special mix of unstoppable optimism and scathing paranoia.
  629. Rather than thinking of ourselves as a computer, and trying to give you computer-like functionality, it’s better to start from the understanding that this is a pair of glasses, and say, ‘How smart can we make these glasses for you?’
  630. Phones would not be better if they could be cooler looking, if they could weight less, or if they could have more battery. Phones would be better if we didn’t have to carry them around.
  631. People text when they’re meant to actually be driving. So imagine what they do when they think the car’s got it under control.
  632. People do really stupid things while driving.
  633. Our goal is not to produce immediate results. We’ve been tasked with producing long-term results. That means that there’s more risk in any individual thing we take on. But we still aspire to a strong return on investment.
  634. Our culture already has a number of well known stories about artificial life and non-human intelligence. In ‘Exegesis,’ I’ve tried to not only tell a new and engaging story but also to comment on those well known stories through the details of my novel.
  635. Most of us have to spend a lot of energy to learn how to drive a car. Then we have to spend the rest of our lives over-concentrating as we drive and text and eat a burrito and put on makeup. As a result, 30,000 people die every year in a car accident in the U.S.
  636. Most ideas don’t work out. Almost all ideas don’t work out. So it’s okay if yours didn’t work out.
  637. Moonshots live in that place between audacious projects and pure science fiction.
  638. Moonshot thinking starts with picking a big problem: something huge, long existing, or on a global scale.
  639. Making a moonshot is almost more an exercise in creativity than it is in technology.
  640. Let’s make health care a meritocracy. Access to the best care goes to people who did what they could to avoid becoming ill.
  641. It’s crazy that you have to tell your phone or your computer or your house or your car ‘It’s me!’ hundreds of times a day. Wearables will solve that problem.
  642. It is the essence of innovation to fail most of the time.
  643. It comes up over and over and over again that a ten times increase in the weight-oriented density of batteries or the volume metric, the space-oriented density of batteries, would enable so many other moonshots that that’s one that just constantly comes up over and over again, and we will start that moonshot if we can find a great idea.
  644. If you’re shooting to make the world 10% better, you’re in a smartness contest with everyone else in the world – and you’re going to lose. There are too many smart people in the world.
  645. If you want to explore things you haven’t explored, having people who look just like you and think just like you is not the best way.
  646. If you don’t have a tonne of optimism, you’re not going to make it… you won’t be able to evangelise to everyone else. On the other hand, if you aren’t constantly paranoid about what can go wrong and put plans in place, then you’re going to get bitten at some point.
  647. If we want to help Google become something meaningfully different in the future, then that’s more likely to happen if we focus on the physical world instead.
  648. If software’s the only thing in your bag of tools, I’m not going to give you great odds.
  649. I’m a father to four kids, so it bothers me that even though our children think big naturally, our society systematically trains them out of thinking that way.
  650. I’m a compulsive storyteller, an avid reader, and have always nurtured the secret goal of spending my life as a writer.
  651. I think wearables in general have, as their best calling, to better understand our current state and needs and to express those back to the world.
  652. I think we’ll see, not only with Glass, but the watch wearables, with the contact lens, that each of these things have their own best purpose, but it will take more on our part and society’s part to figure out what that is.
  653. I started my second company in 1999. BodyMedia was set up to take advantage of the future of wearables – sensors and computing worn on our bodies in any and all ways that could make our lives better.
  654. I personally have a philosophy around authenticity and vulnerability.
  655. I grant that people are generally uncomfortable with how fast privacy issues are changing in the world, but Google Glass is not going to move the needle on that.
  656. I don’t believe a mistake-free learning environment exists.
  657. I do believe that making a factory for innovation, a moon-shot factory, is possible.
  658. I believe that the right thing for us to do, as much as we can and without confusing people, is to talk about how we’re doing, the things that are going well but also the things that aren’t going well.
  659. Here is the surprising truth: It’s often easier to make something 10 times better than it is to make it 10 percent better.
  660. Google is already overflowing with incredibly creative bright groups already working on lots of the software problems of the world.
  661. Google Glass is the wearable computer that responds to voice commands and displays information on a visual display.
  662. Going from an error rate of 25 meters in GPS to 2.5 meters is huge. Going to 25 centimeters is going to matter just as much.
  663. Glass is the world’s worst spy camera. If you want to surreptitiously take photos, I would not use Glass.
  664. Find some fun way to get a little more oil on your hands or mud on your boots. Sometimes, that’s what it takes to take down some of the really big problems.
  665. Failures are cheap if you do them first. Failures are expensive if you do them at the end.
  666. Failing doesn’t have to mean not succeeding. It can be, ‘Hey we tried that. We can go forward, smarter.’
  667. Every time you drop the price by a factor of two, you roughly get a 10 times pickup of the number of people who will seriously consider buying it.
  668. Every day, hundreds of millions of people stab themselves, bleed, and then offer, like a sacrifice, to the glucose monitor they’re carrying with them. It’s such a bad user interface that even though in the medium-term it’s life or death for these people, hundreds of millions of people don’t engage in this user interface.
  669. Doing exercise without monitoring yourself will be rare in the future of wearable technology.
  670. Anything which is a huge problem for humanity we’ll sign up for, if we can find a way to fix it.
  671. Actually, that issue of ‘Don’t be evil’ is probably the number one reason we throw out ideas.
  672. A ten-times increase in the weight-oriented density of batteries would enable so many other moonshots, if we can find a great idea. We just haven’t found one yet.
  673. You want to ensure people can do it right 99 percent of time. When we have to fire one of our surgical trainees, it is never because they don’t have the physical skills but because they don’t have the moral skills – to practise and admit failure.
  674. You know, 97 percent of the time, if you come into a hospital, everything goes well. But three percent of the time, we have major complications.
  675. When I do an operation, it’s half a dozen people. When it goes beautifully, it’s like a symphony, with everybody playing their part.
  676. We now live in the era of the super-specialist – of clinicians who have taken the time to practice at one narrow thing until they can do it better than anyone who hasn’t.
  677. To become a doctor, you spend so much time in the tunnels of preparation – head down, trying not to screw up, trying to make it from one day to the next – that it is a shock to find yourself at the other end, with someone shaking your hand and asking how much money you want to make.
  678. This is the reality of intensive care: at any point, we are as apt to harm as we are to heal.
  679. There are, in human affairs, two kinds of problems: those which are amenable to a technical solution and those which are not. Universal health-care coverage belongs to the first category: you can pick one of several possible solutions, pass a bill, and (allowing for some tinkering around the edges) it will happen.
  680. The writing I love has something memorable in it – an image, a smell. It’s the connection between the moment and the whole concept, weaving the micro together with the macro so that it has a hold on people – that’s writing.
  681. The vast majority of doctors really do try to take the money out of their minds. But to provide the best possible care requires using resources in a way that keeps you viable but improves the quality of care.
  682. The history of American agriculture suggests that you can have transformation without a master plan, without knowing all the answers up front.
  683. The health-care sector certainly employs more people and more machines than it did. But there have been no great strides in service. In Western Europe, most primary-care practices now use electronic health records and offer after-hours care; in the United States, most don’t.
  684. The damage that the human body can survive these days is as awesome as it is horrible: crushing, burning, bombing, a burst blood vessel in the brain, a ruptured colon, a massive heart attack, rampaging infection. These conditions had once been uniformly fatal.
  685. Providing health care is like building a house. The task requires experts, expensive equipment and materials, and a huge amount of coordination.
  686. People say that the most expensive piece of medical equipment is the doctor’s pen. It’s not that we make all the money. It’s that we order all the money.
  687. Outsiders tend to be the first to recognize the inadequacies of our social institutions. But, precisely because they are outsiders, they are usually in a poor position to fix them.
  688. Our health-care morass is like the problems of global warming and the national debt – the kind of vast policy failure that is far easier to get into than to get out of. Americans say that they want leaders who will take on these problems.
  689. Our great struggle in medicine these days is not just with ignorance and uncertainty. It’s also with complexity: how much you have to make sure you have in your head and think about. There are a thousand ways things can go wrong.
  690. Oliver Sacks remains my hero to this day. He was one of the first medical writers I read. The other was Lewis Thomas, who is no longer alive but is just heroic to me.
  691. No one teaches you how to think about money in medical school or residency. Yet, from the moment you start practicing, you must think about it. You must consider what is covered for a patient and what is not.
  692. No one looks at your hands to see how much they shake when you are interviewed to be a surgeon. The physical skills required are no greater than for writing cursive script. If an operation requires so much skill only a few surgeons can do it, you modify the operation to make it simpler.
  693. My vantage point on the world is the operating room where I see my patients.
  694. Most people are squeamish about saying how much they earn, but in medicine the situation seems especially fraught. Doctors aren’t supposed to be in it for the money, and the more concerned a doctor seems to be about making money the more suspicious people become about the care being provided.
  695. In every industrialized nation, the movement to reform health care has begun with stories about cruelty.
  696. If I get hit by a bus tomorrow, my patients will not even be postponed. Another surgeon would step in and take over. The reason to do research and writing is that it at least makes me feel not entirely replaceable. If I didn’t write, I don’t know if I would do surgery.
  697. I’m floating between multiple media. I really wish you could buy the hardcover book and it would come with the digital download and audible version. I spend stupid amounts of money because I’m usually buying my books in at least two formats.
  698. I write because it’s my way of finding cool ideas, thinking through hard problems and things I don’t understand, and getting better at something.
  699. I was never born to write. I was taught to write. And I am still being taught to write.
  700. I think we are faced in medicine with the reality that we have to be willing to talk about our failures and think hard about them, even despite the malpractice system. I mean, there are things that we can do to make that system better.
  701. I think the extreme complexity of medicine has become more than an individual clinician can handle. But not more than teams of clinicians can handle.
  702. I have always believed that there is nothing greater than a life in rock n’ roll – it has to be good rock n’ roll – and I still think it is true.
  703. I believe that one version of the good in life can be defined by the moments I sometimes had playing tennis as a sixteen-year-old. You’d be out on the court and for an hour, two hours, sometimes an entire roasting hot day, and every single thing you hit would go in. Hit that ball as hard as you wanted, wherever you wanted, and it went in.
  704. Human beings are social creatures. We are social not just in the trivial sense that we like company, and not just in the obvious sense that we each depend on others. We are social in a more elemental way: simply to exist as a normal human being requires interaction with other people.
  705. Health care confronts us with a difficult test. We have never corrected failure in something so deeply embedded in people’s lives and in the economy without the pressure of an outright crisis.
  706. George Orwell is a pinnacle writer, for his combination of moral insight and literary writing.
  707. Expertise is the mantra of modern medicine.
  708. Every country in the world is battling the rising cost of health care. No community anywhere has demonstrably lowered its health-care costs (not just slowed their rate of increase) by improving medical services. They’ve lowered costs only by cutting or rationing them.
  709. Doctors quickly learn that how much they make has little to do with how good they are. It largely depends on how they handle the business side of their practice.
  710. Cost is the spectre haunting health reform. For many decades, the great flaw in the American health-care system was its unconscionable gaps in coverage.
  711. As economists have often pointed out, we pay doctors for quantity, not quality. As they point out less often, we also pay them as individuals, rather than as members of a team working together for their patients. Both practices have made for serious problems.
  712. Writing is hard – writing is the hardest.
  713. With stand-up, it doesn’t matter who you are. If the audience claps because they love your movies, that clapping stops after five seconds, and then it’s your job to make them laugh.
  714. When you improvise, you work off the laughs from the audience, but when you step on stage to do standup, it’s silent.
  715. When I’m on the couch, I usually have the TV on and my MacBook Air nearby. And sometimes, when my ADD is really kicking in, I have my iPad too. And my iPhone. And a magazine that I haven’t gotten to. And a book under the pillow to my left.
  716. When I was in high school I was a really huge ‘SNL’ fan. I remember the cast around the time I started watching it – Will Ferrell, Ana Gasteyer, Molly Shannon, Cheri O’Teri, Tracy Morgan. I did research to find out how people got on the show. Their bios always said they came from an improv team, so I started taking classes.
  717. When I was doing comedy in New York, before I was in movies, I was never known as the deadpan actress. I was just a comedienne.
  718. Well, I was obsessed with Judy Garland growing up. Like, obsessed.
  719. Tina Fey is one of my heroes.
  720. There’s no photo-shoot academy. If there was, I’d probably be kicked out.
  721. There are always parts of me that come out in the characters that I play – it’s the only thing I have to work with and to draw off of.
  722. Sarcasm is weird. Even not in acting, in life I feel like ‘sarcastic’ is a word that people use to describe me sometimes so when I meet someone, it’s almost like they feel like they have to also be sarcastic, but it can sometimes just come off as mean if it’s not used in the right way.
  723. My people would love it if I smiled more, if I was more ‘approachable.’
  724. My grandfather came over from Puerto Rico and raised his kids speaking English so that it would be easier for them to assimilate.
  725. Louis C. K. is one of my all time favorite standup comedians.
  726. It’s such a thing now, people making fun of other people on the Internet.
  727. If I have the option, I always read the paper or a book or something I can touch and destroy in my own hands.
  728. I’ve felt depressed many times in my life, so I can draw on those times in my life when I need to.
  729. I’m totally an anxious mess all the time. There’s a constant dialogue going on in my brain, and it’s just reminding me of all the failures that I have had, and all of the things I need to do, and all of the things I’m not doing good enough.
  730. I’m pretty good at weaseling my way into a job, even if I have no business being there.
  731. I’m not, like, Daniel Day Lewis. Yet. I will get there!
  732. I’m not super comfortable in my skin. I have to make it work for me, and that usually amounts to making it uncomfortable for everyone else.
  733. I’m not a super emotional person, so that’s one reason I love acting – it makes me deal with myself in that kind of way.
  734. I’m like that person who hates going to magic shows – and I love magic, I love wizards – but going to a show where there is any possibility of audience participation is a nightmare for me.
  735. I would never do a commercial for something that is embarrassing, and I think that people maybe have a different perspective on what is embarrassing or not. Some people think doing a Revlon hair commercial is really cool. To me, that’s embarrassing, but World of Warcraft – not embarrassing, very cool.
  736. I think being on a TV show is amazing but also, people get kind of used to seeing you a certain way and so it becomes a challenge to break free from that in a way.
  737. I obviously bring all of my insecurities along with me to any role that I tackle.
  738. I mean, sometimes I hate interviews because I always feel like I sound stupid.
  739. I love great acting, as nerdy as that sounds.
  740. I like my name. My mom named me after a song by the 1970s group Bread. So, it’s meaningful, and I like the song. It’s a love song – kind of – but it’s kind of depressing and dark.
  741. I just want to keep finding special characters that I feel like I can bring to life and characters that are real and not superficial.
  742. I get really weird when I’m not working. I have to keep working.
  743. I don’t let myself ‘surf’ on the Web, or I would probably drown.
  744. I can’t say I follow politics extremely closely, but I’m definitely aware of what’s going on in the world.
  745. I am a Netflix/DVR junkie. I don’t like to watch TV without a plan.
  746. A lot of independent films offer a harsh reality check.
  747. Your silence will not protect you.
  748. You know how fighting fish do it? They blow bubbles and in each one of those bubbles is an egg and they float the egg up to the surface. They keep this whole heavy nest of eggs floating, and they’re constantly repairing it. It’s as if they live in both elements.
  749. When we speak we are afraid our words will not be heard or welcomed. But when we are silent, we are still afraid. So it is better to speak.
  750. When we create out of our experiences, as feminists of color, women of color, we have to develop those structures that will present and circulate our culture.
  751. When I use my strength in the service of my vision it makes no difference whether or not I am afraid.
  752. When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.
  753. We have to consciously study how to be tender with each other until it becomes a habit because what was native has been stolen from us, the love of Black women for each other.
  754. There’s always someone asking you to underline one piece of yourself – whether it’s Black, woman, mother, dyke, teacher, etc. – because that’s the piece that they need to key in to. They want to dismiss everything else.
  755. There are no new ideas. There are only new ways of making them felt.
  756. There are lesbians, God knows… if you came up through lesbian circles in the forties and fifties in New York… who were not feminist and would not call themselves feminists.
  757. The sixties were characterized by a heady belief in instantaneous solutions.
  758. The sharing of joy, whether physical, emotional, psychic, or intellectual, forms a bridge between the sharers which can be the basis for understanding much of what is not shared between them, and lessens the threat of their difference.
  759. The quality of light by which we scrutinize our lives has direct bearing upon the product which we live, and upon the changes which we hope to bring about through those lives.
  760. The master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house.
  761. The learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot.
  762. The failure of academic feminists to recognize difference as a crucial strength is a failure to reach beyond the first patriarchal lesson. In our world, divide and conquer must become define and empower.
  763. Poetry is not only dream and vision; it is the skeleton architecture of our lives. It lays the foundations for a future of change, a bridge across our fears of what has never been before.
  764. Part of the lesbian consciousness is an absolute recognition of the erotic within our lives and, taking that a step further, dealing with the erotic not only in sexual terms.
  765. Our visions begin with our desires.
  766. Only by learning to live in harmony with your contradictions can you keep it all afloat.
  767. Life is very short and what we have to do must be done in the now.
  768. It’s possible to take that as a personal metaphor and then multiply it to a people, a race, a sex, a time. If we can keep this thing going long enough, if we can survive and teach what we know, we’ll make it.
  769. It’s a struggle but that’s why we exist, so that another generation of Lesbians of color will not have to invent themselves, or their history, all over again.
  770. It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences.
  771. In our work and in our living, we must recognize that difference is a reason for celebration and growth, rather than a reason for destruction.
  772. In other words, I would be giving in to a myth of sameness which I think can destroy us.
  773. In discussions around the hiring and firing of Black faculty at universities, the charge is frequently heard that Black women are more easily hired than are Black men.
  774. If I didn’t define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people’s fantasies for me and eaten alive.
  775. I write for those women who do not speak, for those who do not have a voice because they were so terrified, because we are taught to respect fear more than ourselves. We’ve been taught that silence would save us, but it won’t.
  776. I would like to do another piece of fiction dealing with a number of issues: Lesbian parenting, the 1960’s, and interracial relationships in the Lesbian and Gay community.
  777. I remember how being young and black and gay and lonely felt. A lot of it was fine, feeling I had the truth and the light and the key, but a lot of it was purely hell.
  778. I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.
  779. I can’t really define it in sexual terms alone although our sexuality is so energizing why not enjoy it too?
  780. I am deliberate and afraid of nothing.
  781. Each time you love, love as deeply as if it were forever.
  782. But, on the other hand, I get bored with racism too and recognize that there are still many things to be said about a Black person and a White person loving each other in a racist society.
  783. But the true feminist deals out of a lesbian consciousness whether or not she ever sleeps with women.
  784. But the question is a matter of the survival and the teaching. That’s what our work comes down to. No matter where we key into it, it’s the same work, just different pieces of ourselves doing it.
  785. Black writers, of whatever quality, who step outside the pale of what black writers are supposed to write about, or who black writers are supposed to be, are condemned to silences in black literary circles that are as total and as destructive as any imposed by racism.
  786. Black women sharing close ties with each other, politically or emotionally, are not the enemies of Black men.
  787. Black women are programmed to define ourselves within this male attention and to compete with each other for it rather than to recognize and move upon our common interests.
  788. Attend me, hold me in your muscular flowering arms, protect me from throwing any part of myself away.
  789. Art is not living. It is the use of living.
  790. Exam results of India
  791. With my good friend Rob Penny, I founded the Black Horizons Theater in Pittsburgh with the idea of using the theater to politicize the community or, as we said in those days, to raise the consciousness of the people.
  792. We were what you would call a poor family, but we were rich in so many things. We did family things together. We always had dessert, even if it was just Jell-O. So, I never knew I was poor.
  793. The most valuable blacks are those in prison, those who have the warrior spirit, who had a sense of being African. They got for their women and children what they needed when all other avenues were closed to them.
  794. The exact day I became a poet was April 1, 1965, the day I bought my first typewriter.
  795. The blues are important primarily because they contain the cultural expression and the cultural response to blacks in America and to the situation that they find themselves in. And contained in the blues is a philosophical system at work. And as part of the oral tradition, this is a way of passing along information.
  796. Suffice it to say, I’m not poor.
  797. Scripts were rather scarce in 1968. We did a lot of Amiri Baraka’s plays, the agitprop stuff he was writing. It was at a time when black student organizations were active on the campuses, so we were invited to the colleges around Pittsburgh and Ohio, and even as far away as Jackson, Mississippi.
  798. Pittsburgh is a very hard city, especially if you’re black.
  799. Part of what our problem as blacks in America is that we don’t claim that. Partly, you see, because of the linguistic environment in which we live.
  800. Once I started to value and respect my characters, I could really hear them. I just let them start talking.
  801. My plays are ultimately about love, honor, duty, betrayal.
  802. My influences have been what I call my four Bs – the primary one being the blues, then Borges, Baraka, and Bearden.
  803. My hero when I was 14 was Sonny Liston. No matter what kinds of problems you were having with your parents or at school, whatever, Sonny Liston would go and knock guys out, and that made it all right.
  804. My first wife is a good woman, I still can’t say nothing bad about her other than the fact that we had a difference on religion. She wanted someone who was a Muslim who shared those values. And I was like a heathen. I had to stay home on Sundays and watch the football game.
  805. Most of black America is in housing projects, without jobs, living on welfare. And this is not the case in ‘The Cosby Show,’ because all the values in that household are strictly what I would call white American values.
  806. Like most people, I have this sort of love-hate relationship with Pittsburgh. This is my home, and at times I miss it and find it tremendously exciting, and other times I want to catch the first thing out that has wheels.
  807. Keep your hands moving. Writing is rewriting.
  808. Jazz in itself is not struggling. That is, the music itself is not struggling… It’s the attitude that’s in trouble. My plays insist that we should not forget or toss away our history.
  809. It was early on in 1965 when I wrote some of my first poems. I sent a poem to ‘Harper’s’ magazine because they paid a dollar a line. I had an eighteen-line poem, and just as I was putting it into the envelope, I stopped and decided to make it a thirty-six-line poem. It seemed like the poem came back the next day: no letter, nothing.
  810. In 1980 I sent a play, ‘Jitney,’ to the Playwrights’ Center in Minneapolis, won a Jerome Fellowship, and found myself sitting in a room with sixteen playwrights. I remember looking around and thinking that since I was sitting there, I must be a playwright, too.
  811. In 1977, I wrote a series of poems about a character, Black Bart, a former cattle rustler-turned-alchemist. A good friend, Claude Purdy, who is a stage director, suggested I turn the poems into a play.
  812. If you want to participate in life, you have to deny your identity.
  813. I’ve seen some terrible plays, but I generally enjoy myself. One play I walked out of, I have a tremendous respect for the author. That was Robert Wilson, something called ‘Network,’ which consisted of Wilson sitting on a bunk, the dialogue of the movie ‘Network’ looped in while a chair on a rope went up and down.
  814. I’ve never seen ‘Seinfeld’, never seen ‘The Cosby Show’; I just don’t watch it. I saw half of ‘Oprah’ one time. I’d rather read.
  815. I’m a De Niro fan. I went eleven years without seeing a movie; the last one before that, February 1980, was De Niro and Scorsese in ‘Raging Bull,’ and when I went back, it was ‘Cape Fear,’ with De Niro and Scorsese. I picked up right where I left off at.
  816. I write the black experience in America, and contained within that experience, because it is a human experience, are all the universalities.
  817. I write for myself, and my goal is bringing that world and that experience of black Americans to life on the stage and giving it a space there.
  818. I work as an artist, and I think the audience of one, which is the self, and I have to satisfy myself as an artist. So I always say that I write for the same people that Picasso painted for. I think he painted for himself.
  819. I try to explore, in terms of the life I know best, those things which are common to all cultures.
  820. I think the blues is the best literature that we as blacks have created since we’ve been here. I call it our ‘sacred book.’ What I’ve attempted to do is to mine that field, to mine those cultural ideas and attitudes and give them to my characters.
  821. I think of dying every day… At a certain age, you should be prepared to go at any time.
  822. I think it was the ability of the theater to communicate ideas and extol virtues that drew me to it. And also, I was, and remain, fascinated by the idea of an audience as a community of people who gather willingly to bear witness.
  823. I think all in all, one thing a lot of plays seem to be saying is that we need to, as black Americans, to make a connection with our past in order to determine the kind of future we’re going to have. In other words, we simply need to know who we are in relation to our historical presence in America.
  824. I once wrote a short story called ‘The Best Blues Singer in the World,’ and it went like this: ‘The streets that Balboa walked were his own private ocean, and Balboa was drowning.’ End of story. That says it all. Nothing else to say. I’ve been rewriting that same story over and over again. All my plays are rewriting that same story.
  825. I know some things when I start. I know, let’s say, that the play is going to be a 1970s or a 1930s play, and it’s going to be about a piano, but that’s it. I slowly discover who the characters are as I go along.
  826. I just write stuff down and pile it up, and when I get enough stuff, I spread it out and look at it and figure out how to use it.
  827. I haven’t read Ibsen, Shaw, Shakespeare – except ‘The Merchant of Venice’ in ninth grade. I’m not familiar with ‘Death of a Salesman.’ I haven’t read Tennessee Williams.
  828. I had always been fascinated with Napoleon because he was a self-made emperor; Victor Hugo said, ‘Napoleon’s will to power,’ and it was the title of my paper. And I submitted it to my teacher, and he didn’t think I had written it. And he wanted me to explain it to him.
  829. I first got involved in theater in 1968, at the height of a social tumult. I was a poet.
  830. I dropped out of school, but I didn’t drop out of life. I would leave the house each morning and go to the main branch of the Carnegie Library in Oakland where they had all the books in the world… I felt suddenly liberated from the constraints of a pre-arranged curriculum that labored through one book in eight months.
  831. I dropped out of school when I was 15 years old. I dropped out because I guess I wasn’t getting anything out of my investment in the school.
  832. I don’t write particularly to effect social change. I believe writing can do that, but that’s not why I write.
  833. I don’t write for a particular audience. I work as an artist, and I think the audience of one, which is the self, and I have to satisfy myself as an artist. So I always say that I write for the same people that Picasso painted for. I think he painted for himself.
  834. I don’t write for a particular audience.
  835. I don’t look at our society today too much. My focus is still in the past, and part of the reason is because what I do – the wellspring of art, or what I do – l get from the blues. So I listen to the music of a particular period that I’m working on, and I think inside the music is clues to what is happening with the people.
  836. I do – very specifically, I remember Bessie Smith; I used to collect 78 records that I would buy from the St Vincent de Paul store at five cents apiece, and I did this indiscriminately. I would just take whatever was there. And I listened to Patti Page and Walter Huston, ‘September Song.’
  837. I didn’t always value the ways black people talked. I thought, in order to make art out of it, you had to change it.
  838. How do we transform loss? … Time’s healing balm is essentially a hoax.
  839. From Romare Bearden I learned that the fullness and richness of everyday life can be rendered without compromise or sentimentality.
  840. From Borges, those wonderful gaucho stories from which I learned that you can be specific as to a time and place and culture and still have the work resonate with the universal themes of love, honor, duty, betrayal, etc. From Amiri Baraka, I learned that all art is political, although I don’t write political plays.
  841. For me, the original play becomes an historical document: This is where I was when I wrote it, and I have to move on now to something else.
  842. Confront the dark parts of yourself, and work to banish them with illumination and forgiveness. Your willingness to wrestle with your demons will cause your angels to sing.
  843. Blues is the bedrock of everything I do. All the characters in my plays, their ideas and attitudes, the stance they adopt in the world, are all ideas and attitudes that are expressed in the blues.
  844. Blacks in America want to forget about slavery – the stigma, the shame. If you can’t be who you are, who can you be? How can you know what to do? We have our history. We have our book, and that is the blues.
  845. Blacks have traditionally had to operate in a situation where whites have set themselves up as the custodians of the black experience.
  846. Between speeches and awards, you can find something to do every other week. It’s hard to write. Your focus gets splintered. Once you put one thing in your calendar, that month is gone.
  847. As soon as white folks say a play’s good, the theater is jammed with blacks and whites.
  848. Anything you want to know, you ask the characters.
  849. All you need in the world is love and laughter. That’s all anybody needs. To have love in one hand and laughter in the other.
  850. All art is political in the sense that it serves someone’s politics.
  851. A novelist writes a novel, and people read it. But reading is a solitary act. While it may elicit a varied and personal response, the communal nature of the audience is like having five hundred people read your novel and respond to it at the same time. I find that thrilling.
  852. True artists are almost the only men who do their work for pleasure.
  853. To the artist there is never anything ugly in nature.
  854. To any artist, worthy of the name, all in nature is beautiful, because his eyes, fearlessly accepting all exterior truth, read there, as in an open book, all the inner truth.
  855. There are unknown forces in nature; when we give ourselves wholly to her, without reserve, she lends them to us; she shows us these forms, which our watching eyes do not see, which our intelligence does not understand or suspect.
  856. The modes of expression of men of genius differ as much as their souls, and it is impossible to say that in some among them, drawing and color are better or worse than in others.
  857. The artist must create a spark before he can make a fire and before art is born, the artist must be ready to be consumed by the fire of his own creation.
  858. The artist is the confidant of nature, flowers carry on dialogues with him through the graceful bending of their stems and the harmoniously tinted nuances of their blossoms. Every flower has a cordial word which nature directs towards him.
  859. Sculpture is the art of the hole and the lump.
  860. Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.
  861. Nobody does good to men with impunity.
  862. Man’s naked form belongs to no particular moment in history; it is eternal, and can be looked upon with joy by the people of all ages.
  863. Inside you there’s an artist you don’t know about. He’s not interested in how things look different in moonlight.
  864. I invent nothing, I rediscover.
  865. I choose a block of marble and chop off whatever I don’t need.
  866. Art is contemplation. It is the pleasure of the mind which searches into nature and which there divines the spirit of which nature herself is animated.
  867. You cannot compromise unless people talk to you.
  868. With the right kind of institutions, starting with the rule of law, Burma could progress very quickly.
  869. When you decide to follow a certain path, you should follow it to the end and not be diverted from it for personal reasons.
  870. When we think of the state of the economy, we are not thinking in terms of money flow. We are thinking in terms of the effect on everyday lives of people.
  871. When the Nobel Committee chose to honor me, the road I had chosen of my own free will became a less lonely path to follow.
  872. When I was under house arrest, it was the BBC that spoke to me – I listened.
  873. Whatever help we may want from the international community now or in the future, we want to make sure that this help is tailored to help our people to help themselves.
  874. What does Burma have to give the United States? We can give you the opportunity to engage with people who are ready and willing to change a society.
  875. What I have experienced is nothing compared to what political prisoners in prisons suffer.
  876. We will not change in matters of policy until such time as dialogue has begun.
  877. We want to empower our people; we want to strengthen them; we want to provide them with the kind of qualifications that will enable them to build up their own country themselves.
  878. We are not out to boast that there is so much percentage of growth per year. Our real concern is how it affects the lives of people, the future of our country.
  879. We always think that everybody can do a little bit more, if not a lot more.
  880. War is not the only arena where peace is done to death.
  881. To be forgotten, is to die a little.
  882. This was the way I was brought up to think of politics, that politics was to do with ethics, it was to do with responsibility, it was to do with service, so I think I was conditioned to think like that, and I’m too old to change now.
  883. There is so much that we need to do for our country. I don’t think that we can afford to wait.
  884. There is a time to be quiet and a time to talk.
  885. The value systems of those with access to power and of those far removed from such access cannot be the same. The viewpoint of the privileged is unlike that of the underprivileged.
  886. The struggle for democracy and human rights in Burma is a struggle for life and dignity. It is a struggle that encompasses our political, social and economic aspirations.
  887. The people have given me their support; they have given me their trust and confidence. My colleagues have suffered a lot in order to give me support. I do not look upon my life as a sacrifice at all.
  888. The judiciary must be strengthened and released from political interference.
  889. The judiciary in Burma is not independent. It’s widely known, everybody knows that.
  890. The history of the world shows that peoples and societies do not have to pass through a fixed series of stages in the course of development.
  891. The democracy process provides for political and social change without violence.
  892. The best way to help Burma is to empower the people of Burma, to help us have enough self-confidence to obtain what we want for ourselves.
  893. The Nobel Peace Prize opened up a door in my heart.
  894. Suffering degrades, embitters and enrages.
  895. Sometimes I think that a parody of democracy could be more dangerous than a blatant dictatorship, because that gives people an opportunity to avoid doing anything about it.
  896. Since we live in this world, we have to do our best for this world.
  897. Sanctions are not really an economic weapon.
  898. Sanctions and boycotts would be tied to serious political dialogue.
  899. Regime is made up of people, so I do put faces to regimes and governments, so I feel that all human beings have the right to be given the benefit of the doubt, and they also have to be given the right to try to redeem themselves if they so wish.
  900. People must work in unison.
  901. People keep saying I’ve changed. I used to be confrontational. But I’m – I haven’t changed. It was – it’s just that circumstances have changed.
  902. Peace as a goal is an ideal which will not be contested by any government or nation, not even the most belligerent.
  903. One wants to be together with one’s family. That’s what families are about.
  904. One should mature over 20 years.
  905. One person alone can’t do anything as important as bringing genuine democracy to a country.
  906. Once serious political dialogue has begun, the international community can assume that we have achieved genuine progress along the road to real democratisation.
  907. Of course I regret not having been able to spend time with my family.
  908. No, I was never afraid.
  909. My opinion is the greatest reward that any government could get is the approval of the people. If the people are happy and the people are at peace and the government has done something for them, that’s the greatest reward I think any government could hope for.
  910. My attitude to peace is rather based on the Burmese definition of peace – it really means removing all the negative factors that destroy peace in this world. So peace does not mean just putting an end to violence or to war, but to all other factors that threaten peace, such as discrimination, such as inequality, poverty.
  911. My attitude is, do as much as I can while I’m free. And if I’m arrested I’ll still do as much as I can.
  912. More people, especially young people, are realising that if they want change, they’ve got to go about it themselves – they can’t depend on a particular person, i.e. me, to do all the work. They are less easy to fool than they used to be, they now know what’s going on all over the world.
  913. Maybe it is something to do with age, but I have become fonder of poetry than of prose.
  914. It is often in the name of cultural integrity as well as social stability and national security that democratic reforms based on human rights are resisted by authoritarian governments.
  915. It is not power that corrupts but fear. Fear of losing power corrupts those who wield it and fear of the scourge of power corrupts those who are subject to it.
  916. It doesn’t seem right for anybody to get so much attention.
  917. It could achieve a lot if everyone in Burma could stop saying something is good if it is not good, or say something is just if it is not just.
  918. In the end, I think people prefer the good to win rather than the bad.
  919. In terms of the history of a far reaching movement, 20 years is not that long.
  920. In politics, you also have to be cautiously optimistic.
  921. In general people feel more relaxed about participating in politics. They aren’t frightened as they used to be.
  922. If you want to bring an end to long-standing conflict, you have to be prepared to compromise.
  923. If you look at the democratic process as a game of chess, there have to be many, many moves before you get to checkmate. And simply because you do not make any checkmate in three moves does not mean it’s stalemate. There’s a vast difference between no checkmate and stalemate. This is what the democratic process is like.
  924. If you do nothing you get nothing.
  925. If you choose to do something, then you shouldn’t say it’s a sacrifice, because nobody forced you to do it.
  926. If you can make people understand why freedom is so important through the arts, that would be a big help.
  927. If I were the blushing kind, I would blush to be called a hero.
  928. If I was afraid of being killed, I would never speak out against the government.
  929. If I advocate cautious optimism it is not because I do not have faith in the future but because I do not want to encourage blind faith.
  930. I’ve been repeating ad nauseam that we in Burma, we are weak with regard to the culture of negotiated compromises, that we have to develop the ability to achieve such compromises.
  931. I’ve always tried to explain democracy is not perfect. But it gives you a chance to shape your own destiny.
  932. I’ve always said that the more coordinated the efforts of the international community are, the better it will be for democracy in Burma.
  933. I’ve always been strongly on the side of non-violence.
  934. I’m rather inclined to liking people.
  935. I’m not the only one working for democracy in Burma – there are so many people who have worked for it because they believe that this is the only way we can maintain the dignity of our people.
  936. I’m feeling a little delicate.
  937. I would like to have seen my sons growing up.
  938. I wish people wouldn’t think of me as a saint – unless they agree with the definition of a saint that a saint’s a sinner who goes on trying.
  939. I was surprised by the response of young people because there is a perception that those younger than the 1988 generation are not interested in politics.
  940. I was heartened that people everywhere want certain basic freedoms, even if they live in a totally different cultural environment.
  941. I was a bit of a coward when I was small. I was terribly frightened of the dark.
  942. I think, if you have enough inner resources, then you can live in isolation for long periods of time and not feel diminished by it.
  943. I think when the people in Burma stop thinking about whether or not they’re free, it’ll mean that they’re free.
  944. I think sometimes if you are alone, you are freer because your time is your own.
  945. I think by now I have made it fairly clear that I am not very happy with the word hope. I don’t believe in people just hoping.
  946. I think I was the healthiest prisoner of conscience in the world.
  947. I think I should be active politically. Because I look upon myself as a politician. That’s not a dirty work you know. Some people think that there are something wrong with politicians. Of course, something wrong with some politicians.
  948. I saw many aspects of the country which I needed to see in order that I might know what we need to do.
  949. I only used a cell phone for the first time after I was released. I had difficulty coping with it because it seemed so small and insubstantial.
  950. I look forward to trying the Internet.
  951. I learned to work on a computer years before I was placed under house arrest. Fortunately I had two laptops when I was under house arrest – one an Apple and one a different operating system. I was very proud of that because I know how to use both systems.
  952. I knew some of the army quite well.
  953. I haven’t heard any music on the BBC World Service in a long time. Maybe I’m listening at the wrong times. But not one single piece of music.
  954. I have been free for more than a month. Some people may think that that is long enough. Others may think that that is not quite long enough.
  955. I felt that it was my duty not to senselessly waste my time. And since I didn’t want to waste my time, I tried to accomplish as much as possible.
  956. I feel that the BBC World Service is not as versatile as it used to be – or perhaps I’m not listening at the right times.
  957. I don’t want to see the military falling. I want to see the military rising to dignified heights of professionalism and true patriotism.
  958. I don’t want to be president, but I want to be free to decide whether or not I want to be president of this country.
  959. I don’t want Burma to be a basket case forever.
  960. I don’t understand why people say that I am full of courage. I feel terribly nervous.
  961. I don’t think you can work on feelings in politics, apart from anything else, political change can come very unexpectedly, sometimes overnight when you least expect it.
  962. I don’t think of myself as unbreakable. Perhaps I’m just rather flexible and adaptable.
  963. I don’t think I have achieved anything that I can really be proud of.
  964. I don’t believe in professional dissidents. I think it’s just a phase, like adolescence.
  965. I do protect human rights, and I hope I shall always be looked up as a champion of human rights.
  966. I do not hold to non-violence for moral reasons, but for political and practical reasons.
  967. I could listen to the radio and I had access to books from time to time. Not all the time.
  968. I am prepared to talk with anyone. I have no personal grudge toward anybody.
  969. I am not unaware of the saying that more tears have been shed over wishes granted than wishes denied.
  970. Humor is one of the best ingredients of survival.
  971. Human beings want to be free and however long they may agree to stay locked up, to stay oppressed, there will come a time when they say ‘That’s it.’ Suddenly they find themselves doing something that they never would have thought they would be doing, simply because of the human instinct that makes them turn their face towards freedom.
  972. Human beings the world over need freedom and security that they may be able to realize their full potential.
  973. History is always changing.
  974. Fundamental violations of human rights always lead to people feeling less and less human.
  975. Freedom and democracy are dreams you never give up.
  976. Frankly, if you do politics, you should not be thinking about your dignity.
  977. For me, ‘revolution’ simply means radical change.
  978. Fires of suffering and strife are raging around the world.
  979. Every government must consider the security of the country. That is just part of the responsibilities of any government. But true security can only come out of unity within a country where there are so many ethnic nationalities.
  980. Even one voice can be heard loudly all over the world in this day and age.
  981. Dissidents can’t be dissidents forever; we are dissidents because we don’t want to be dissidents.
  982. Democracy is when the people keep a government in check.
  983. Confidence-building is not something that can go on forever. If it goes on forever then it becomes counterproductive.
  984. By helping others, you will learn how to help yourselves.
  985. Burmese authors and artists can play the role that artists everywhere play. They help to mold the outlook of a society – not the whole outlook, and they are not the only ones to mold the outlook of society, but they have an important role to play there.
  986. Books always help.
  987. At this age, I should be leading a quiet life.
  988. Assuming the chairmanship of ASEAN isn’t going to do anything about improving the lives of people.
  989. As long as there is no law in Burma, any individual here can be arrested at any time.
  990. All repressive laws must be revoked, and laws introduced to protect the rights of the people.
  991. All military regimes use security as the reason why they should remain in power. It’s nothing original.
  992. After all it was my father who founded the Burmese army and I do have a sense of warmth towards the Burmese army.
  993. A revolution simply means great change, significant change, and that’s how I’m defining it – great change for the better, brought about through non-violent means.
  994. A more significant phase should mean serious political dialogue.
  995. A family is very special. So when a family splits up, it’s not good, it’s never good.
  996. Young people, some of whom are not born into the faith, are being fired up by preachers using basic Islamic scripture and mobilized to wage jihad by radical imams who represent themselves as legitimate Muslim clergymen.
  997. You have to let individuals make their own choices and respect that, even if it’s your own child. And that’s what was taken away from me. My father passed away thinking I still had to go back to his way of believing.
  998. With the first commandment, Mohammed tried to imprison common sense. And with the second commandment, the beautiful, romantic side of mankind was enslaved.
  999. When your life is threatened, whether it’s by human beings or by disease or whatever, you come to appreciate life.
  1000. When a ‘Life of Brian’ comes out with Muhammad in the lead role, directed by an Arab equivalent of Theo van Gogh, it will be a huge step forward.