1. William Maxwell’s my favorite North American writer, I think. And an Irish writer who used to write for ‘The New Yorker’ called Maeve Brennan, and Mary Lavin, another Irish writer. There were a lot of writers that I found in ‘The New Yorker’ in the Fifties who wrote about the same type of material I did – about emotions and places.
  2. Why do I like to write short stories? Well, I certainly didn’t intend to. I was going to write a novel. And still! I still come up with ideas for novels. And I even start novels. But something happens to them. They break up. I look at what I really want to do with the material, and it never turns out to be a novel.
  3. While working on my first five books, I kept wishing I was writing a novel. I thought until you wrote a novel, you weren’t taken seriously as a writer. It used to trouble me a lot, but nothing troubles me now, and besides, there has been a change. I think short stories are taken more seriously now than they were.
  4. When you are young, you cannot imagine being disabled. You imagine you would conquer it somehow. As I’ve got older, I can imagine it; I can see how life narrows in. I feel compassion for my mother now.
  5. When I was into my 30s, I became increasingly depressed by rejection letters. I had had the feeling that by the time I was 30, I would be established. But I was not at all. By the time of ‘Lives of Girls and Women,’ I was into my 40s and I had become more thin-skinned.
  6. Time is something that interests me a whole lot – past and present, and how the past appears as people change.
  7. The stories are not autobiographical, but they’re personal in that way. I seem to know only the things that I’ve learned. Probably some things through observation, but what I feel I know surely is personal.
  8. The deep, personal material of the latter half of your life is your children. You can write about your parents when they’re gone, but your children are still going to be here, and you’re going to want them to come and visit you in the nursing home.
  9. The complexity of things – the things within things – just seems to be endless. I mean nothing is easy, nothing is simple.
  10. That’s something I think is growing on me as I get older: happy endings.
  11. Sometimes I get the start of a story from a memory, an anecdote, but that gets lost and is usually unrecognizable in the final story.
  12. Some of the stories I admire seem to zero in on one particular time and place. There isn’t a rule about this. But there’s a tidy sense about many stories I read. In my own work, I tend to cover a lot of time and to jump back and forward in time, and sometimes the way I do this is not very straightforward.
  13. People are more aware now of cities and of different ways of life. I suppose the writing I do is a bit in the past, and I’m not sure it’s the kind of writing I would do if I were starting now.
  14. One is lucky to be born in a place where no one is doing it, because then you can say, ‘Well, obviously I can write better than everyone else in high school.’ You have no idea of the competition.
  15. Naturally, my stories are about women – I’m a woman. I don’t know what the term is for men who write mostly about men. I’m not always sure what is meant by ‘feminist.’ In the beginning, I used to say, ‘Well, of course I’m a feminist.’ But if it means that I follow a kind of feminist theory, or know anything about it, then I’m not.
  16. My mother, I suppose, is still a main figure in my life because her life was so sad and unfair, and she so brave, but also because she was determined to make me into the Sunday-school-recitation little girl I was, from the age of seven or so, fighting not to be.
  17. Mothers and daughters generally have fairly complex relationships, and ours was made much more so by Mother’s illness. She had Parkinson’s disease, which was not diagnosed for a long time… All that made me very self-protective, because for one thing, I didn’t want to get trapped.
  18. Memory is the way we keep telling ourselves our stories – and telling other people a somewhat different version of our stories.
  19. Maybe I should say that memory interests me a great deal, because I think we all tell stories of our lives to ourselves as well as to other people. Well, women do, anyway. Women do this a lot. And I think when men get older, they do this too, but maybe in slightly different terms.
  20. It’s not possible to advise a young writer because every young writer is so different. You might say, ‘Read,’ but a writer can read too much and be paralyzed. Or, ‘Don’t read, don’t think, just write,’ and the result could be a mountain of drivel.
  21. In twenty years I’ve never had a day when I didn’t have to think about someone else’s needs. And this means the writing has to be fitted around it.
  22. In those early days, the important thing was the happy ending. I did not tolerate unhappy endings – for my heroines, anyway. And later on, I began to read things like ‘Wuthering Heights,’ and very, very unhappy endings would take place, so I changed my ideas completely and went in for the tragic, which I enjoyed.
  23. In my own work, I tend to cover a lot of time and to jump back and forward in time, and sometimes the way I do this is not very straightforward.
  24. In many ways, I’ve been writing personal stories all my life.
  25. I’ve often made revisions at that stage that turned out to be mistakes because I wasn’t really in the rhythm of the story anymore. I see a little bit of writing that doesn’t seem to be doing as much work as it should be doing, and right at the end, I will sort of rev it up. But when I finally read the story again, it seems a bit obtrusive.
  26. I’ve lived in a big showplace house, and I never want to live again in a house that overshadows me.
  27. I’m always trying. Between every book, I think, ‘Well now, it’s time to get down to the serious stuff.’
  28. I was brought up to believe that the worst thing you could do was ‘call attention to yourself,’ or ‘think you were smart.’ My mother was an exception to this rule and was punished by the early onset of Parkinson’s disease.
  29. I was a housewife, so I learned to write in times off, and I don’t think I ever gave it up, though there were times when I was very discouraged because I began to see that the stories I was writing were not very good, that I had a lot to learn, and that it was a much, much harder job than I had expected.
  30. I was a grade B housewife, maybe a B minus. But when I got time to write, I would be unable to finish a sentence. I had anxiety attacks. Partly it was a way of personifying the situation because I couldn’t breathe. I was surrounded by people and by duties. I was a housewife and the children’s mother, and I was judged on how I performed those roles.
  31. I want the reader to feel something is astonishing – not the ‘what happens’ but the way everything happens. These long short story fictions do that best, for me.
  32. I think, when you are growing up, you have to pull apart from what your mother wants or needs. You’ve got to go your own way, and that’s what I did.
  33. I think, often, people who run away are people who got into things most enthusiastically, and then they want more. They just demand more of life than what is happening in the moment. Sometimes this is a great mistake, as it’s always a good deal different than you expect it.
  34. I think any life can be interesting, any surroundings can be interesting. I don’t think I could have been so brave if I had been living in a town, competing with people on what can be called a generally higher cultural level.
  35. I seem to turn out stories that violate the discipline of the short story form and don’t obey the rules of progression for novels. I don’t think about a particular form: I think more about fiction, let’s say a chunk of fiction.
  36. I read all the time, and I’m often struck by something I’m reading.
  37. I no longer feel attracted to the well-made novel. I want to write the story that will zero in and give you intense, but not connected, moments of experience. I guess that’s the way I see life. People remake themselves bit by bit and do things they don’t understand.
  38. I never start out with any kind of connecting theme or plan. Everything just falls the way it falls. I don’t ever think about what kind of fiction I write or what I am writing about or what I am trying to write about. When I’m writing, what I do is I think about a story that I want to tell.
  39. I like gaps; all my stories have gaps. It seems this is the way people’s lives present themselves.
  40. I have never kept diaries. I just remember a lot and am more self-centered than most people.
  41. I had my first baby at twenty-one.
  42. I got interested in reading very early, because a story was read to me, by Hans Christian Andersen, which was ‘The Little Mermaid,’ and I don’t know if you remember ‘The Little Mermaid,’ but it’s dreadfully sad. The little mermaid falls in love with this prince, but she cannot marry him because she is a mermaid.
  43. I found it hard to be young. When I was married in my twenties, I hated being regarded as ‘the little wife.’ You don’t know what it was like then! I’d never even written a cheque. I had to ask my husband for money for groceries.
  44. I feel that I’ve done what I wanted to do, and that makes me feel fairly content.
  45. I don’t think that much about my relationship with my mother and what it did to me. I sometimes feel terrible regret about her, what her life must have been like. Often, when I’m enjoying something, I think of how meager her rewards were and how much courage, in a way, she needed to go on living.
  46. I can’t play bridge. I don’t play tennis. All those things that people learn, and I admire, there hasn’t seemed time for. But what there is time for is looking out the window.
  47. I can have people around a lot more because I’m not always chasing them away so I can work on my novel. My non-novel, I mean.
  48. Housework never really bothered me… what bothered me about it later was that it was expected to be your life… when you’re a housewife, you are constantly interrupted. You have no space in your life. It isn’t the fact that you do the laundry.
  49. For a long time, I had the idea that I would do a certain amount of work the best I could, and then I would reach a comfort zone, and I wouldn’t be pushed to write more. I would become a different person. It’s a surprise to me that this hasn’t happened. Your body ages, but your mind is the same.
  50. Charlotte Bronte was writing about sex. I supposed Jane Austen was, too. Where do you get a hero like Darcy unless you are writing about sex?
  51. ‘The New Yorker’ was really my first experience with serious editing. Previously, I’d more or less just had copyediting with a few suggestions – not much.
  52. ‘Royal Beatings’ was my first story, and it was published in 1977. But I sent all my early stories to ‘The New Yorker’ in the 1950s, and then I stopped sending for a long time and sent only to magazines in Canada. ‘The New Yorker’ sent me nice notes, though – penciled, informal messages. They never signed them. They weren’t terribly encouraging.
  53. ‘Lives’ is one of those books I should really have written when I was younger. It is the classic childhood, adolescence, breakthrough-into-maturity book. Every beginning writer has that material – and after that, you’re not sure what you can do.
  54. We all work hard to understand the dynamic relationship we have with a parent.
  55. To me, the idea of heaven would give you certain pleasures, certain joys – but it’s very important to have an intellectual understanding of why you want those things.
  56. The relationship with the words someone uses is more intimate and integrated than just a quick read and a blurb can ever be. This intimacy – the words on the page being sent back and forth from engaged editor to open author – is unique in my experience.
  57. It’s hard, because when you talk about process or your characters ruling your narrative, it sounds like you have no control, but obviously you’re ultimately the author, so you do have control.
  58. In my 20s, I railed against anything ‘spiritual’; I thought it was all crap.
  59. I’m gradually working through my obsessions, and maybe, when they’re all free and clear, I’ll write a comedy. But I’m not there yet.
  60. I’d like to go back to poetry again. I really, really revere good poetry. It’s been my private discipline.
  61. I went to church irregularly and was mostly reading comics in the pew.
  62. I was motivated to write about violence because I believe it’s not unusual. I see it as just a part of life, and I think we get in trouble when we separate people who’ve experienced it from those who haven’t.
  63. I wanted to be the moron of the family, because morons seemed to have more fun, more freedom and more personality.
  64. I wanted to be a novelist for so long.
  65. I wake up very early in the morning. I like to start in the dark, and I never work at night, because my brain is evaporated by 4 P.M.
  66. I think you only learn what kind of personality you have by committing to things.
  67. I think understanding is the way to gain perspective – and therefore can live among those hideous realities. You can live with them.
  68. I think it’s an interesting thing to me, because we have this desire for everything to be explained to us. But if you go through your daily actions, very little ends up having a written-down explanation for why things happen, or why people do specific things.
  69. I like gardening – it’s a place where I find myself when I need to lose myself.
  70. I have never been shy about listening to the input of others and weighing it seriously.
  71. I have always felt extremely weird. But I am very happy with my weirdnesses, and I want other people to be very happy with theirs.
  72. I find talking about my work harder than it might be if honesty wasn’t my calling card.
  73. I don’t think ignorance is a way that you gain distance on something.
  74. I always had that sense of being censored for the things that I thought. Why is it wrong to embroider your pants, or paint with acrylics on your clothing? Why is that weird? Isn’t it weirder to want to be like everyone else?
  75. For me, heaven would be a lack of alienation. The whole time I was growing up, I felt comfort was inherently evil. I think that, for me, heaven isn’t about couches and milk shakes and never having a troubling thought again.
  76. Depending on where I am in the process, sometimes I have a page count and sometimes I don’t. Sometimes I have an hour count; sometimes I’m just happy to string a few words together. I do keep pretty rigorous hours, because otherwise you never get anything done.
  77. Your opinion is not influenced by anyone when you’re alone at a matinee. It’s just you and the movie.
  78. You wanna do a lot of backstory for your character – as an actor, you wanna research that. But on the show, it’s fun to remain in that naive place as you go along, and be able to continue to discover things about your character as the writers come up with them.
  79. You know, ‘Mad Men’ is notoriously secretive with its plotlines, even with exposing them to actors on the show.
  80. What is it about women that they just go right for the guy that totally repulses them?
  81. Twitter is the first information that I ingest in the morning. When there are important things happening, friends of mine who follow news feeds will report on it, so I find out about most major news on Twitter.
  82. Ted Danson is amazing. He’s incredible.
  83. My parents are definitely reformed hippies.
  84. My first TV job was on an episode of ‘Hannah Montana’… Since then, I’ve been fortunate to end up on shows that are just such a high quality, where the writing and material is incredible.
  85. Money means better meals at better places.
  86. In my personal life, I’m hilarious! I was always a bit of a jokester.
  87. If you’re a guy, you should get girls flowers all the time. They never get old and you can never get them enough. I’m never disappointed when I get flowers. I always thought guys who don’t buy women flowers are such fools. All it takes is one. A little goes a long way with flowers.
  88. I’ve always loved film and wanted to work in film. I just love working and creating new characters, and trying different genres and different things. For me, I just love to work and I love movies.
  89. I’ve always loved film and wanted to work in film. I just love working and creating new characters, and trying different genres and different things.
  90. I’m really not a TV junkie… OK, I kind of am a TV junkie, but I’m much more of a movie junkie – my junk food is romantic comedies I’ve seen a million times.
  91. I’m a generally optimistic person.
  92. I was always a bit of a jokester.
  93. I try to be very much in control when it comes to work. I have a strong work ethic.
  94. I think that a big part of comedy is being made fun of, and it is looking silly or looking stupid.
  95. I think it’s never too late to learn – or it’s a lesson that’s good to continue learning – that you need to treat everyone on a set with respect.
  96. I think it’s important to be honest with yourself about what you want and it’s important to be honest with your partner about what you need.
  97. I think Twitter is such a cool thing because it really is a direct line to the fans and for fans back to you, and it’s such a new thing. I think in the past there’s been usually fan mail and that’s really good, but Twitter, it gets an immediate response.
  98. I think I used to be lower maintenance. I think I’m slowly becoming higher maintenance.
  99. I love Jason Bateman. He’s so funny.
  100. I look really good in a scuba suit.
  101. I like to have my breakfast in bed, and I use that time to watch the recorded shows on my TiVo. I seldom watch shows in real time – I’m always at work.
  102. I like to be in pain when I’m getting massaged. That way I know I’m getting my money’s worth.
  103. I like that ‘Mad Men’ is now an adjective I use to describe clothing when I’m shopping: ‘I like this top. It’s very ‘Mad Men.’
  104. I kind of love going to weddings – it’s a guilty pleasure. I’ve never been the wedding-y type girl dreaming about the big day, the dress, but I always cry. Always. Even if I don’t know the bride that well, I’m verklempt!
  105. I get pigeonholed into type-A personality characters, but I’m really not type A. I’m kind of a spaz.
  106. I feel like any time John Oliver is added to something, the comedy is instantly there. He’s so funny.
  107. I enjoy doing drama, and I enjoy doing comedy equally.
  108. I don’t know much about writing a show or being a show-runner on a show, but I can only imagine that when you first cast a show and you first do a pilot, there are so many components that you’re throwing into the mix and you’re not sure how they’re going to develop.
  109. I always wanted to play a mental patient. I was fascinated with playing crazy people in college, and I don’t know if I ever quite perfected it.
  110. Honestly, my favorite kind of dancing is just lettin’ loose. There’s something great about the carefree flinging of your body to great music. It can be so joyous.
  111. A wedding, people decide to get married, it comes out of such love for one another and then women can turn into these other people. They’re planning something that’s the biggest event they’ll ever plan in their lives and it turns them into this other person, so it’s not totally the guy’s fault that he’s feeling disconnected from this person.
  112. A lot of people come to Los Angeles and think that they’re going to be famous, just like that.
  113. ’30 Rock’ is probably one of my favorite shows. It’s just joke after joke after joke.
  114. Young children seem to be learning who to share this toy with and figure out how it works, while adolescents seem to be exploring some very deep and profound questions: ‘How should this society work? How should relationships among people work?’ The exploration is: ‘Who am I, what am I doing?’
  115. When nobody read, dyslexia wasn’t a problem. When most people had to hunt, a minor genetic variation in your ability to focus attention was hardly a problem, and may even have been an advantage. When most people have to make it through high school, the same variation can become a genuinely life-altering disease.
  116. What, of course, we want in a university is for people to learn the skills they’re going to need outside the classroom. So, having a system that had more emphasis on inquiry and exploration but also on learning and practising specific skills would fit much better with how we know people learn.
  117. What we want in students is creativity and a willingness to fail. I always say to students, ‘If you’ve never at some point stayed up all night talking to your new boyfriend about the meaning of life instead of preparing for the test, then you’re not really an intellectual.’
  118. What teenagers want most of all are social rewards, especially the respect of their peers.
  119. What makes knowledge automatic is what gets you to Carnegie Hall – practice, practice, practice.
  120. What happens when children reach puberty earlier and adulthood later? The answer is: a good deal of teenage weirdness.
  121. We say that children are bad at paying attention, but we really mean that they’re bad at not paying attention – they easily get distracted by anything interesting.
  122. We learn differently as children than as adults. For grown-ups, learning a new skill is painful, attention-demanding, and slow. Children learn unconsciously and effortlessly.
  123. We know what makes babies smart and happy and thrive. It’s having human beings who are dedicated to caring for them – human beings who are well supported, not stressed out and not poor.
  124. We have lots of evidence that putting investments in early childhood education, even evidence from very hard-nosed economists, is one of the very best investments that the society can possibly make. And yet we still don’t have public support for things like preschools.
  125. We fear death so profoundly, not because it means the end of our body, but because it means the end of our consciousness – better to be a spirit in Heaven than a zombie on Earth.
  126. We do nothing for children between the ages of zero and five. And we seem to be quite happy to have children growing up in not just poverty, which wouldn’t be so bad, but isolation, lack of people around them, lack of support, lack of ability to go out and play in the dirt.
  127. The youngest children have a great capacity for empathy and altruism. There’s a recent study that shows even 14-month-olds will climb across a bunch of cushions and go across a room to give you a pen if you drop one.
  128. The thing that is most important is having people who are involved and engaged with the kids and also are not stressed and can be involved with them. And that’s actually not boring and banal. That actually takes a lot of work to make that happen, and it’s not something that our society does very well at all.
  129. The science can tell you that the thousands of pseudo-scientific parenting books out there – not to mention the ‘Baby Einstein’ DVDs and the flash cards and the brain-boosting toys – won’t do a thing to make your baby smarter. That’s largely because babies are already as smart as they can be; smarter than we are in some ways.
  130. The real excitement is collaborating with computer scientists and neuroscientists and starting to understand in detail how children learn so much so quickly.
  131. The radio was an improvement on the telegraph but it didn’t have the same exponential, transformative effect.
  132. The brain knows the real secret of seduction, more effective than even music and martinis. Just keep whispering, ‘Gee, you are really special’ to that sack of water and protein that is a body, and you can get it to do practically anything.
  133. The brain is highly structured, but it is also extremely flexible. It’s not a blank slate, but it isn’t written in stone, either.
  134. The best scientific way to discover if one factor influences another is to do a controlled experiment.
  135. The ancient media of speech and song and theater were radically reshaped by writing, though they were never entirely supplanted, a comfort perhaps to those of us who still thrill to the smell of a library.
  136. Texts and e-mails travel no faster than phone calls and telegrams, and their content isn’t necessarily richer or poorer.
  137. Teaching is a very effective way to get children to learn something specific – this tube squeaks, say, or a squish then a press then a pull causes the music to play. But it also makes children less likely to discover unexpected information and to draw unexpected conclusions.
  138. Successful creative adults seem to combine the wide-ranging exploration and openness we see in children with the focus and discipline we see in adults.
  139. Something like reading depends a lot on just having people around you who talk to you and read you books, more than sitting down and, say, doing a reading drill when you’re 3 or 4 years old.
  140. Siblings are the guarantors that the private childhood world – so unlike the adult world that scientists are only just beginning to understand it – is a fully shared and objective one.
  141. Scientists learn about the world in three ways: They analyze statistical patterns in the data, they do experiments, and they learn from the data and ideas of other scientists. The recent studies show that children also learn in these ways.
  142. Scientists and philosophers tend to treat knowledge, imagination and love as if they were all very separate parts of human nature. But when it comes to children, all three are deeply entwined. Children learn the truth by imagining all the ways the world could be, and testing those possibilities.
  143. Samuel Johnson called it the vanity of human wishes, and Buddhists talk about the endless cycle of desire. Social psychologists say we get trapped on a hedonic treadmill. What they all mean is that we wish, plan and work for things that we think will make us happy, but when we finally get them, we aren’t nearly as happy as we thought we’d be.
  144. Putting together philosophy and children would have been difficult for most of history. But very fortunately for me, when I started graduate school there was a real scientific revolution taking place in developmental psychology.
  145. Overall, female scientists have fewer resources than male scientists, just as poor people have less access to health care. But if you compare male and female scientists with identical resources, you find that the women are just as likely to be successful.
  146. Ours is an age of pedagogy. Anxious parents instruct their children more and more, at younger and younger ages, until they’re reading books to babies in the womb.
  147. Our babies are like penguins; penguin babies can’t exist unless more than one person is taking care of them. They just can’t keep going.
  148. One of the things I say is, ‘You want to know what it’s like to be a baby? It’s like being in love for the first time in Paris after four double espressos.’ And boy, you are alive and conscious.
  149. One of the things I say is from an evolutionary point of view: probably the ideal rich environment for a baby includes more mud, livestock, and relatives than most of us could tolerate nowadays.
  150. One of the most distinctive evolutionary features of human beings is our unusually long, protected childhood.
  151. One of the best ways of understanding human nature is to study children. After all, if we want understand who we are, we should find out how we got to be that way.
  152. On the Web we all become small-town visitors lost in the big city.
  153. Many philosophers say it’s impossible to explain our conscious experience in scientific, biological terms at all. But that’s not exactly true. Scientists have explained why we have certain experiences and not others. It’s just that they haven’t explained the special features of consciousness that philosophers care about.
  154. Like most parents, I think, my children have been the source of some of my most intense joys and despairs, my deepest moral dilemmas and greatest moral achievements.
  155. Knowing what to expect from a teacher is a really good thing, of course: It lets you get the right answers more quickly than you would otherwise.
  156. In most places and times in human history, babies have had not just one person but lots of people around who were really paying attention to them around, dedicated to them, cared to them, were related to them. I think the big shift in our culture is the isolation in which many children are growing up.
  157. Imagine if baseball were taught the way science is taught in most inner-city schools. Schoolchildren would get lectures about the history of the World Series. High school students would occasionally reproduce famous plays of the past. Nobody would get in the game themselves until graduate school.
  158. Imaginary friends are one of the weirder forms of pretend play in childhood. But the research shows that imaginary friends actually help children understand the other people around them and imagine all the many ways that people could be.
  159. If you wanted to design a robot that could learn as well as it possibly could, you might end up with something that looked a lot like a 3-year-old.
  160. If you just, pretty much, take a random 15-month-old, just sit and watch them for 10 minutes and count out how many experiments, how much thinking you see going on, and it will put the most brilliant scientist to shame.
  161. If you just casually look at a baby, it doesn’t look like there’s very much going on there, but they know more and learn more than we would ever have thought. Every single minute is incredibly full of thought and novelty. It’s easy as adults to take for granted everything it took to arrive at the state where we are.
  162. If parents are the fixed stars in the child’s universe, the vaguely understood, distant but constant celestial spheres, siblings are the dazzling, sometimes scorching comets whizzing nearby.
  163. I’ve had three of my own children and spent my professional life thinking about children. And yet I still find my relation to my children deeply puzzling.
  164. I’m the oldest of six children and I had my own first baby when I was 23. So I’ve always been interested in babies, and I had lots of opportunities to watch them.
  165. I’m afraid the parenting advice to come out of developmental psychology is very boring: pay attention to your kids and love them.
  166. I wanted to answer big questions about humanity, about how it is that we understand about the world, how we can know as much as we do, why human nature is the way that it is. And it always seemed to me that you find answers to those questions by looking at children.
  167. I think universities are trying to figure out how we could use what we know about learning to change our education system, but it is sort of funny that they don’t necessarily seem to be consulting the people who are sitting right there on campus.
  168. Historically, absolute IQ scores have risen substantially as we’ve changed our environment so that more people go to school longer.
  169. From an evolutionary perspective children are, literally, designed to learn. Childhood is a special period of protected immaturity. It gives the young breathing time to master the things they will need to know in order to survive as adults.
  170. For better or worse, we live in possible worlds as much as actual ones. We are cursed by that characteristically human guilt and regret about what might have been in the past. But that may be the cost for our ability to hope and plan for what might be in the future.
  171. Even the very youngest children already are perfectly able to discriminate between the imaginary and the real, whether in books or movies or in their own pretend play. Children with the most elaborate and beloved imaginary friends will gently remind overenthusiastic adults that these companions are, after all, just pretend.
  172. Each new generation of children grows up in the new environment its parents have created, and each generation of brains becomes wired in a different way. The human mind can change radically in just a few generations.
  173. Developmental scientists like me explore the basic science of learning by designing controlled experiments.
  174. Culture is our nature, and the ability to learn and change is our most important and fundamental instinct.
  175. Children have a very good idea of how to distinguish between fantasies and realities. It’s just they are equally interested in exploring both.
  176. Childhood is a fundamental part of all human lives, parents or not, since that’s how we all start out. And yet babies and young children are so mysterious and puzzling and even paradoxical.
  177. Being a developmental psychologist didn’t make me any better at dealing with my own children, no. I muddled through, and, believe me, fretted and worried with the best of them.
  178. Becoming an adult means leaving the world of your parents and starting to make your way toward the future that you will share with your peers.
  179. Because we imagine, we can have invention and technology. It’s actually play, not necessity, that is the mother of invention.
  180. Babies and young children are like the research and development division of the human species, and we grown-ups are production and marketing.
  181. Asking questions is what brains were born to do, at least when we were young children. For young children, quite literally, seeking explanations is as deeply rooted a drive as seeking food or water.
  182. As adults, when we attend to something in the world we are vividly conscious of that particular thing, and we shut out the surrounding world. The classic metaphor is that attention is like a spotlight, illuminating one part of the world and leaving the rest in darkness.
  183. Animals are certainly more sophisticated than we used to think. And we shouldn’t lump together animals as a group. Crows and chimps and dogs are all highly intelligent in very different ways.
  184. Adults often assume that most learning is the result of teaching and that exploratory, spontaneous learning is unusual. But actually, spontaneous learning is more fundamental.
  185. A theory not only explains the world we see, it lets us imagine other worlds, and, even more significantly, lets us act to create those worlds. Developing everyday theories, like scientific theories, has allowed human beings to change the world.
  186. Yoga is my luxury workout. If I’m on vacation or I have a day off, I love a 90-minute yoga class. It’s a really strong workout, but it takes a little bit longer.
  187. Working towards something you’re excited about – as opposed to something that makes you feel badly about yourself – is what will keep you going back to the gym.
  188. With reality TV, sometimes it’s amazing chemistry and you get these gems that turn out to be everything you hoped, and the camera loves them and they just blossom on the show. And then sometimes it’s not all you envision.
  189. When I was a kid, there was teasing in school. Then when I was a teenager on ‘Days of Our Lives,’ I certainly experienced hurtful comments from ‘fans’ of the show.
  190. When I saw contestants fighting for their lives on ‘The Biggest Loser,’ I realized I just wanted to be healthy – to have fun playing soccer with my son or teaching my daughter to shoot hoops. Then it was so much easier to say no to carbs, soda, or dessert, and the weight just came off.
  191. What’s wrong with extreme dieting and hard-core fitness plans is that they don’t take into account the rest of your life.
  192. We watch a lot of Discovery Channel, shows like ‘The Biggest Loser’ and even ‘Amazing Race.’ You learn a lot about the world, it’s fun and nobody’s interested in beating anybody down. And then the opposite: I’m a huge fan of ‘Survivor.’
  193. We talk a lot on ‘Biggest Loser’ about how fitness is a natural antidepressant, how it burns off stress. What I like about running is that it gives me time alone. I’m always busy, with people at work, with my kids. I love getting out for a run by myself and just listening to my music.
  194. We have stay-in date nights where we make a plan to watch certain TV shows together. ‘Survivor,’ for example, is our favorite show. And I make a healthy dinner and we sit down and it’s our date. I love it.
  195. There are times, like after a long day of work, when the thought of an easy drive-through is enticing. But then I remember how crappy I felt when I ate fast food in the past, and it inspires me to head to the grocery store or my local farmer’s market and whip up an easy but healthier option.
  196. The number one mistake is giving pets table scraps. I made the mistake thinking I was showing my dog love by giving her food and treats. You see a tiny 4 oz. piece of cheese, but for a Boston Terrier like mine, that’s like one and a half hamburgers. That’s unhealthy.
  197. Thank God my life is normal. I work hard to make it normal. My husband and I don’t want Hollywood drama. I go to the market and do the dishes. I’m not treated differently because I work on TV.
  198. Sunscreen is my number 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 tip. I’m a fanatic, partially because I live in L.A. and have fair skin and freckles, and partially because of my kids. My mom always made me wear sunscreen and I’m trying to be that mom for them.
  199. Spinning has been such an amazing part of my exercise. I love the music, the energy, and the sweat. It’s a tough class, which makes me feel like I’ve really accomplished something. It’s a great way to burn fat and lean out the body. An all-around win!
  200. Sally Field looks amazing in general, never mind her age! She’s a phenomenally talented actress and has had a career spanning so many decades.
  201. People think, ‘Oh, I’m loving myself by sitting on this sofa for four hours.’ Love yourself enough to get up!
  202. Our pets rely on us entirely for their nutrition. So if you’re making your own judgments, that could lead to a mistake. At the same time, we have more control over our pet’s diet than we do with our children or with ourselves, so your vet can tell you what is appropriate for your dog and you can assign them that.
  203. One of the things I like best about ‘Biggest Loser’ is being around people who are trying to make the right choices. When you feel defeated about your weight and your health, like there’s no hope, and you still make the choice to fight for it, to make the change happen no matter what people say or think, that’s inspiring to me.
  204. My husband and I have known each other since kindergarten. I had a crush on him in school, but we never dated. Then we saw each other again after high school, and there was something instantly familiar about him. I’m a very shy person and was very closed off. But he allowed me to be myself. And there’s a safety in that.
  205. My husband and I both have our bucket lists. Running a marathon was on mine.
  206. My DVR says that I watch a lot of TV my husband likes.
  207. Kids don’t eat fast. They take their time; they talk and laugh. Sometimes it’s really annoying, because you’re like, ‘Come on, it’s bedtime!’ But try it: You’ll fill up before you know it, because it takes 20 minutes for your brain to know your stomach is full.
  208. It’s not weird to look at yourself in the mirror at the gym – that’s why they’re there! You have to make sure that you’re doing things right.
  209. It’s funny because I’m a sucker for glitz and glitter when it comes to clothes and nail polish, but with my makeup, I’m more comfortable with a natural look. It feels more like me.
  210. If you’re sitting in front of the TV, you can’t have ice cream. But if you’re running around all day, then yeah, you can.
  211. If you’re going to saute something, lightly spray olive oil in the pan or on veggies before you serve them. It adds a nice flavor. We grill a lot, so I’ll use a little on my corn or my shrimp.
  212. I’ve met so many fans of daytime television who’ve watched the shows with their moms and grandmas and feel like they’ve known the characters their whole lives. It’s sad for them to have to say goodbye to their favorite soaps and characters. We don’t want that to happen to the ‘Days’ fans.
  213. I’ve been on ‘Days’ since I was 16, and being surrounded by such thin, gorgeous actresses made me so insecure and self-conscious.
  214. I’ve actually suffered from allergies my entire life. My mom had allergies, so I was aware of what an issue they can be. Many people allow their allergies to affect their lives. As a mom with two kids and two jobs, I just can’t let allergies slow me down. It’s a day to day thing that can really be remedied by finding the right medication.
  215. I’m so busy and there’s so much going on, that the gym or a workout can’t be a last minute thought, like, ‘I have nothing to do today I’m going to go to the gym.’ Now it’s, ‘When am I going to find time to work out tomorrow?’
  216. I’m addicted to a really tough workout. I like to be drenched in sweat when I’m done because I feel accomplished.
  217. I’m a fan of daytime drama; I totally get it. When we are doing scenes that are romantic or will get the audience riled up, I feel like I’m a fan in the room going, ‘People are going to be so mad right now!’
  218. I’ll have wine or a piece of cake once in a while, but I don’t look at it as sliding backwards, even if I go a whole week without working out. I don’t dwell on it and beat myself up – I just try to have a healthier day tomorrow.
  219. I’ll do strength training in my dressing room between shoots, and I’ve been known to make business calls while out jogging. I try to mute myself on Bluetooth so they can’t hear me huffing and puffing, but I usually end up getting caught.
  220. I wasn’t eating the right kinds of calories. I didn’t know about healthy carbs such as brown rice and lentils. Now I eat small meals throughout the day: oatmeal with cinnamon to start, fruit and yogurt as a snack, and vegetables or with chicken or tuna, and a healthy carb, like a yam, for lunch.
  221. I was recently asked about the business side of ‘Biggest Loser,’ but as long as we entertain people, we can keep coming back and making a difference. It’s a delicate balance, but one feeds off the other. I feel so good about the show – it’s uplifting and inspiring and entertaining at the same time.
  222. I was never obese, but I felt ‘less than’ because I wasn’t as thin as other actresses. I totally fell for that low-fat craze. My goal was to be X jeans size or a specific number on the scale.
  223. I was definitely one of those people who fell for the fat-free cookies and chips that are loaded with sugar and calories.
  224. I take issue with those who criticize ‘The Biggest Loser’ for pushing contestants too hard. The whole point is to push them hard. Otherwise, there’s no change.
  225. I take Sudafed to combat my congestion, so I always carry some with me because I like to be prepared and make sure I’m ready whenever symptoms strike. It’s also a really good idea to figure out what your triggers are.
  226. I started running outside when I was at ‘Biggest Loser.’ Then I got runner’s knee, and thought I was never going to be able to shake it. When I overcame that and ran the L.A. Marathon, it was such an amazing thing, and now running is such a part of my routine.
  227. I save my dreams and hopes for my kids. When I’m making a wish under a bridge or tunnel, it’s always for them.
  228. I save every Christmas card. I keep them all.
  229. I recommend that people try new stuff or take new fitness classes all the time. It’s important to mix up your routine, not only for your body, but also for your mental state.
  230. I maintain by going to spin four or five days a week. I love that I can get a solid butt-kicking in 40 minutes. I also strength train two or three times a week.
  231. I love fresh vegetables and we always include them in our meals. I don’t force my kids to eat asparagus, but they do eat peas, broccoli, and carrots.
  232. I like to watch ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ when I’d doing cardio. But, sometimes I do need good music to get me moving. I like high energy songs by artists like Justin Timberlake and Rihanna.
  233. I like to keep almonds in my pantry. I also like to keep fruit on hand, just different types depending on the season. And string cheese – that’s a really good one.
  234. I like Burt’s Bees Tinted Lip Balm because I don’t need a mirror to reapply. But I definitely treat myself with face lotion – I use La Mer.
  235. I know most Americans don’t have this luxury, but we are in Los Angeles and are lucky enough to be able to grill outside almost all year long. It’s my favorite way of preparation because it’s so clean and it gives it such a great flavor. You need very little oil and the protein can be really cleanly prepared and perfectly cooked.
  236. I have two beautiful children and my husband. The perfect day for me is just to be with them and have fun. We like simple things, you know.
  237. I have encouraged my kids to eat well from day one. I add flavor – herbs and spices – to everything because I don’t want them getting used to starchy, bland food. I also want them to experiment – they don’t have to love everything, but they do have to try it.
  238. I eat a lot of fruit after I run. I find that hydrates me better than just drinking water. I have fruit already cut up for after a run, so when I’m done I can chow on cantaloupe or watermelon. It’s so satisfying, and that probably keeps me from being too hungry for other things.
  239. I do a lot of cardio. I think it’s super important, especially for women. I don’t have a tremendous amount of time to work out, so I find myself cramming in a cardio because that’s all I can fit in. I think that if you don’t have a lot of time, that it’s the cleanest way to burn a few calories.
  240. I battled with my weight as a teenager, partly because there wasn’t the information or conversation about how to live a healthy lifestyle.
  241. I always cringe when people tell me they don’t eat breakfast, as though that’s a good thing. Eek! You have to start the day off with something in your stomach to get your metabolism active. Also, the mental game of ‘holding out,’ not eating for as long as possible, at least for me, was a really unhealthy mental place.
  242. Humans should always exercise and watch what they eat. So with your pet, make sure they get enough exercise, make sure they’re getting fed at the same time every day and getting the nutrition they need. And make sure they get a lot of love and attention you both need. That’s why you have them!
  243. Hey ‘Bachelor,’ take notes! Trusting one another and sharing a journey to health leads to lasting relationships!
  244. Fitness is not an option. It’s part of my job.
  245. Can you believe approximately 17 percent of American children ages 2 to 19 years are obese? How about this fact: approximately 60 percent of overweight children ages 5 to 10 already have at least one risk factor for heart disease? We are all to blame for this – parents, schools, kids – all of us.
  246. As soon as I made it about being healthy and shifted my focus away from the scale, the weight started to come off. I keep track of my body by how my jeans fit – and how I feel.
  247. ‘Days’ has always been strong as an icon in TV history, and it’s still going on strong and represents the genre of daytime drama so well. I’m proud to be a part of it.
  248. You shouldn’t eat anything new on race days. Eat simple foods, and ones that you can easily digest.
  249. Whenever we race in London, the noise of the fans gives me goosebumps.
  250. When you train seven days a week, you need good scenery to inspire you.
  251. When you ride fast and then rest for a bit, it causes a spike in your heart rate and helps your body deal with lactic acid. But you don’t need to make it too complicated. Yorkshire is perfect because the hills work as intervals – you ride up them hard and then recover before the next one. Or you can just sprint to the next tree or lamppost.
  252. We’re proud Yorkshiremen: we grew up fell running, and we still do it whenever we can. I did my first fell race when I was 11. It was a Tuesday night race called the Bunny Run, on a windswept moor above Haworth, and the prize was a chocolate egg.
  253. We are quite different: I’m relaxed, and I get ready for races really late, whereas Jonny is really organised and punctual. I like to lead from the front in the run, whereas Jonny might hold back. Maybe it’s because I’m the older brother, but I don’t think there is a mental block that stops Jonny doing the same. I just think I’m a bit more gung-ho.
  254. Triathlon is a sport where the legacy is obvious. Anyone can do it; there are loads you can do. It is a massive participation sport. You can do it as a challenge, for charity or whatever. I believe it will continue to grow, and I will look forward to that happening.
  255. Triathletes can push themselves quite hard, and I have seen people collapse on a barrier or pass out on a bike.
  256. The run’s the business end of a triathlon: it’s where you win or lose the race. I like to get out very hard, make other people hurt sometimes, and other times leave it to the last kilometre and really win the race there.
  257. The great thing about running is that you can get away to your own thoughts and get in a little bubble.
  258. The best thing about having your brother in the same sport as you means you can go out and train together every day, and we can push each other on. That’s something many of our rivals don’t have when training day in day out.
  259. Schools are really, really important. It gives you access to every kid in the country. It gives you a massive pool of people to see who might be talented at different sports. It allows kids to try sports. Kids can be inspired all they want, but if they can’t go out and try a sport, then it’s no good.
  260. Rio was always going to be on the schedule for me, whether I had won in London or not. Triathlon is one of those sports where the Olympics is always the most important and the most interesting race, and I always wanted to have a crack at Rio and defend my title.
  261. My school career was absolutely crucial to me. As an endurance athlete, some of the most important years are maybe when you are 16, 17, and 18. For me, getting that right was very important, and my school allowed me to do that.
  262. My first event was in Nottingham, aged 11, and the prize was a bike. I thought, ‘Wow.’ I had no idea what to wear. I think I did it in swimming trunks, then just put on a T-shirt and shoes for the bike part. Triathlons felt exotic. There was a technical and tactical aspect to it as well as the endurance challenge. I was hooked.
  263. London 2012 was the toughest time in our relationship but also the best. Things could get fractious – we were both competing for gold – but standing next to my brother on the start line for a home Olympics was so special. I remember saying: ‘Let’s go.’
  264. London 2012 was superb. It was the best triathlon experience in a million years.
  265. It’s good to put on some lube under your wetsuit, so I tend to use a lot of baby oil on my arms and legs. It stops you chafing and helps you get your wetsuit off after the swim.
  266. It’s better to train for 4-5 hours a week than to do ten hours one week then nothing for two weeks. It helps your body adapt and also maintains your fitness.
  267. I’m a Conservative. I don’t believe there should be too many rules. There should be lower taxes.
  268. I was lucky enough to go to a school which gave flexibility around education and sport. We had a 1-hour, 30-minute lunch break, and were able to train during this time.
  269. I was bribed into starting swimming with the promise of sweets and by being told that you can win medals. My mum had given me a bag of medals which she had won when she was young, so the idea of winning medals was very exciting.
  270. I wanted to be an endurance athlete from a young age. I remember being in a careers class at school and saying I wanted to be a professional athlete and the teacher replying, ‘You’re not going to make it; it’s not possible.’
  271. I knew I wanted to be a professional triathlete, but I didn’t know it was possible until I won the junior champs. My dad said I should give Cambridge a go to see if I could do both, but it was only ever a trial.
  272. I don’t know whether endurance sports attract obsessional people, or training for endurance sports makes people obsessional… it’s the chicken and the egg.
  273. I don’t believe in having a rest day.
  274. I did my first cross country race when I was about 10 and absolutely loved it. I wasn’t particularly good, so I didn’t just carry on because I was good, but it just really appealed to me.
  275. I did a term at Cambridge University studying medicine, so I could potentially have followed in Mum and Dad’s footsteps and become a doctor.
  276. As a family, we were always active. Lots of walking, lots of running as well as riding bikes with dad.
  277. We are like ignorant shepherds living on a site where great civilizations once flourished. The shepherds play with the fragments that pop up to the surface, having no notion of the beautiful structures of which they were once a part.
  278. There is one thing a professor can be absolutely certain of: almost every student entering the university believes, or says he believes, that truth is relative.
  279. There is no real teacher who in practice does not believe in the existence of the soul, or in a magic that acts on it through speech.
  280. The spirit is at home, if not entirely satisfied, in America.
  281. The real community of man is the community of those who seek the truth, of the potential knowers.
  282. The most important function of the university in an age of reason is to protect reason from itself.
  283. The liberally educated person is one who is able to resist the easy and preferred answers, not because he is obstinate but because he knows others worthy of consideration.
  284. The failure to read good books both enfeebles the vision and strengthens our most fatal tendency – the belief that the here and now is all there is.
  285. Students now arrive at the university ignorant and cynical about our political heritage, lacking the wherewithal to be either inspired by it or seriously critical of it.
  286. Rock gives children, on a silver platter, with all the public authority of the entertainment industry, everything their parents always used to tell them they had to wait for until they grew up and would understand later.
  287. Reason transformed into prejudice is the worst form of prejudice, because reason is the only instrument for liberation from prejudice.
  288. Reason cannot establish values, and its belief that it can is the stupidiest and most pernicious illusion.
  289. Only Socrates knew, after a lifetime of unceasing labor, that he was ignorant. Now every high-school student knows that. How did it become so easy?
  290. Nothing is more singular about this generation than its addiction to music.
  291. Fathers and mothers have lost the idea that the highest aspiration they might have for their children is for them to be wise… specialized competence and success are all that they can imagine.
  292. Education is the movement from darkness to light.
  293. Education in our times must try to find whatever there is in students that might yearn for completion, and to reconstruct the learning that would enable them autonomously to seek that completion.
  294. Authentic values are those by which a life can be lived, which can form a people that produces great deeds and thoughts.
  295. As soon as tradition has come to be recognized as tradition, it is dead.
  296. When it’s wet, you’re much more tense on the steering wheel, you have to dance with the throttle and the brakes more. Each lap is a different scenario, so you’re really on the edge of your nerves. One mistake could cost you the entire race.
  297. What I like is when you can hear the heart and soul of music and can feel the energy coming out of it, because that’s what it’s like when you drive.
  298. We’re involved in racing because there’s that element of competition. But there’s that desire to push yourself beyond the natural comfort zone and the boundaries that are preset if you like, and to be better than the rest.
  299. To be a racing driver it’s essential you have very good eyesight, and that’s especially relevant at night. Your senses are heightened, you’re travelling over 200mph, you need to focus on that 110-metre braking point and you have to have absolute faith and commitment in your driving.
  300. The most dangerous part of the race is early evening and especially early morning. It’s the twilight zone. Either you’re going into darkness and the sun is dropping down, or you’re coming out of the darkness and the sun is coming up. At the same time, you’ve got new drivers coming in and feeling their way around the circuit.
  301. The main factors in terms of how tiring a season can be are governed by the number of races and the length of time between the first and the last.
  302. My very first car was a grey Alfa Romeo Alfasud, which I got in 1987. But, in our family, all cars were for sale – so they might be there in the morning and were gone at night. In the mid-90s, I joined Porsche and the Carrera was the car, and the Carrera 4S was the one they gave me. As a wee boy from Dumfries, I couldn’t believe it.
  303. My motto is to do everything absolutely flat out and to the best of your ability.
  304. It was not until I started racing for car manufacturers that I found a car I could really get attached to. I am the son of a car dealer, so up until then, cars just came and went.
  305. It is hard to be number one, and it is even harder to stay there because everyone is trying to knock you off the top.
  306. I try to get away from the pits as quickly as I can. I speak to my engineer when I get out of the car, usually there’s some press to do, then I will go off and have a shower and get my dry, clean overalls and clothing on. I’ll have a massage, stretch and something to eat. I don’t sleep, but I try to close my eyes for a while.
  307. I think that texting and driving is a 100 percent no-go. I think it should be banned everywhere because you cannot be focused on looking ahead, in the mirrors, being aware of what’s around you, and to type on a small keyboard and a small screen.
  308. I think music can really affect people’s emotions and, when I am about to get into a race car, I definitely listen to music with a good beat – that’s when you’ve got the adrenalin pumping. And the time before you go into a race weekend, you have a lot of emotion and adrenalin, and a lot of focus.
  309. I just feel we are extremely lucky that when we wake up, we get to go to work and do something we love. Honestly, we can’t call it work. We’re living the dream, really. If you start thinking about the dangers too much, it’s time to stop.
  310. I have been waiting to win a world championship since 1985. I’ve had three cracks at a world title – in karting, I finished third at Le Mans; that hurt because it was very close, but then in Formula One there wasn’t really an opportunity to finally crack it, so it’s third time lucky.
  311. I have been listening to sport and watching sport on the BBC since I was a tiny boy.
  312. I don’t do much driving – about 5,000-6,000 miles a year. And most of that is to the airport and to the racing circuits.
  313. I clipped a Ferrari, hit the gravel trap at a fair old speed, which lifted the car up into the barrier, and then rolled a few times. I had no injuries or anything – I just had to wait for the marshals to right the car before I could get out.
  314. Especially with sports cars, when you have got so many cars on the track with various degrees of competitiveness, then something will happen. It’s the nature of racing, the law of averages. If you want to be a front-runner then you are going to have to push very hard, and collisions can happen.
  315. As a driver you enjoy winning races, and if you win in the easiest way possible, fine, but in reality we all remember the fights to the end, the nip and tuck stuff.
  316. You had 42 blacks that ran on the Republican ticket this Cycle, 14 made of them made it to the general election and two of us made it to the House of Representatives. So I think that there is a new movement that needs to have a voice in the Congressional Black Caucus.
  317. While there are towns and cities still planning Memorial Day parades, many have not held a parade in decades. Some think the day is for honoring anyone who has died, not just those fallen in service to our country.
  318. Where is love exchanged? Where is the love felt when a state administrator stuffs a welfare check into an outgoing mail?
  319. When you look what is happening in this country with the debt, the deficit, the CBO coming out and saying once again we’re going to have a trillion dollar plus deficit in 2012, the fourth straight year, and unemployment may be going back up to 8.9 or maybe nine percent by the end of the year, these are serious situations that are going.
  320. When more Americans prefer freebies to freedom, these great United States will become a fertile ground for tyranny.
  321. When did ‘Ask not what your country can do for you’ become ‘Ask only what your country will give you’?
  322. When dealing with illegal immigration, the answer is simple; enforce Constitutional mandates, and you will protect Floridians and the American people.
  323. When I retired out of the military, I registered myself as a Republican because my views and perspectives were more in line with that party.
  324. Well, first of all, we’ve got to get away from being offended by the truth. We’ve seen a 41 percent increase in food stamp recipients across the United States of America since President Obama was sworn in in January 2009. That has nothing to do with black, white, Hispanic or whatever. It’s a fact, and we need to, you know, deal with that.
  325. Well, I think we need to have attrition by enforcement. We need to secure our borders. We need to enforce our laws.
  326. We’re told compassion comes not from generosity but from compliance. We’re told kindness means raiding a man’s hard-earned wages and sending them off to Washington so they – not you – may dole them out in courtesies and indulgences.
  327. We must not allow the liberals to move us away from the conservative values of the American past which sustain our present and shall secure our future. As for me and my family, we will serve God, we will serve this constitutional republic, we will serve America.
  328. We must never forget why we have, and why we need our military. Our armed forces exist solely to ensure our nation is safe, so that each and every one of us can sleep soundly at night, knowing we have ‘guardians at the gate.’
  329. We believe in humility and integrity, the spirit of one people, bound together under God. We understand that the Constitution was written to control and regulate the government, not the people.
  330. This liberal progressive agenda… is the antithesis of who we are as a constitutional republic.
  331. This is what America is about when it comes to understanding that it is equal opportunity versus equal achievement. Each and every one of us has the opportunity for greatness in this country.
  332. There’s nothing on this green earth that a liberal progressive fears more than a black American who wants a better life and a smaller government.
  333. The republic I fell in love with, the republic I risked my life to defend, the values I hold dear, the integrity that we all share – these do not know prejudice and they do not accept partiality.
  334. The little platoon of the black community is the church. Our Christian faith is based on individual freedom from sin and the personal decision to find spiritual liberty that leads to a better life here on Earth and for eternity. On Sundays in America, the most conservative people can be found in black churches.
  335. The great thing that I appreciate – the fact that my godfather, William ‘Sticky’ Jackson, was a Tuskegee Airman because my father was first born in Ozark, Alabama. The sacrifices and the commitment of those men made it possible for myself and many others.
  336. The Republicans in the House and Senate took the district that I firmly represent, 22 in south Florida, from a D plus one to a D plus five almost a D plus six district, which means you are given a five to six percent registration advantage to Democrats. They drew in more Democrats into the district I represent.
  337. Take your message of equality of achievement, take your message of economic dependency, take your message of enslaving the entrepreneurial will and spirit of the American people somewhere else.
  338. So now is an opportunity for us to stand up and have a good, strong immigration policy to make sure that E- Verify becomes mandatory and we have got to train and properly equip our Border Patrol.
  339. Quite simply, federal laws already on the books aimed at stopping the flow of illegal immigration must be enforced. Furthermore, states must be given the resources necessary to confront the problem, which includes strengthening the border patrol.
  340. Part of Obamacare eliminated the private sector financial market that engages in giving college student loans. I mean, now the federal government has taken over college student loans, so I sit back and strategically look at this and say this just cannot be happening.
  341. Our soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen volunteer to protect and defend this country and all its citizens, and do so with honor, integrity and excellence. Our nation continually asks them to do more and more, with less and less.
  342. Our purpose is to be up here to resolve these issues. Our purpose is to be up here and represent the people.
  343. One of the critical issues that we have to confront is illegal immigration, because this is a multi-headed Hydra that affects our economy, our health care, our health care, our education systems, our national security, and also our local criminality.
  344. Of course, for me, having served 22 years in the military and to have the opportunity to continue to serve my country is a great honor and is a privilege. So that’s what makes it special each and every day.
  345. Of course we have compassion. We just don’t believe the safety net should be used as a hammock.
  346. Nowadays, many Americans have forgotten the meaning and traditions of Memorial Day. At cemeteries across the country, the graves of the fallen are sadly ignored, and worse, neglected.
  347. No one talked about the fact that in this year under the Obama administration you’ve seen the highest casualties in Afghanistan. And the fact that it took him almost 90 days to figure out what his strategy is going to be was absolutely appalling.
  348. Liberals worry that what’s best for the individual might not be better for the public at large. But that philosophy assumes something vicious about each and every one of us. It assumes we only care about ourselves.
  349. Liberal progressivism evolved after our Constitution. It has repeatedly failed all over the world so why do we think it could be successful here in the United States of America?
  350. Leadership is about being a servant first.
  351. It is the liberal philosophy, not the conservative one, that views humans as selfish automatons.
  352. In the real world, I see conservatives volunteering at adoption agencies, at churches, at bake sales and the local American Legion Post while the only charity a progressive sends is a smug sermon on fair share and what fairness is.
  353. In Obama’s case, we’ve enabled affirmative action to find a home in the nation’s highest office. There you have it. I said it and I stand by it. America fell for the gimmick candidate, disregarding every fact and warning sign in the rush to have ‘the first African-American president.’
  354. If people want to keep their kid on their insurance at 26, fine. We’ve got to make sure no American gets turned back for pre-existing conditions, that’s fine.
  355. I’ve been married for 22 years. That’s the only person I want.
  356. I’m tired of liberals dividing this country up into little groups, setting them upon each other, breeding spite and envy, and then having the nerve to accuse conservatives of hatred.
  357. I’m a conservative because I believe we’re here on this earth to do a little more than crawl through life, comfortable in the cradle of government excess and oblivious to the duties required to keep this republic standing.
  358. I’m a conservative because I believe in peace – real peace, not just the peace of mind. I’m a conservative because we understand that real peace comes from the Marine Corps, not the Peace Corps.
  359. I’ll give you a great example of an issue that no one brought up during this Florida primary, the fact that we’re going to have a Chinese made oil rig put in place about 60 miles off the coast of Florida.
  360. I think we have to understand that when tolerance becomes a one-way street, it will lead to cultural suicide. We should not allow the Muslim Brotherhood or associated groups to be influencing our national security strategy.
  361. I think that this liberal progressive agenda is not the thing that the American people want and it’s antithesis to who we are as a constitutional republic.
  362. I think that there is a changing wind. There are black conservatives out there, and their voices need to be heard.
  363. I think that if we get back to some basic fundamental principles, we can make sure that we resolve the issues. And I think that that’s what the Tea Party was all about. It’s getting back to a constitutional conservative government. And that is limited, but it’s also effective and efficient. I think that that’s what we’ll be able to do.
  364. I think that Governor Romney operates on the capital gains tax, his investments, what he lives off of instead of doing it off of his income.
  365. I think that Governor Romney needs to talk about the fact that what he tried to do in the state of Massachusetts was him seeing what could be best for his state, but maybe it didn’t work out as well.
  366. I taught high school for one year in Deerfield Beach, Fla., and in the end, it was such an enjoyable experience breaking up fights daily, that I decided to return to the combat zone of Afghanistan.
  367. I support transitioning from the progressive tax to a flat tax system – both individual and corporate/business.
  368. I spent 22 years in the United States military, so I’m a pretty strategic level thinker.
  369. I never heard the word ‘compromise’ used. So I’m starting to believe that these terms only come into play to try and force Republicans to do what the Democrats want.
  370. I don’t think there’s anything divisive about me.
  371. I don’t look to a man to get pride in myself. It’s not about having a black president, it’s about having a good president, and I think that’s the most important thing.
  372. I do not believe having a baby is punishment.
  373. I believe there’s about 78 to 81 members of the Democrat Party who are members of the Communist Party. It’s called the Congressional Progressive Caucus.
  374. I believe the election and reelection of Obama were among the most conspicuous acts of denial in recent years. Voters just stopped paying attention. They accepted consistently bad behavior and rewarded it. Then they wonder why they get more bad behavior.
  375. I am willing to work with anyone that wants to do what is best for this country.
  376. I am sick and tired of hearing that it is our moral duty to serve the state, because conservatives believe that it is our moral duty to serve our fellow man regardless of race, sex, affiliation or creed, and when we serve, we believe that it is the state’s duty to get out of the way.
  377. I am angry about the mammoth, out-of-control social welfare entitlement programs from Washington, D.C., that were supposed to solve our problems. The obvious truth is these impractical, politically motivated programs have irreparably damaged the fabric of our black society and community.
  378. From 1971 onwards, the Memorial Day holiday was officially observed on the last Monday in May and became the unofficial start of the summer, with barbecues, blockbuster movie openings and mattress sales.
  379. For far too long we’ve allowed the other side to paint us as racist, as sexist, inhumane war mongers – well, today as a conservative black Republican and former solider, I’m here to set that record straight.
  380. Every year, thousands of Californians flee that populous paradise for tax-eased small government oasis of America’s red states.
  381. Conservatives understand that the power that binds our republic together is fierce independence held high on the shoulders of compassion.
  382. Compassion comes from a choice and not the liberal definition of a choice – the choice to say I can do with a little less so my brother can have a little more.
  383. But when I look at the fact that today is 1,000 days that we have not had a budget for the United States of America, you know, the House, one of the things we did, we passed a budget last year. But that is still sitting over there at the Senate. And so we have got to get this country back on track.
  384. As a 22-year Army Veteran who served in Operations Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom, and as a Civilian Advisor to the Afghan Army in Operation Enduring Freedom, I understand both the gravity of giving the order, and the challenge of carrying it out.
  385. A person like myself, born and raised in the inner city of Atlanta, Georgia, to lower-middle-class parents. But I had the opportunity to get an education, to go and earn a commission in the United States Army, to serve for 22 years, to lead men and women in combat.
  386. What I try to do is always get the newest, funniest people in anything.
  387. The legwork is always hard. Really finding people that you think are good enough. Just the definition of what we have to do is finding good enough people that you really think are special.
  388. Stand-ups are always good to see on YouTube. There’s a guy named Mike Head who lives in Cleveland. He’s great. He’s an African-American stand-up.
  389. Pretty people don’t keep comedies on the air. Funny people keep comedies on the air.
  390. Kids can really get better quickly. Here’s another thing I would like to say: Kids should never be coached by their parents, ever. They should be as natural as possible.
  391. It’s easier to get an actor when you just ask them to do a day on something rather than have them come in, audition, get picked.
  392. I would say take any work you can get. Don’t pass on something if it’s a commercial. Take it. Work really does lead to other work. Especially if you’re just starting out, work begets work.
  393. I have found that so many directors and producers in the room say nothing, and this can be deadly. It’s very difficult to audition for comedy in the vacuum of a small room, but it’s the only way most do it.
  394. I don’t really troll the Internet; I’m not young enough.
  395. I don’t ever take credit for discovering anybody, except for McLovin on ‘Superbad’.
  396. Being funny is everything to me.
  397. ‘Arrested Development’ is great; Mitch Hurwitz is great. Plus, it’s the one show I’ve ever had where, on the small parts, he just let me cast people.
  398. You don’t want to keep giving yourself a sugar spike and then crash and get exhausted and need coffee because you shoot for a long time. On set, I eat a lot of peanut butter and apples, things that have actual energy and protein in them to keep me going.
  399. Worst advice? I either don’t remember it or I’ve been very lucky in terms of getting good advice.
  400. With ‘Girls,’ Marnie was a slow burn; she shifted over time. With ‘Get Out,’ I was suddenly faced with the pressure that, like, I need an audience to know Rose deeply within 15 minutes, within a couple scenes. And that’s not something I’ve ever done before.
  401. When I was little, I used to watch Disney movies all the time, and it drove me crazy that Cinderella’s tights wouldn’t gather at her ankle when her foot bent, so I kept trying to make sure that I didn’t get those little creases on my ankle because Cinderella didn’t have them.
  402. When I graduated from college in early 2010, I decided that I needed to create a calling card, some kind of business card that people can link to my name and face. So I did this ‘Mad Men Theme Song… With a Twist’ music video. I released it just as I moved to L.A.
  403. We’re just a big media family. My mom is always sending us articles throughout the day. My husband now works at Facebook… so it’s just a very high-paced media culture, our texts. It’s links and photos, and all hours of the day, because my dad, my brother, and I are night owls, and my mom and my husband wake up early.
  404. We live in the Facebook era. I think everyone, not just celebrities, have an unprecedented level of self-awareness, of presenting yourself to the world. The truth is, it starts with how you look, and that goes into how you dress.
  405. Trying to imagine what it’s like to be someone else is never a substitute for actually living that way, for acknowledging the respect that we need to have for each other’s experiences.
  406. To try and to pretend that there’s no difference between where we come from is so dumb.
  407. There’s no trajectory to follow. Even if you were to say, ‘OK, I’m going to model my ascent based on this other person’s,’ luck and timing play such a big part that it’s really futile.
  408. There are lots of things about me that aren’t like the rest of my friends. But I try to learn as much about millennials as I can so I can stay afloat among them.
  409. The idea of doing something that I’ve never done before, that presents a new challenge, that forces me to stretch in some way – that’s kind of a perfect project for me, and especially something that has greater social, conversational ramifications. I mean what more could you want?
  410. The idea of a young girl who knows exactly what she wants with her life is the most threatening and unappealing thing you can imagine.
  411. The blessing of having your first project be something as fantastic as ‘Girls’ is that it gave me room to be selective because I didn’t feel pressure to do other things. The curse is that my standards were really high.
  412. The Emmys is great, but the Golden Globes, you have the stars of television and the stars of movies in one place.
  413. Sometimes fake laughing is hard once you’ve done a scene 18 times. I don’t want to brag, but I have a reputation for being very, very good at that. It’s funny finding what’s challenging about acting as you go.
  414. Showing ‘Get Out’ to a room full of strangers and having them react lets them be introspective and see the way certain images affect other people.
  415. One of my favorite things to do is to play music really loud and dance my butt off in the morning. I’ll do it alone in my apartment. You can’t have a bad day after that.
  416. My whole background is character acting: weird costumes, fat suits, playing men, playing animals – I’ve never played anyone with whom there’s any overlapping Venn diagram.
  417. My mom has beautiful eyes, and I inherited a lot of her rituals, accentuating eyes.
  418. My dad keeps joking about sneaking into my grandparents’ house and switching out their HBO for PBS so they think I’m on ‘Downton Abbey.’
  419. Look at Jennifer Aniston: She’s America’s sweetheart for a reason. You know what she’s going to look like when she shows up to something, and there’s something so comfortable about that.
  420. It’s very weird waking around a corner and being nose to nose with myself on the side of a bus. And Times Square – that’s the craziest one.
  421. It’s safe to say I’m a comedy nerd. I listen to so many podcasts. I just love to laugh.
  422. It’s a normal thing for people to do, going on Facebook and seeing pictures of their exes with their new significant others.
  423. It took years and a lot of diligence on my part. But I’ve formed my own thing, and now I get people who are surprised to find out he’s my dad. I dreamed that would happen, and it has: I’m no longer introduced to people as Brian Williams’ daughter.
  424. In real life, we do things out of character, constantly. A couple of days ago, my shoes were hurting, so I walked barefoot through New York. Someone who has known me my whole life would think that was so out of character. But I did it because of the circumstances.
  425. In order to have skin that glows and looks healthy and actually is healthy, you need to look at the whole picture and have a holistic approach to it. A lot of it is exercising regularly, drinking enough water, getting enough sleep, and keeping stress down.
  426. In most cases, no one asks what I think, and so for me to be ready to volunteer it unprompted, I have to feel very ready to accept whatever is coming next.
  427. I’ve wanted to act since I was little, but my parents told me I couldn’t pursue it until after college. The understanding was that I was lucky enough to be able to go to college and that it’s important to being successful in life.
  428. I’ve put on makeup just for fun since I was a really little girl. Now I keep a look book for inspiration – with hair, makeup, beauty tips and products to try.
  429. I’ve done so many funny jobs. I worked at a farmer’s market through high school. I worked in the stock room of Ralph Lauren. I graduated to salesperson at Ralph Lauren, which was a big deal to me. I’ve been a P.A. I’ve been a stand-in. I’ve been an assistant’s assistant.
  430. I’ve been dumped hard. My heart has been broken and shattered, and I’ve also been on the other end of that too.
  431. I’m very protective; it’s in my wiring.
  432. I’m so happy that I finished college. Going into this crazy vortex of scrutiny is tough. If I was younger than I was now and I was going to fashion shows, I might have this distorted sense of self. I might rely on those cameras. Because when I was 18, I was half-baked.
  433. I’m not a dieter. I have the palate of a 7-year-old boy, although I’m working on it. I order off the kids’ menu! I’m working hard to eat more fruit and veggies and round it all out, but I’m a big pretzels and Diet Coke kind of girl.
  434. I’m drawn to what I’m drawn to. I wear jeans and loafers everyday, mostly casual, but when I really turn it on, I like a classic, simple look.
  435. I’m an obsessive musical theatre person, so some of the most formative albums for me were, you know, the ‘Phantom Of The Opera’ soundtrack or ‘Into The Woods.’
  436. I’m a master assembler of Ikea furniture, in case anyone wants to know.
  437. I’m a major breath person, so I always have gum, mints.
  438. I’m a big Aqua fan. ‘Barbie Girl’ was a big deal growing up.
  439. I would prefer to keep my clothes on. Unless there’s a brisk breeze or something, I tend to keep them on.
  440. I would never tell someone else how to use their platform, because I think I’m much more comfortable allowing the work that I do to speak for itself.
  441. I will never actually be able to know what it’s like to go through life in someone else’s body.
  442. I will have my publicist pull pictures of the way I look at events so I can see, ‘Oh, that cut is not as flattering as I thought,’ or ‘I should smile bigger,’ or ‘That positioning is odd.’ I learn from it.
  443. I was only allowed only to watch public television until I was 12 years old. I would come home from friends’s houses with a list of demands. ‘OK, We have all the wrong cereals. You guys are asleep on the job.’
  444. I was only allowed only to watch public television until I was 12 years old.
  445. I was in character all the time when I was little.
  446. I want to play a villain. I want to play a romantic heroine.
  447. I wake up every morning thinking I need to be edgier.
  448. I try to always have a hair cut that I don’t have to style every day, so I’ll usually just let my hair air dry.
  449. I told my parents I wanted to be an actress years before I wrapped my head around what my dad did for a living. It’s not easy to explain the job of the television journalist, especially when a lot of my friends’ dads had jobs that were a lot easier to explain, like a lawyer, a banker or a doctor.
  450. I think I’ve always had that bird’s-eye view of myself. I think it’s an actor trait… Sometimes it’s best just to get lost out there, but other times you have to be aware of where the light’s hitting you.
  451. I started out really into musical theater. So you can imagine I was super popular. I wasn’t awkward looking at all.
  452. I read very one-note. Teacher’s pet, Goody Two-shoes. I’d hate to be annoying. Who wants to see movies with someone annoying in them? But it’s hard for me to paint myself as anything but whatever it is I come across as – which is pretty together.
  453. I put so much pressure on myself to be perfect. Between homework and sports and drama and being social, I slept about four hours a night through high school and college.
  454. I operate with this sense of needing to live up to what I am asking of people. I am, by far, my own worst critic.
  455. I love seeing blank days in my calendar.
  456. I love dancing. It’s one of my favorite things in the whole world.
  457. I love Emma Watson’s makeup a lot. I love Cate Blanchett. I’m biased, though. I love my makeup artist, Julie Harris; she is really phenomenal, but everyone has their technique, and there are incredible-looking girls out there.
  458. I know what I’m like when I don’t have a project coming up, and that’s the mode I’m almost more comfortable in. That’s when I get really scrappy and creative.
  459. I just have always been so interested in the way actors and actresses present themselves to the world because I think it is very important and it affects the way people see you as an actor.
  460. I invested in a blow-dryer. I do a very simple blow out that I’ve gotten quite good at. I’m ambidextrous. I often wonder why people’s hair looks lopsided. It’s because it’s hard to reach both sides of your hair.
  461. I have a doughnut every morning. The same kind, from a street cart. Vanilla frosted with sprinkles on one half, weirdly. How hard is it to sprinkle the whole thing?
  462. I feel that too much singing annoys people.
  463. I don’t want to be any more interesting than I am. I love the life that I get to live, which is one of real independence and privacy and autonomy.
  464. I don’t understand how some of these young actresses are wearing such provocative, editorial items, when they haven’t even established a career yet. It’s hard to see past that. I’m not so sure that’s smart in the long run.
  465. I do not want to ask people to go consume something unless I think it is important in some way.
  466. I definitely hand myself over to the hair and makeup gods of ‘Girls.’ Our look on the show is very specific, and it’s different from mine in real life, although I’ve definitely learned things from working with both the hair and makeup people for the show.
  467. I cannot wait until the day I can go back to school… I’ve already picked my program: anthropology at Columbia. I will not get in, but a girl can dream.
  468. I can rap. Not openly in the world, but it’s important that people know! I can rap for a very specific reason, which is that in college I was in an improv comedy group, and we did musical improv.
  469. I auditioned for ‘Girls’ the fall after I graduated from Yale. The show has been amazing – as close to perfect as it gets!
  470. I am traditional: a big note writer, and I like using the phone.
  471. I am private because I’m still figuring things out. I’m young! I’m making it up as I go!
  472. I am not someone who thinks that a million products will mean that you’ll look perfect.
  473. I am in the fortunate-enough position where I can be picky.
  474. I always ask, ‘Is this movie essential? Does this movie need to exist? Does it need to exist right now?’ And the answer to that is almost always no.
  475. For cardio, I do SoulCycle. I really don’t like to run, plus I have terrible knees and get bored on the elliptical. SoulCycle is basically a dance party on a bicycle, and you burn calories, and it’s so fun.
  476. Everyone wants to feel like they were the one and only person that the other person could ever fall in love with.
  477. Even when I was a child, my best friend was a 92-year-old woman.
  478. Catherine Keener is everyone’s dream sister slash mom slash aunt.
  479. As an actor, I love the feeling of being on set and the camaraderie of working on something together.
  480. Actors are like Swiss Army knives – we’re ready to use any lever at any moment. But I learned long ago that, unfortunately, this industry only sees the one thing sticking out that they know us from, and that’s the only thing they can imagine.
  481. A lot of guys I know loved ‘Sex and the City.’ They’ll take it to their grave, but they watched every episode of it.
  482. A good number of my friends are married, which seems very old-fashioned.
  483. ‘Girls’ was my first audition. I’d just taken an audition class, and I was excited to implement those tools.
  484. You know, I love wearing heels. I wish I could wear them all the time, but, you know, my sport doesn’t really permit it.
  485. Try to think of working out and healthy eating as a lifestyle. Rather than go on a diet or try a crazy exercise routine, try making them something you do every day.
  486. The most important lesson that I have learned is to trust God in every circumstance. Lots of times we go through different trials and following God’s plan seems like it doesn’t make any sense at all. God is always in control and he will never leave us.
  487. The biggest way I stay motivated is to run with a group of friends. Sometimes it’s hard to get going by yourself, but if you have a plan and a meeting time, you know this run will happen for sure. It’s a way to have fun – while also getting in a workout. Plus it distracts from pain, helps you fight fatigue, and gives you that extra push.
  488. The 200 meters is my baby. To me, it’s the perfect distance. It’s still a true sprint, but it unravels more. You get to enjoy the race a little bit more than the 100.
  489. Right now I’d say my favorite fashion designer is Zac Posen.
  490. Philippians 1:21 is very special to me because it helps to keep my life centered.
  491. My speed is a gift from God, and I run for His glory. Whatever I do, it all comes from him.
  492. My mom is great and I make sure that we pray together before every race. She helps me put everything in perspective and remind me of the real reason I run.
  493. My faith inspires me so much. It is the very reason that I run. I feel that my running is completely a gift from God and it is my responsibility to use it to glorify him.
  494. My dad’s a pastor and a seminary professor; my mom, she has such great faith.
  495. Most people don’t think about plyometrics when they think about powerful strength. But I do lots of them to build mine.
  496. It was not until the end of my freshman year in high school that I thought I could really have a future in track and field. I definitely did not think I could make it to the Olympics back then, though; I was just focused on making it to the state finals!
  497. I’ve got to make sure I’m keeping weight on.
  498. I’m really laid back but I still like to dress up sometimes.
  499. I’m just competitive. It doesn’t matter what it is. I want to win.
  500. I was a disruptive child.
  501. I think that kids aren’t even exploring the option of sports anymore, and they don’t even know what they could do.
  502. I spend around two and half hours on the track every day running and another 2 hours in the weight room lifting weights with my strength coach.
  503. I spend around three hours on the track and two hours in the weight room, five or six days a week.
  504. I never let track define me. That’s something that’s really important to me.
  505. I myself am frustrated in just where sports are at. It’s a hard thing when you’re out there working every day, and you know that someone else is cheating and they may not necessarily get caught.
  506. I majored in elementary education, and I have a passion for kids.
  507. I love the relays. Track is such an individual sport, so it’s fun to do something together.
  508. I love a great pair of jeans and a nice blouse.
  509. I have learned that track doesn’t define me. My faith defines me. I’m running because I have been blessed with a gift.
  510. I grew up in a Christian home with amazing parents.
  511. I feel old.
  512. I don’t have a sprinter’s body.
  513. I am a sprinter, and I love to go fast. It’s very difficult for me to be patient and follow a race strategy or conserve energy.
  514. I am a big believer in visualization. I run through my races mentally so that I feel even more prepared.
  515. I always want to give more than I gave yesterday.
  516. I always look back to my first Olympic medal in 2004 in Athens. I was very new to the sport, and it was my first big win at the Olympics.
  517. Being a role model is a privilege.
  518. Before a race, I block out what’s going on in the stadium. It’s different for everyone. But for me, I’ve always been able to block it out. For a sprint race, it’s important not to get distracted.
  519. To love for the sake of being loved is human, but to love for the sake of loving is angelic.
  520. There is a woman at the begining of all great things.
  521. The people only understand what they can feel; the only orators that can affect them are those who move them.
  522. The more I see of the representatives of the people, the more I admire my dogs.
  523. Sometimes, only one person is missing, and the whole world seems depopulated.
  524. Providence conceals itself in the details of human affairs, but becomes unveiled in the generalities of history.
  525. Private passions tire and exhaust themselves, public ones never.
  526. Poets and heroes are of the same race, the latter do what the former conceive.
  527. Limited in his nature, infinite in his desire, man is a fallen god who remembers heaven.
  528. If one had but a single glance to give the world, one should gaze on Istanbul.
  529. Habit with it’s iron sinews, clasps us and leads us day by day.
  530. Grief knits two hearts in closer bonds than happiness ever can; and common sufferings are far stronger links than common joys.
  531. Experience is the only prophecy of wise men.
  532. Brutality to an animal is cruelty to mankind – it is only the difference in the victim.
  533. A conscience without God is like a court without a judge.
  534. Your God is ever beside you – indeed, He is even within you.
  535. Yet you should practice the greatest possible love and confidence in treating with Him.
  536. With such thoughts in your mind, now that you have resolved to love Him and please Him with all your strength, your only fear should be to fear God too much and to place too little confidence in Him.
  537. Who is there that ever receives a gift and tries to make bargains about it? Let us, then, return thanks for what He has bestowed on us. Who can tell whether, if we had had a larger share of ability or stronger health, we should not have possessed them to our destruction.
  538. What grieves me most in my past offenses, O my loving God, is not so much the punishment I have deserved, as the displeasure I have given You, Who are worthy of infinite love.
  539. True, He is infinite Majesty, but He is also infinite Goodness and infinite Love. There can be no greater Lord than God; neither can there be a more ardent lover than He.
  540. The heart of man is, so to speak, the paradise of God.
  541. Speak to Him often of your business, your plans, your troubles, your fears – of everything that concerns you.
  542. Since His delights are to be with you, let yours be found in Him.
  543. Nothing else is required than to act toward God, in the midst of your occupations, as you do, even when busy, toward those who love you and whom you love.
  544. Not only is there no need of an intermediary through whom He would want you to speak to Him, but He finds His delight in having you treat with Him personally and in all confidence.
  545. Just as a mother finds pleasure in taking her little child on her lap, there to feed and caress him, in like manner our loving God shows His fondness for His beloved souls who have given themselves entirely to Him and have placed all their hope in His goodness.
  546. Job was astonished at seeing Almighty God so intent on doing good to us that He seems to have nothing more at heart than to love us and to induce us to love Him in return.
  547. It is a great mistake, as we have already remarked, to be afraid of Him and to act in His presence like a timid and craven slave trembling with fright before his master.
  548. If you wish to strengthen your confidence in God still more, often recall the loving way in which He has acted toward you, and how mercifully He has tried to bring you out of your sinful life, to break your attachment to the things of earth and draw you to His love.
  549. God is displeased at the diffidence of souls who love Him sincerely and whom He Himself loves.
  550. But You never reject a repentant and humble heart.
  551. Assuredly, Loving Souls, you should go to God with all humility and respect, humbling yourselves in His presence, especially when you remember your past ingratitude and sins.
  552. Ask those who love Him with a sincere love, and they will tell you that they find no greater or prompter relief amid the troubles of their life than in loving conversation with their Divine Friend.
  553. Acquire the habit of speaking to God as if you were alone with Him, familiarly and with confidence and love, as to the dearest and most loving of friends.
  554. We still spend more time chasing funds than we do in the studio in creative work.
  555. The creative process is not controlled by a switch you can simply turn on or off; it’s with you all the time.
  556. Sometimes you feel bad about yourself when there’s no reason to.
  557. Racism tears down your insides so that no matter what you achieve, you’re not quite up to snuff.
  558. One of the worst things about racism is what it does to young people.
  559. One of the processes of your life is to constantly break down that inferiority, to constantly reaffirm that I Am Somebody.
  560. Nothing personal; I just don’t have people over.
  561. No matter what you write or choreograph, you feel it’s not enough.
  562. My lasting impression of Truman Capote is that he was a terribly gentle, terribly sensitive, and terribly sad man.
  563. My feelings about myself have been terrible.
  564. Money is a never-ending problem.
  565. Lena Horne is the sweetest and most adorable woman in the world.
  566. It will take very sophisticated marketing to achieve our aim of bringing more black people into the theater.
  567. In this business, life is one long fund-raising effort.
  568. If you live in the elite world of dance, you find yourself in a world rife with racism. Let’s face it.
  569. I’m attracted to long-legged girls with long arms and a little head.
  570. I am trying to show the world that we are all human beings and that color is not important. What is important is the quality of our work.
  571. I always want to have more dancers in my company.
  572. I always want more.
  573. Dance is for everybody. I believe that the dance came from the people and that it should always be delivered back to the people.
  574. Choreography is mentally draining, but there’s a pleasure in getting into the studio with the dancers and the music.
  575. You have a responsibility to move your dreams forward, no matter what.
  576. Women in Somalia face almost unimaginable oppression.
  577. With awareness come responsibility and choice.
  578. When you see a 14-year-old boy who has never known what peace looks like for a day in his life, there’s part of you as a human being that feels some degree, you can say, compassion for the fact that these boys have known war, famine, violence and death from the day they were born.
  579. What happened to me in Somalia doesn’t define me.
  580. What a woman is taught, she shares with her family.
  581. War dehumanizes everyone.
  582. The same men who are placing all these outrageous restrictions on women’s freedoms in southern Somalia – that type of mentality – that’s what I had to deal with in captivity.
  583. The road to recovery will not always be easy, but I will take it one day at a time, focusing on the moments I’ve dreamed about for so long.
  584. The greatest gift you have been given is the gift of your imagination – what do you dream of wanting to do?
  585. The countries with the greatest problems have the kindest people.
  586. The book is called ‘A House in the Sky’ because during the very, very darkest times, that was how I survived. I had to find a safe place to go in my mind where there was no violence being done to my body and where I could reflect on the life I had lived and the life that I still wanted to live.
  587. The big-time journalists generally had kidnapping insurance through their news organizations. Usually, it would pay for a crisis response company to help negotiate for a hostage’s release. Freelancers most often had none.
  588. Sometimes, you have to make the choice to forgive 10 times a day when you have these pockets of anger come up. That’s a lot of work, but to me it’s worthwhile.
  589. Sometimes it’s nice for people not to know anything about me.
  590. Somalia is very dangerous, and no one knows that better than I.
  591. Somalia is an important story in the world, and it needed to be told.
  592. My faith in human decency was sorely tested at times during my captivity; however, after my release, I am humbly reminded that mankind is inherently good by the tremendous efforts and support of fellow Canadians.
  593. My confidence came from the way I grew up, and I’m grateful for it.
  594. My captors were definitely aware that what they were doing was wrong. It came out in small ways – occasionally through a show of guilt or compassion. One of the boys bought me a gift. Another used to sneak me acetaminophen tablets.
  595. Many, including the Canadian and U.S. governments, try to provide family support while also maintaining a hard line about further fuelling terrorism and hostage-taking through ransom payments … Still, try telling that to a mother, or a father, or a husband or wife caught in the powerless agony of standing by.
  596. Maintaining my dignity is so important for me.
  597. It’s difficult to put into words what freedom feels like. You only know what freedom feels like if you know what it feels like to not be free.
  598. It was a slow understanding that the lack of education in a country like Somalia creates these huge social problems.
  599. It was a slow understanding that my kidnappers really are a product of their environment.
  600. I’m not afraid of IED’s, bullets, mortars.
  601. I’m afraid of the dark, but I choose to sleep in the dark. I can fall right to sleep with the lights on. But I want to be someone who can sleep in the dark, so that’s the choice that I make.
  602. I’m afraid of elevators, because they are an enclosed space, but I get in.
  603. I would like to especially acknowledge my home community of Calgary, and the people of central Alberta who made my dream of freedom a reality.
  604. I went through an extremely trying ordeal, but I never forgot the world outside was a beautiful place.
  605. I used my captors’ names every chance I had. It was intentional, a way of reminding them that I saw them, of pegging them, of making them see me in return.
  606. I think that I find a lot of my healing out in the world.
  607. I think it’s the human spirit inside of all of us that has an enormous capacity to survive.
  608. I never felt an obligation to say every single terrible thing that happened to me.
  609. I must try desperately to absorb all information I can about the Middle East. I want to excel. I want to speak articulately about the politics of the Middle East and its religion.
  610. I must thank my good friend Nigel Brennan. His strength of character in the midst of extreme hardship inspired me during the darkest days. Despite our separation, he always managed to find small ways to remind me that there are gentlemen in the world, even when I was surrounded by just the opposite.
  611. I made a vow to myself while I was a hostage that if I were lucky enough to live and to get out of Somalia, I would do something meaningful with my life – and specifically something that would be meaningful in the country where I’d lost my freedom.
  612. I know firsthand how critical support systems are.
  613. I have watched lives change. I have seen women gain confidence.
  614. I have a general sense of excitement about the future, and I don’t know what that looks like yet. But it will be whatever I make it.
  615. I don’t think I’m unusual in that, in my 20s, like many people, I felt invincible.
  616. I don’t only long for the thrill of being in the middle of a war, I must understand it; I must make other people understand.
  617. I am so proud to be a Canadian.
  618. Hillary Clinton has a strong and powerful voice regarding ending violence against women and girls.
  619. Hamdi Ulukaya and Chobani have made the decision to feed 250,000 victims of the Somali famine. Their compassion speaks for itself, and is a shining example of how the business community can have an enormous positive impact on the world.
  620. Going into Somalia, I didn’t anticipate how many people’s lives would be affected by it. In hindsight, I certainly wish I had taken more time to think about that, but I can’t change it.
  621. Getting on a plane is hard for me, but I do it, because travel is vital to me.
  622. Friendships that don’t fit my life anymore have faded away, and new ones have come in.
  623. Forgiving is not an easy thing to do.
  624. For a while, the world for me was like a set of monkey bars. I swung from one place to the next, sometimes backward, sometimes forward, capitalizing on my own momentum, knowing that at some point my arms… would give out, and I’d fall to the ground.
  625. Every day I have many choices to make about who I want to be.
  626. Contemplating Christmas when you are isolated and far from home brings its own unique pain.
  627. Christmas was the one time of year when my brothers surfaced at home, when my parents and grandparents congregated to eat my mother’s roast turkey.
  628. Being in the dark, there’s a real weight to it. It’s heavy.
  629. Because travel has always been such a vital part of myself and so essential to who I am, I have made the decision to continue to put myself back out into the world. And that’s not an easy decision to make.
  630. After spending 460 days as a hostage, I did emerge a fundamentally changed person. But I think, like everyone does as they grow older and probably wiser, I can look back at my earlier life – my history, my mistakes, the joy I felt as a young woman traveling the world – with some objectivity and even some humor.
  631. After being in captivity for so long, I can’t begin to describe how wonderful it feels to be home in Canada.
  632. Accompanied by an Australian photographer named Nigel Brennan, I’d gone to Somalia to work as a freelance journalist, on a trip that was meant to last only ten days.
  633. A little goes a long way in Somalia: $5 will feed a person there for about two weeks.
  634. You get the feeling that on a lot of days the audience for most music would kind of rather not be faced with the artist, especially because we’ve been educated to think that the artist are these special creatures are otherwordly and aren’t like us.
  635. Twitter fascinates me because it’s real. It feels kind of unreal, but it makes very real things happen.
  636. There’s something advantageous about being a woman in rock versus, say, a woman in chemistry or construction. There’s definitely a built-in sexism across the board, but I think you’re afforded a degree of freedom in rock because, historically, the rules have been flexible.
  637. There’s no blueprint; getting married doesn’t make you boring, having kids doesn’t make you boring, having money doesn’t necessarily have to make you boring.
  638. There’s a huge cloud of shame around art and business being seen as bedfellows.
  639. The world needs actual excitement and emotion more than it needs cool people.
  640. The stage show is, in some sense, highly theatrical. It’s definitely not just a band in jeans playing rock and roll.
  641. The challenge in my life really is keeping the balance between feeling creatively energized and fulfilled without feeling overwhelmed and like I’m in the middle of a battlefield.
  642. Thank God my best friend’s a therapist.
  643. People had this idea about becoming rock stars packing stadiums instead of having the goal of becoming what musicians used to be in terms of how they would perform and connect people.
  644. One of the best things about Kickstarter and crowdfunding and the collapse of the music business is a lot of artists like me have been forced to face our own weird mess about ourselves and what we thought it meant to become musicians.
  645. Neil Gaiman swooped into my life though another friend, Jason Webley, who knew we were fans of each other’s work and introduced us via email. Neil and I, like me and Ben, just hit it off instantly.
  646. My number-one goal is to never feel like I’m strictly defining myself. The minute I feel like I’m doing that as anything – as theatrical, as feminist, as songwriter – I feel like the minute I name it, I’m stuck in a box.
  647. Meditation, especially for people who don’t know very much about it and think it’s this very hippy dippy thing, can really be powerful, terrifying even, as it lifts the rug up on your subconscious and the dust comes flying out.
  648. In some way, my fundamental feeling about music is that it’s impossible to put a price tag on it. Human beings made music before they made a lot of other things, including tools.
  649. If you’re willing to take risks, Twitter is a vast amusement park of interesting life possibilities.
  650. If you want the world to pay for projects, you have to be able to display why you’re worthy.
  651. If you stuck me in a room and gave me art-making tools but told me no one would ever see the results, I don’t think I’d have much desire to make art. What I do comes from a deep desire to be seen and to see others.
  652. I’ve been in a recording studio enough times to know that it is not the best place to multitask. Doing a couple of takes of a song and running out to check your email to talk to someone about video production really is not good.
  653. I’ve always been a creative workaholic. I have never had a period of my life where I didn’t have at least half a dozen projects going on at once.
  654. I’m a massive fan of David Lynch and ‘Twin Peaks.’
  655. I’d actually say that every musician is a human being, and that not everybody likes being social. But with music, there are all these ingredients to the business that have nothing to do with writing songs or playing an instrument.
  656. I was just a very dark kid. My family was complicated.
  657. I think to say that meditation is helpful to artists is true and it’s great, but it’s also essentially helpful to any kind of process of, just, life.
  658. I think performance art comes from a simple place of wanting to express things beyond just sound.
  659. I think one of the greatest gifts you can give to someone is just access to the possibility of freedom that you don’t have to be totally depressed and enslaved by your own environment.
  660. I think I’ve been addicted to openness since long before my rock career. I was terrible as a teenager. I used to go out of my way to make people uncomfortable with personal details. I was always fascinated by the idea that we have these weird, random boundaries between what we do and don’t show.
  661. I suppose I’m happy to sell my time and energy, but I’m not happy to sell my initial creative time.
  662. I see everybody arguing about what the value of music should be instead of what I think the bigger conversation is, which is that music has value, it’s subjective and we’re moving to a new era where the audience is taking more responsibility for supporting artists at whatever level.
  663. I have used Twitter for so many things, from places to stay, places to go, things to do, things I need, medical advice, you name it. Especially when I’m on tour, it really feels like I’m being taken care of by half a million people. It is like having a mom.
  664. I have never in my career embarked on a journey towards controversy. I have never deliberately set a flame.
  665. I hate being ignored.
  666. I had very literal parents and I wanted to survive with metaphor and art, and there was a real sense of shame around it.
  667. I get so many ideas for songs, but I’m so seldom disciplined enough to sit down and crank them out.
  668. I draw the line at letting people into my songwriting cave. To me, that’s where the alchemy happens and where the mystery is.
  669. I don’t feel at home in New Orleans. I don’t feel at home in Austin or L.A. And I just felt immediately at home in northern Australia.
  670. Every album is just a greatest hits of whatever songs are on a pile when I go in to make a record.
  671. Crowdfunding as an idea itself isn’t new – bands have been doing it since the dawn of time.
  672. Bands like Nirvana had theatrical sensibilities, playing with image, challenging assumptions people were making about them, the apex being Kurt Cobain in a dress to make a point.
  673. You’ve just got to be comfortable with yourself.
  674. You learn very quickly what people are so enamored with, and it’s not necessarily me.
  675. You don’t have to listen to those mean girls. They’re just there to make you upset and make you feel bad about yourself. And you know, inside, they feel bad about themselves too. But they don’t wanna admit it to anybody.
  676. When you’re young, it’s hard not to get together with your costar.
  677. When you’re playing somebody who’s going through a lot – frustration and hardship – you’re just purging all your emotions, and it feels really good to do that.
  678. When you start using test audiences, it becomes more scientific than it is about the work itself, and that’s boring.
  679. When taxidermy is done well it’s an amazing piece of art.
  680. When I was a preteen, I got into singing, and became really obsessed with it. But then, of course, that didn’t work out.
  681. Well, it’s very easy for me to gain weight, but even though I tried not eating for a week when I was really young, I couldn’t do it any longer because I liked my food too much.
  682. Well, if you’re suspecting your lover is having an affair, it’s definitely devastating. It’s really a terrible, terrible feeling because you have no control.
  683. We all get stuck. We all lose ourselves a little bit in a fantasy or in our jobs and forget how we feel about other things. It’s really important to check yourself, to spend some time alone.
  684. Waxing my legs is pretty much the only thing I have to maintain.
  685. There are definitely reasons to do certain things, but I like to stick to good director, good actor, good script.
  686. The funny thing is, the girls that I’m always up against for roles are pretty nice and cool, like Emma Watson. She’s awesome.
  687. Singing was my first love and I never even considered it after I started acting, but now I’m bringing it back into my life. I trained from the ages of 11 to 17. When I moved to New York and got into serious acting, I just kind of abandoned the whole singing thing. But when I grew up in Pennsylvania I went to voice lessons once a week.
  688. Singing is a way of releasing an emotion that you sometimes can’t portray when you’re acting. And music moves your soul, so music is the source of the most intense emotions you can feel. When you hear a song and you’re acting it’s incredible. But when you’re singing a song and you’re acting it’s even more incredible.
  689. Singing is a way of releasing an emotion that you sometimes can’t portray when you’re acting. And music moves your soul, so music is the source of the most intense emotions you can feel.
  690. Perfect is boring.
  691. People are made up of flaws.
  692. Oh yeah, I think about kids all the time. I feel like the next person I commit to, that’s going to be the guy who I’m going to have kids with. That’s in my crazy female brain. So that’s why I’m like, ‘I can’t commit.’
  693. No matter what’s happening in my life, I can always get lost in the romances of my characters.
  694. My sister keeps me grounded.
  695. My focus is to not focus too much on one genre.
  696. My dad, he is such a soft man. Even if he has these opinions about my boyfriends, he will be the sweetest guy. He will make you feel like you’re fascinating and awesome, even if he doesn’t like you that much.
  697. Maybe I should drive a hybrid. I do have a shirt that says, ‘Go Green.’
  698. Marriage, at this point in my life? I’m not interested in it. Yet. Maybe later when I’m 35 or 40.
  699. Making people laugh is magic. I feel like if you have humility, then you can do anything in comedy.
  700. It’s sad, actually, because my anxiety keeps me from enjoying things as much as I should at this age.
  701. It’s really easy to avoid the tabloids. You just live your life and don’t hang out with famous people who are in the tabloids. Don’t do anything controversial and be a normal person. Have friends. And get a job and keep working.
  702. It’s just like my dream to shoot things with no consequences.
  703. It was a big deal to me to play characters and feel things and connect to somebody in a fake world.
  704. It changes you a little bit every time you either break someone’s heart or get your heart broken.
  705. Intimacy is a wonderful thing. It’s frustrating that growing up I thought it was wrong. It isn’t. Exploring your sexuality is important when you’re growing up.
  706. If you can’t pronounce a word correctly, just don’t use it.
  707. I’ve auditioned for roles that involved voice, but I don’t like it. I feel like, I can’t do this in front of you. It seems so separate – I don’t share it with a lot of people. And I’m not into public performances.
  708. I’m trouble, but in a good way.
  709. I’m pretty sure I would never do a full frontal in a movie – for personal reasons, I wouldn’t really want to show that.
  710. I’m not really into clubbing, I like to go to parties after events, and those do end up at clubs or bars. But in my free time I go grocery shopping or to the gym, or I talk on the phone.
  711. I’m not a beautiful prom-girl type.
  712. I’m most comfortable in my birthday suit.
  713. I’m good with getting older because I feel like, one day, I know I will love myself.
  714. I would love to live in Paris and speak French. That would make me feel glamorous!
  715. I would like to establish myself. I don’t want to just have a moment.
  716. I went to four different proms in high school. I was addicted to the whole ballroom thing.
  717. I went to art school when I was little. I took ballet lessons. I played a little kick ball. I was sort of into everything because I had too much energy and I didn’t know where to put it. When I was a preteen, I got into singing, and became really obsessed with it.
  718. I went to art school when I was little.
  719. I was naturally skinny and had braces, so I wasn’t a cute model.
  720. I think the era of the diva actress is coming to an end.
  721. I think I’m past the age of getting lost.
  722. I talk like I know what I’m saying, but I don’t.
  723. I suffer from anxiety attacks a lot.
  724. I sacrificed six years in L.A. I did my job out here. I made contacts and did the work I had to do.
  725. I remember I had a fight with my friend when I touched a boy for the first time and I didn’t tell her. She got mad with me, not because I didn’t tell her but because I’d done it in the first place.
  726. I never saw myself going to college. Even when I was looking at different schools, I was like, this really isn’t right.
  727. I mean, why am I considered an ‘it girl?’ Because I’m in a lot of movies right now or am on the covers of magazines? I just hope there is something solid behind that. Because here’s the thing with ‘it girl’ status. It’s great and amazing that anybody is saying that at all. But how long does that last?
  728. I make hats. I’m on a hat frenzy. I’m on my eighth and I love it.
  729. I love my apartment in New York.
  730. I love animals and they’re very easy to look after when they’re dead.
  731. I love acting like I’m in love. It’s a very positive thing.
  732. I like to keep people guessing.
  733. I just like to do covers, every once in a while. If someone pays me to go into the studio, I’ll do it.
  734. I just don’t like my face.
  735. I just can’t wait for the future.
  736. I have written some songs, but I would really call what I’ve done poetry at the end of the day, because I’ll sit with my guitar for hours and hours on end for, like, a week and then I won’t touch it for a month. I also just have no confidence. And you know what? I don’t have time, because I’d rather be doing other things, like knitting.
  737. I have to feel good on the inside to look glamorous.
  738. I have realized that I hate going to the premieres of the movies that I’m in. Because I feel this tension after the movie is over that everyone feels obligated to say something nice to you. It’s so unnatural and uncomfortable.
  739. I have only really gotten by with playing versions of myself as most young actors do.
  740. I have jeans with holes in them and I have nice jeans. I have casual and I have dressy jeans. I’ve got all kinds.
  741. I have belly fat like everybody else, and I don’t want to be airbrushed on the cover of a magazine.
  742. I have a dirty mouth sometimes, and I’m very liberal, and that doesn’t always go down well in the film industry – especially when you’ve got to appeal to mums and daughters.
  743. I happen to be really a romantic.
  744. I guess I would ideally want to be 20 physically, but 40 mentally.
  745. I get unreasonably nervous before talk shows.
  746. I found a lot of fairy tales scary. They really didn’t sit well with me.
  747. I don’t want to become a brand and I certainly don’t want to have a persona.
  748. I don’t want to be in magazines everyday, because I don’t want people to get used to one thing.
  749. I don’t think it’s really possible to share someone in most cases.
  750. I don’t like to play characters that are too perfect.
  751. I don’t dye my hair and I can go without makeup.
  752. I didn’t like fairy tales when I was younger. I found a lot of fairy tales scary. They really didn’t sit well with me.
  753. I did theatre when I was nine, I think. Nine and ten, and that was just the beginning of my whole involvement in acting, my whole interest. I don’t really remember it that well. But it was really fun. I mean, it was exciting just to be on stage in front of an audience. It gives you a different kind of rush.
  754. I always wanted to make people feel something.
  755. Hollywood is just like high school: The popular people love the other popular people. And the thing is, some people aren’t nice. Or they are nice, but only to your face, not elsewhere.
  756. Hollywood is just like high school. The popular people only like the other popular people. And the thing is, some people aren’t nice – or they’re nice, but only to your face, not elsewhere.
  757. For the first time in my life I’m really happy to be unattached because I realise there is so much responsibility to having a partner.
  758. Being professional is just really clearly the way to go and helps you on the road to longevity.
  759. Anxiety, it just stops your life.
  760. Actors are separated all the time.
  761. A smoky eye and nice hair are not going to make my night any easier.
  762. A film set is really delicate and people treat you very very well if you’re an actor because they want you to be as comfortable as possible for you to do your work, but it really is just one in a team of many and usually 150 people.
  763. You know when people say, ‘How do you go from Kanye to Wiz Khalifa – that’s a downgrade.’ But the only question I can ask them is: ‘Have you ever dated Kanye? Because I have, and believe me, I did not downgrade at all. Not in any aspect, at all.’
  764. When I was super young, I had an Atari and used to play ‘Space Invaders.’ Then I fell in love with ‘Mario Bros.,’ ‘Sonic the Hedgehog’ and ‘Yoshi’ on Super Nintendo. I was quite a bit of a gamer as a kid when I think about it.
  765. When I eat cilantro, it’s like someone sprayed perfume down my throat. It closes up my throat, even if there’s only a little piece. I like Mexican food, and I’ll go out to a Mexican restaurant and tell them, ‘Look, I will die if you get cilantro in my food.’ Then there’s always that one little piece that falls in, and I gag.
  766. Me being a compassionate person, I would never hold any grudges against my ex.
  767. Like every poor person, I used to dream about winning the lottery. I didn’t just get money, though. I got fame. And I got fame before I got money, and it was scary.
  768. I’ve always felt that when you use too many products or try too many new things, you’re just piling a lot of unnatural, unnecessary stress on your face. I try to keep it simple.
  769. I’m pretty blessed when it comes to clear skin. I owe that to being Cape Verdian. My whole family has great skin. My grandfather is 80 but doesn’t look a day over 50. And we all love the sun, too, so blessed is an understatement!
  770. I’m not a DJ, I don’t know how to scratch and I don’t know how to mix, but I do know how to party. One of my jobs is actually to travel the world and party.
  771. I’m not a DJ – I don’t know how to scratch or mix records, but I know how to party, and I know music. I grew up in Philly; it’s a very musical city. My house was full of music.
  772. I’m a Libra. If someone compliments me, I’ll say something nice to them. I like to give out compliments.
  773. I see a lot of young kids hit me on Twitter all the time, like, ‘I want to be famous! Listen to my mixtape! I wish I could be like you!’ But a lot comes with it. It’s not easy.
  774. I love to eat, and I don’t believe in denying myself, so I have to work out. I’m not obsessed with it; I don’t have a trainer or do any of the fancy classes, but I usually put on my iPod and run on the treadmill for an hour a few days a week. I’d much rather be the girl who worked out more so she could eat more; I could never not eat.
  775. I love to eat and I don’t believe in denying myself, so I have to work out. I’m not obsessed with it, I don’t have a trainer or do any of the fancy classes, but I usually put on my iPod and run on the treadmill for an hour a few days a week.
  776. I believe that you can love anyone. I’ve had relationships with women, I’ve had relationships with men. I don’t think you should be judged based on who you find attractive. Especially guys – gay men, they really have it hard sometimes.
  777. I always looked up to Slash from Guns N’ Roses, and I always pictured myself being a rock star and playing the guitar, just going crazy.
  778. When you feel the need to moan and groan, laugh with woeful recognition and eat flaky pastries. If you hear yourself taking the art of complaining a little too seriously, ask yourself what you’re trying to accomplish, exactly.
  779. To me, self-esteem is not self-love. It is self-acknowledgment, as in recognizing and accepting who you are.
  780. There would be times when I got so much work that I didn’t have time to write. School interfered with writing more than writing with school.
  781. Several paranoid suspicions occurred to me, the worst of which was that my whole identity was merely a patched-together set of behaviors designed to keep my parents joined to each other – the repertoire of tricks of a small but intelligent dog.
  782. Self-esteem comes quietly, like the truth.
  783. Reading while I’m writing ideally inspires my competitive side. When I read great writers, I want to be a better writer.
  784. Reading ‘Blood Will Out,’ one begins to understand how so many people were duped by Clark Rockefeller. All the imposter needs is some kind of initial agreement that he is who he says he is; thereafter, consensus builds via a network of human relationships.
  785. Parenthood is a psychic sweat lodge: enter into it only if you are ready to have your own secreted toxins running into your eyes. Few people are prepared for its power – women or men.
  786. Other than a short article I read in 2008 when the real story broke, I have not followed the Clark Rockefeller case, and ‘Schroder’ is not a novelization of that story.
  787. Oh, I’m a pretty bad poet. This has been corroborated by others.
  788. Nobody writes like Nabokov; nobody ever will. What I would give to write one sentence like Vladimir!
  789. My personal writing philosophy is to try and write better every day.
  790. My mother was born in Latvia. She and most of her family fled from the capital city of Riga in 1944 with the final approach of the Soviet army.
  791. Let’s admit it; the only use for complaining is to make people laugh.
  792. It’s dangerous to accept crisis as your baseline. It gets harder and harder to see the anti-crises that are so requisite to happiness: the quiet times, the crucial pauses – like those in a poem.
  793. It goes without saying that before its culture and literature can continue to evolve, Latvia first must endure the political comedy of creating a stable, functioning and unthreatened democracy.
  794. In the name of ‘mutual assistance,’ the Soviet Union would occupy Latvia until 1991, and it continues to occupy Latvia: in the obedient, epic lines at the post office, in the fug of coal smoke outside cities, in the notorious apartment buildings made of bricks of radioactive compressed ash.
  795. In the best writers, the outward-reaching interest in the ‘found subject’ leads back at a hairpin to some uncomfortable inner recognition that the writer has journeyed very far to see; he comes home half-dead.
  796. If you could literally ‘rid’ yourself of your problems by voicing them, I’d be all for it. But since that isn’t so, why not reserve the spoken word for functional interactions and witticisms, if not declarations of love?
  797. I was born on an even keel. Family lore says I never cried, even at birth. I felt at ease on earth, in the right place. And like many children, I took comfort in life’s regularity: Every few days it rained, the school bus came and went, and my parents were rooted in their union.
  798. I wanted – and still want – to tell my mother’s story. She fled Stalin’s army in 1944, leaving Latvia, which was to be occupied by the Soviets for the next 50 years, and arrived to the U.S. when she was 11.
  799. I think novels are profoundly autobiographical. If writers deny that, they are lying. Or if it’s really true, then I think it’s a mistake.
  800. I think marriage and family keeps being written about because that’s where we keep our reputations with ourselves – I mean, we can’t quite slip the truths we reveal about ourselves at home.
  801. I think a writer is a describer. She describes society and human nature as she sees it. She has to be both typical of that society and alone within it.
  802. I think I have a very American desire and willingness to divulge everything. I would divulge more if I didn’t know it wasn’t smart.
  803. I researched children’s rights, divorce law, and parental kidnapping. Millions of children and parents are touched by the inadequacy of the legal system to deal with the human heart.
  804. I often read poetry to ‘warm up’ before I write.
  805. I often heard Latvians compare Russia and America. Latvians find both countries and their leaders possessed of the same mysterious confidence.
  806. I loved Madeleine L’Engle as a child – ‘A Wrinkle in Time.’
  807. I love writing letters. In order to write a novel in first person, I think I needed an addressee.
  808. I do think, in general, children are so perceptive, and they watch and they get so much, and that’s wonderful. And it’s also difficult for them because they see so much, but they don’t understand.
  809. I certainly want people to like my writing, but I know that if I write with the intention of trying to please people, the writing will not be good because it will not be authentic. So, ironically, I have to be willing to write something strange or unlovable in order to write anything truly good.
  810. For several years before I began ‘The Folded World,’ I worked at an urban college campus and had a job in a tutoring center, and people would come into the tutoring center, and for some reason, they just kept telling me their life stories.
  811. Edan Lepucki sets her debut novel, ‘California,’ somewhere in the 2060s. The nearness of this era helps make her vision both more discomfiting and more credible.
  812. Don’t let anyone tell you there’s only one way to write.
  813. As separate people, we are weak, but we could be a peaceful, powerful nation.
  814. ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ is, to my mind, a work of perfect genius.
  815. When you’re picking up and moving, it does create… well, I can sleep anywhere, which is really useful, it turns out, on movie sets. But what it really does is teach you how to adapt and change and fit into a new group or school, and that really is a lot like turning up to a new movie project and finding your place.
  816. When I was younger, my sister thought it was funny to pretend to punch me in the face because my mom was concerned about my teeth falling out. They were loose for a long time, and she knocked out my teeth.
  817. When I died my hair red the first time, I felt as if it was what nature intended. I have been accused of being a bit of a spitfire, so in that way, I absolutely live up to the stereotype. The red hair suits my personality. I was a terrible blonde!
  818. What I respect in people more than anything is work ethic. And Justin Timberlake’s got that. He works his tail off, and he knows his stuff.
  819. Thirty was a big deal for me. It was the age where I reevaluated everything – how I approached life and how I thought about myself. When I look at my 20s, or when I look at any period in my life, I think about how much time I’ve wasted trying to find the right man.
  820. There’s such a work ethic involved in theatre that you can’t learn in L.A.
  821. The Muppets have such a great tradition of bringing together all of genres of actors and all ages of actors.
  822. That’s how I prepare for anything – I read whatever I can get my hands on, talk to people. I’m a bit of a nerd like that.
  823. Something I’m going to try to really instill in my own family is a lot of tradition. And, I used to have a lot of superstitions, and then I realized that it was kind of hogwash. Once I let go of them, I relaxed a lot.
  824. Some of these actresses or public personas who are very public about their disciplined diets, more power to them. I just don’t see the point. I’m just not going to be one of those people photographed in a bikini where people are like, ‘OMG, look at Amy!’ I mean, it might be OMG, but not for the reasons I want.
  825. School was hard for me. If there had been a school for the creative arts, I might have thrived, but… I needed that creative outlet so much. Also, I’m just bad with numbers.
  826. Perfect isn’t normal, nor is it interesting. I have no features without makeup. I am pale. I have blond lashes. You could just paint my face – it’s like a blank canvas. It can be great for what I do.
  827. Once I moved to L.A., there was a dark moment of trying to keep up with the girls I thought were pretty. Until I realised that’s the stupidest thing you can do because people are so pretty in L.A.!
  828. My natural response to a stressful situation is to shut down. I do weird things, like, I don’t cry, I get really cold.
  829. My job as an actress is to make things work and come up with reasons of my own and not just fill in the blanks for anybody else, you know what I mean?
  830. My dad is a singer. He used to sing in nightclubs, or pizza joints.
  831. Moving out to L.A. for me was a leap of faith. I was very secure in my dinner theater world; I loved it, and I was just like, ‘I think there’s something else out there for me and I just have to go for it.’
  832. Most of the time it’s the parents who recognise me. They try to tell their kids, ‘Look, it’s Giselle,’ and I say, ‘No, no, no, don’t ruin this for them,’ because I’m usually standing there with my hair sideways and no make-up on. And the kid is saying, ‘That is not Giselle. No way. That is some worn-out girl who really needs a bath.’
  833. It’s just very homey in Ireland. It’s very comforting and comfortable. There’s lots of fireplaces with fires. It’s just really cozy.
  834. It’s always challenging when you’re shooting a film. Shooting things out of order and keeping continuity on all levels is always for me the most challenging thing.
  835. In high school, I was so painfully self-aware that how I thought of myself was probably very different from what other people thought of me. I thought of myself as just painfully awkward and dorky. I had a lot of hair and was kind of weird. I sang a lot in the hallways.
  836. If I had a project that I had auditioned for and I was getting close to getting it, I didn’t want to tell anybody because I thought then I wouldn’t get it, but in reality that really had no bearing on whether or not I got a part.
  837. I’m really good at gymnastics, and that’s about it.
  838. I’m pretty Sicilian if I’ve been crossed. I don’t seek revenge, but I never forget. And I make it hard to repair, which is not a great quality because if people held me to that standard, no one would be around me – ever.
  839. I’m one of seven kids. That’ll keep your ego in check.
  840. I’m not the kind of actress who asks a lot of questions of my directors unless it’s something I really need to know.
  841. I’m much more comfortable speaking through my characters’ voices than my own.
  842. I’m like the luckiest girl in the world. I’ve gotten to be a princess, I’ve gotten to work with the Muppets. A lot of my childhood dreams about who I wanted to be when I was a grown-up, I at least get to play them in movies.
  843. I’m just grateful I didn’t have to spend my early 20s in front of paparazzi cameras.
  844. I’d love to be a diva. But I’d then have to send so many apology notes for my abhorrent behaviour.
  845. I would say that a lot of the characters I’ve been attracted to are very vulnerable and they expose themselves emotionally. Not so much in ‘The Fighter,’ not so much in ‘The Master’ – I think those are different.
  846. I watched ‘The Muppet Movie’ obsessively. I can still pretty much say a lot of the lines and do a pretty mean Fozzie Bear.
  847. I was the dork in high school who sang musical numbers up and down the hallways.
  848. I was one of seven, and we took a lot of road trips – long road trips. And this was before iPhones and iPads and DVD players in cars. I remember how novel it was when I got my own Walkman so I could listen to music.
  849. I was a pretty scrappy, tough kid; I got in all sorts of fights at school. I defended myself – boys didn’t mess with me. But as one of seven children, you have to fight for everything anyway.
  850. I used to have a lot of superstitions, and then I realized that it was kind of hogwash. Once I let go of them, I relaxed a lot.
  851. I thought ‘Out of Africa’ would be a beautiful ballet.
  852. I think the kick to doing comedy is just to get in a film with really funny people and let them do their jobs. I find that in most comedies, I’m not the funny one, which works out great.
  853. I think that I’ve always been attracted to characters who are positive and come from a very innocent place. I think there’s a lot of room for discovery in these characters, and that’s something I always have fun playing.
  854. I think a lot of times we don’t pay enough attention to people with a positive attitude because we assume they are naive or stupid or unschooled.
  855. I tend to be really pragmatic, but ultimately tend to be attracted to people who pull me into more spontaneity. I’ve really learned that, through surrender, the best experiences of my life have happened.
  856. I still think I’m like the poor girl from Colorado who worked three jobs to buy a car. That’s still my mentality, so I’ll be walking down the street, and I forget what I do and who I am.
  857. I saw some musicals at dinner theaters where I grew up. But I didn’t go to a big theater to see one until probably after I graduated from high school when I took myself to see ‘Tommy’ when it was on tour. I absolutely loved it.
  858. I research every part thoroughly. I talk it out with my actor friends, but then I throw it all away when I get to the set. You have to be spontaneous.
  859. I probably never would have been hired on Broadway had I not moved out to L.A. and pursued acting and film, which is sad, really.
  860. I love accents – I wish I could find an accent for every one of my characters. It makes it so much easier when I don’t have to hear my own voice.
  861. I like not being noticed. It has been a struggle because I love performing, but if I’m in a group of people and someone has a bigger personality, I’m like, ‘Go ahead, and have fun!’
  862. I like Cinderella, I really do. She has a good work ethic. I appreciate a good, hard-working gal. And she likes shoes. The fairy tale is all about the shoe at the end, and I’m a big shoe girl.
  863. I knew I wanted to be a performer, but I didn’t know I would specifically be in film. I actually never thought I would be in film. I always envisioned being on the stage.
  864. I have worked with some of the meanest people in the world. You can’t do anything to intimidate me.
  865. I have to say I’ve been lucky in that way in that I’ve been able to go from different films and different genres with different challenges.
  866. I have a hard time articulating the emotional experience of working on a film. Even when I have meetings on films or discussing them with directors, I find that’s my biggest challenge. Different words mean different things to people.
  867. I grew up as a Mormon, and that had more of an impact on my values than my beliefs. I’m afraid I will always feel the weight of a lie. I’m very hard on myself anyway. Religious guilt carries over too. You can’t really misbehave without feeling badly about it. At least, I can’t.
  868. I graduated high school and I didn’t have a skill set and I didn’t want to go to college. I needed a job.
  869. I find that it’s the simple things that remind you of family around the holidays.
  870. I do love shoes that make my legs longer. I have the upper body of someone who’s 5ft 8in, so high heels help me even out the discrepancy.
  871. I didn’t necessarily fit in in high school. I felt very awkward. I still feel completely awkward and weird in my body sometimes. I’m hoping that’s going to go away, but I’ve just embraced it as reality.
  872. I didn’t get into acting to have a moment, I got into it because of people who’ve inspired me, like Judi Dench, Holly Hunter, and Jodie Foster.
  873. I come from musical theater, and a lot of musical theater is about accepting fantasy. I think it is more about just being open and accepting.
  874. I always had a larger view. I’m interested in real life – my family, my friends. I have tried never to define myself by my success, whatever that is. My happiness is way beyond roles and awards.
  875. How I work is I work from of very character-driven place. And I trust the writers.
  876. Being pregnant finally helped me understand what my true relationship was with my body – meaning that it wasn’t put on this earth to look good in a swimsuit.
  877. Being an actress hasn’t made me insecure. I was insecure long before I declared I was an actress.
  878. As an actress people always tease me like: if there’s anything you can do to make yourself unattractive you will do it.
  879. You know, parenting is so personal. And we’re all afraid that we didn’t quite get it right. And it feels like the stakes are so high. By we – what if we made a mistake?
  880. You know, I think it’s so ironic that we’re calling hard work, striving for excellence, don’t blame others, you know, don’t give up, that we’re calling these, quote, ‘Chinese values,’ ’cause I always thought of them as American values.
  881. You can’t invent Google, Facebook or the iPod unless you’ve mastered the basics, are willing to put in long hours and can pick yourself up from the floor when life knocks you down the first 10 times.
  882. You can coddle your child and tell them, ‘You’re the best no matter what.’ But in the end, when they go out into the real world, I think it’s pretty tough out there and other children are cruel.
  883. When my kids wanted to give up on things, I wouldn’t let them, and those are lifelong lessons.
  884. When my children were young, I was very cocky. I thought I could maintain total control.
  885. When I’m not the Tiger Mom, I’m a professor at Yale Law School, and if one thing is clear to me from years of teaching, it’s that there are many ways to produce fabulous kids. I have amazing students; some of them have strict parents, others have lenient parents, and many come from family situations that defy easy description.
  886. When I was little, my parents really only wanted me to be a scientist or a doctor; they had never even heard of law school. I think even these days if you were to tell your mother you want to be a fashion designer, or an artist or a writer, a lot of Asian parents would be alarmed because they don’t think that’s a secure career.
  887. What the Chinese parent is conveying to the child is not that ‘you’ve got to get A’s or else I won’t like you.’ On the contrary, it’s, ‘I believe in you so much, I know that you can be excellent.’
  888. Westerners often laud their children as ‘talented’ or ‘gifted’, while Asian parents highlight the importance of hard work. And in fact, research performed by Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck has found that the way parents offer approval affects the way children perform, even the way they feel about themselves.
  889. We all want to do the right thing for our children. We all don’t know what that is and we all – you know, you won’t know until the future.
  890. To be honest, I know that a lot of Asian parents are secretly shocked and horrified by many aspects of Western parenting.
  891. Tiger parenting is all about raising independent, creative, courageous kids. In America today, there’s a dangerous tendency to romanticize creativity in a way that may undermine it.
  892. There’s something suspicious about saying, ‘I’m just going to leave my child alone and let her pursue her passions.’ You know what? I think most 13-year-olds’ passion is sitting in front of the TV, or doing Facebook, or surfing the Internet for hours.
  893. There’s a lot of rudeness and sullen behavior and kids that are very entitled and spoiled, just buy me more stuff. I didn’t want to raise kids like that.
  894. The most successful hyperpowers are the ones where there was actual intermixing. Tang dynasty China was China’s golden age, and contrary to what I was told when I was growing up, Tang China was founded by a man who by today’s standards was no more than half Chinese. It was a mixed-blood dynasty that pulled in ‘barbarians’ from the steppe.
  895. The Romans thought of themselves as the chosen people, yet they built the greatest army on Earth by recruiting warriors from any background.
  896. The Chinese mom is not the helicopter mom. I would never do their homework for them. It’s all about: Take responsibility, don’t blame others. Be self-reliant. Never blame the teacher.
  897. The Chinese model calls for giving your kids very little choice – and I’ve come to see that you can go too far with that. On the other hand, I also believe that Western parents sometimes give their young kids too much choice.
  898. Some people don’t need parental commitment, they will still come out great, but for others, parents can be critical in providing moral and academic guidance.
  899. Some people are just self-motivated – my husband was. I also believe there are many children for whom parental involvement is key.
  900. Some parents let their kids sleep at other people’s houses, where they drink alcohol, watch TV for hours and God knows what else. But if you say you have to get all A’s and practice the violin for two hours, then they consider that abusive. That upsets me.
  901. Real self-esteem has to be earned. I also believe in virtuous circles, like, nothing is fun until you are good at it. It is great if you can instill in children the ability to not give up, to have a work ethic.
  902. Questioning authority is, I think, a great thing to instill in children. I just didn’t have enough of that when I was little.
  903. Parenting is the hardest thing I have ever done. I tried to find the balance between the strict, traditional Chinese way I was raised, which I think can be too harsh, and what I see as a tendency in the West to be too permissive and indulgent. If I could do it all again, I would, with some adjustments.
  904. Once you get to the Enlightenment, the way that powers get to be hyperpowers isn’t just by conquest. It’s through commerce and innovation. Societies like the Dutch Republic and the United States used tolerance to become a magnet for enterprising immigrants.
  905. Oddly enough, I’m not a particularly judgmental person. I just don’t have a lot of filtering when I’m in ‘tiger mother’ mode. I say what comes into my head.
  906. My youngest sister, Cindy, has Down syndrome, and I remember my mother spending hours and hours with her, teaching her to tie her shoelaces on her own, drilling multiplication tables with Cindy, practicing piano every day with her. No one expected Cindy to get a Ph.D.! But my mom wanted her to be the best she could be, within her limits.
  907. My children grew up with one Western parent. My husband doesn’t believe in raising his voice with the kids and we don’t spank. They were really raised in a half-Asian family.
  908. Kids raised to be pampered and spoiled don’t really end up being good leaders. Leaders need to be independent minded and confident.
  909. It may be the optimist in me, but I think America has a uniquely powerful and capacious glue internally. The American identity has always been ethnically and religiously neutral, so within one generation you have Italian-Americans, Irish-Americans, Chinese-Americans, Jamaican-Americans – they feel American. It’s a huge success story.
  910. Instilling a sense of self-discipline and focus when the kids are younger makes it so much easier by the time they get into high school.
  911. In Chinese culture, it wouldn’t occur to kids to question or talk back to their parents. In American culture, kids in books, TV shows and movies constantly score points with their snappy back talk. Typically, it’s the parents who need to be taught a life lesson – by their children.
  912. I’m willing to be different than other parents and go against the mainstream.
  913. I’m suggesting that, ironically, the secret to becoming a world ‘hyperpower’ is tolerance. If you look at history, you see great powers being very tolerant in their rise to global dominance.
  914. I’m a slave to my dogs and go out with them almost every day. They are poorly behaved if they don’t run. They really act up.
  915. I’m a proud strict mom and, you know, I’m really proud of the two daughters I’ve raised. And I’m especially proud of my relationship with them. We’re very close. I think we’re good friends.
  916. I worry that by losing my temper so much and being so harsh and yelling so much that, by example, I will have taught my daughters to be that way, and I’m now constantly telling them not to do that.
  917. I was the one that in a very overconfident immigrant way thought I knew exactly how to raise my kids. My husband was much more typical. He had a lot of anxiety; he didn’t think he knew all the right choices. And, I was the one willing to put in the hours.
  918. I was raised, myself, by extremely strict but also extremely loving Chinese immigrant parents. To this day, I believe that their having high expectations for me, coupled with love, was the greatest gift that anyone’s ever given me. And so that’s why, even though my husband is not Chinese, I try to raise my own two daughters the same way.
  919. I was raised by extremely strict – but also extremely loving – Chinese immigrant parents, and I had the most wonderful childhood! I remember laughing constantly with my parents – my dad is a real character and very funny. I certainly did wish they allowed to me do more things!
  920. I think there are many ways to raise great kids. From what I can tell, Ayelet Waldman’s kids are interesting, strong, and happy, and if that’s the case, that’s good parenting.
  921. I think the biggest difference is that I’ve noticed Western parents seem much more concerned about their children’s psyches, their self-esteem, whereas tough immigrant parents assume strength rather than fragility in their children and therefore behave completely differently.
  922. I think if you’re a ‘tiger parent’ early on, you don’t need to be a ‘helicopter parent’ in high school.
  923. I sort of feel like people are not that honest about their own parenting. Take any teenage household; tell me there is not yelling and conflict.
  924. I see my upbringing as a great success story. By disciplining me, my parents inculcated self-discipline. And by restricting my choices as a child, they gave me so many choices in my life as an adult. Because of what they did then, I get to do the work I love now.
  925. I say ‘I love you’ to my daughters every day.
  926. I saw my parents come over. They were immigrants, they had no money. My dad wore the same pair of shoes, I had some ugly clothes growing up, and I never had any privileges. In some ways, I think the person that I am now, I think it’s good that I had that kind of tough upbringing.
  927. I really feel that most things are difficult at the beginning and they become fun, something you love, only after you’ve worked at them. Making children do something hard can, in the long run, be a great parental service.
  928. I once won a second prize in a history concert. My parents came to the ceremony. Somebody else had won the prize for best all-around student. Afterwards my father said to me, ‘Never, ever disgrace me like that again.’ When I tell my Western friends, they are aghast. But I adore my father. It didn’t knock my self-esteem at all.
  929. I kind of – I like my life; I feel I have lots of opportunities. And my parents actually having had such high expectations for me – I would say it’s the greatest gift that anyone has ever given me. I complained a lot when I was little, but that’s how I feel now. And that’s why I tried to do the same with my two daughters.
  930. I do think that maybe, even subconsciously, a lot of parents in the West are wondering, have we gone too far in the direction of coddling and protecting – you know, you see kids, sometimes that seem very rude and disrespectful. And the more important thing is they don’t seem that happy.
  931. I do play tennis, but I don’t really like competition. I’m supposed to be so intense, but I hate competition.
  932. I do not think there was anything abusive in my house. Yet, I stand by a lot of my critiques of Western parenting. I think there’s a lot of questions about how you instill true self-esteem.
  933. I do believe that when your child does poorly on a test, your first step should not necessarily be to attack the teacher or the school’s curriculum. It should be to look at the idea that, maybe, the child didn’t work hard enough.
  934. I am definitely a Type A personality, always rushing around, trying to do too much, not good at just lying on the beach. But I’m so thankful for everything I have: wonderfully supportive parents and sisters, the best husband in the world, terrific students I love teaching and hanging out with, and above all, my two amazing daughters.
  935. Happiness is not always through success. Equally, the constant pursuit of success is sure unhappiness. But we have to find the balance. My own thoughts are that parenting is very personal. And we all feel enormous insecurity about parenting. What are they going to think of us 20 years down the line?
  936. Genghis Khan decreed religious tolerance for all of his conquered peoples. So I think he definitely would approve of our constitutional protections of freedom of religion. I think he would also approve of the way the U.S. has been able to attract talented people from all over the world.
  937. For my senior prom, my father finally said I could go – as long as I was home by 9 P.M.! That was around the time that most people were heading out. When I was little I was so mad at them all the time. ‘Why can’t I do this?’ ‘Why are there so many rules?’ But looking back now, my parents gave me the foundation to have so many choices in life.
  938. Everything I do as a mother builds on a foundation of love and compassion.
  939. Don’t assume your child is weak. If you, the parent, assume that they can’t take anymore, what kind of signal are you sending them?
  940. China is doing lots of things right. It’s investing in education and R&D, it’s opening up, it’s more cosmopolitan than it’s ever been. I think it’s very likely that China will continue to explode economically and certainly become a superpower.
  941. China cannot pull in the best and brightest from all over the world. It’s an ethnically defined nation, the opposite of an immigrant nation. You don’t see a lot of American engineers trying to be Chinese citizens.
  942. Both of my girls have very high self-esteem because they were both able to master certain things; I should think that’s good for their confidence.
  943. A lot of parents today are terrified that something they say to their children might make them ‘feel bad.’ But, hey, if they’ve done something wrong, they should feel bad. Kids with a sense of responsibility, not entitlement, who know when to experience gratitude and humility, will be better at navigating the social shoals of college.
  944. A Western upbringing tends to stress questioning authority, which is always asking why, why, why.
  945. You have to treat people gently because we’re all in a process. What might seem like a good idea to somebody at 21 is probably not going to seem like a good idea at 50, but you don’t know that until you get there.
  946. Without black, no color has any depth. But if you mix black with everything, suddenly there’s shadow – no, not just shadow, but fullness. You’ve got to be willing to mix black into your palette if you want to create something that’s real.
  947. When I was younger, I just thought that my plans were probably going to be more exciting than my parents’ plans or the establishment. I sort of got by on being a little bit of a rebel.
  948. When I look back at the pictures of our blended family the day Vince and I married, he and I are smiling, and all the children are frowning.
  949. What might seem like a good idea to somebody at 21 is probably not going to seem like a good idea at 50, but you don’t know that until you get there.
  950. To me, the real thrill is in making the music, and then I just trust it to find its own audience, and at times it’s big and at times it’s small, but that’s beyond my control.
  951. To me, it’s all about the song. Songs are what make me excited. You hear a great song and you want to record it or get a great idea and you want to write it.
  952. There’s a beauty to wisdom and experience that cannot be faked. It’s impossible to be mature without having lived.
  953. There is not a formula for the way that God heals. There’s not a timetable.
  954. The song ‘Baby Baby,’ I so love that song because I wrote it about my first daughter.
  955. The people I’ve been exposed to have been people of amazing integrity.
  956. The most consistent musical experience I had growing up was church music.
  957. The more time you invest in a marriage, the more valuable it becomes.
  958. The great thing about a song is that no one has to know your story. But if you tell it in a way that has clarity and means something to somebody else, then it can apply to their story.
  959. The fact of the matter is, when I’m on tour, I’m juggling so hard to keep all the balls in the air that I don’t often get to really enjoy what I’m out there doing.
  960. Thanksgiving Day is a good day to recommit our energies to giving thanks and just giving.
  961. Somebody who has been in a very bad wreck is going to be very conscientious about not speeding through a yellow light… You just learn so many good lessons when you go through a failed marriage.
  962. Since I travel so much, it’s always great to be home. There’s nothing like getting to raid my own refrigerator at two in the morning.
  963. Rich Mullins was the uneasy conscience of Christian music. He didn’t live like a star. He’d taken a vow of poverty so that what he earned could be used to help others.
  964. Real relationship is gritty and earthy, the stuff that life is made of.
  965. People are going to come into your life that need you, and being there for them makes the day worth living. People are going to come into your life that you need, and that’s the really crazy thing.
  966. Life is a process, and you just take it a day at a time, and you can’t live in tomorrow, and you can’t reach back and be in yesterday. No matter how much you want to, you just have what’s right there in front of you.
  967. Life goes by really fast, and it seems that there are times when you’re burying a lot of friends and family. And then there are times that feel really precious and everybody is doing okay. This is one of those times.
  968. It’s human nature to be curious about people, and to be more curious about young people than old people. We want to cheer something on at the same time we want to tear it down. That’s just so normal.
  969. In the past, when I’d recorded during a break in a tour, it was so easy to sing, because I felt strong. Also, like so many new mothers, I wasn’t getting a lot of sleep, and sleeping is such a huge part of being able to sing.
  970. If you went to your closet today, would you pull out the same outfit you wore 10 or 15 years ago? You wear feelings and faith differently as well.
  971. I’ve found that music allows years to fold like an accordion over each other, so I guess you don’t feel the passage of time as much.
  972. I’m not anxious to be anywhere other than where I am right now.
  973. I’m frustrated by something, it’s my fault for exposing myself to it in the first place. The rumor mill always seemed like a grass fire to me. Why walk out in the middle of the field, it’s just going to flame out and go away just like everything else does?
  974. I write about everything, but I just – how faith filters through all that and colors your opinion of other people and life and all that.
  975. I was taught a lot of Bible at home and had a voracious appetite for reading the Bible.
  976. I think what I mostly realize is just that life is unpredictable. So don’t be afraid, but just enjoy the day you’re in. Really make the most of it.
  977. I think the first time you try anything in a public way, you feel really exposed.
  978. I think that if my kids are completely convinced of God’s unfailing love for them, whether they fail or not, they’ll have confidence to persevere in life.
  979. I think our culture encourages all of us to always put our best foot forward. I think it’s a good thing. I think it’s nice to rise to the occasion, to be kind and considerate, and have self control.
  980. I think for a woman, the hardest thing about growing old is becoming invisible. There’s something very front and center about being young.
  981. I think a woman can have all of the ideas and mental pictures. She can be a real planner and a motivator. But in the end, I think a woman does best when she responds to a man.
  982. I started my teenage years singing in churches across America, and finally wound up on a big stage.
  983. I never thought getting older would be so great. But when it comes to depression, I have experienced less the older I’ve gotten.
  984. I need music like I need water.
  985. I love being with my children. They’re fascinating people.
  986. I know my own weaknesses as a human being, and as a musician, as a singer and as a woman.
  987. I just think people should find the music that helps them through the day and enjoy that. I’ve never felt like, if somebody does or doesn’t like what I’m doing, it’s a morality issue.
  988. I just think music is such a beautiful thing. It lifts the heart and buoys up your spirits – all kinds of music.
  989. I have spent probably years of time waiting in studio lounges – waiting on a mix, waiting on my time to sing, waiting on, waiting on, waiting on. That’s just the nature of life.
  990. I feel a part of the congregation. I’ve never had to do special music. The kids sing in the choir. It’s just normal. We’re treated like everybody else.
  991. I don’t write songs that don’t affect me on some level, because I figure if I am not moved by it, if its not something that I have a longing to celebrate or to be reminded of, if it doesn’t affect me, then how can I possibly think it is going to affect somebody else. My touchstone is write something that matters.
  992. I did the best I could, and in some arenas, my best was not good enough. I’ve made some bad choices.
  993. I can look back at different times in my life when I felt I could not find my way out of whatever it was. I’m not necessarily talking about marriage, but I wanted to pack it in. I wanted to disappear. A lot of that has to do with being in the public eye.
  994. I can look at the future with anticipation. And it’s comforting to know that someday, as Christians, we’ll be able to look back and have a little more clarity on why certain things in life happened.
  995. How we absorb music is unique. I know what I do. When I’m listening to music, I tend to find myself in a song. That’s what really makes you connect is if you feel what that song is saying.
  996. Get outside. Watch the sunrise. Watch the sunset. How does that make you feel? Does it make you feel big or tiny? Because there’s something good about feeling both.
  997. For me, the backdrop of half the experiences of life includes music.
  998. Faith is salted and peppered through everything at Christmas. And I love at least one night by the Christmas tree to sing and feel the quiet holiness of that time that’s set apart to celebrate love, friendship, and God’s gift of the Christ child.
  999. Everybody’s entitled to think whatever they want and to express that, but my personal day-to-day experience does not come into contact with any of those people.
  1000. Every good relationship, especially marriage, is based on respect. If it’s not based on respect, nothing that appears to be good will last very long.