1. I’d like to keep our kids in their schools. I’d like to keep our young men and women in jobs.
  2. I would say to young entrepreneurs and budding philanthropists – are you giving to feel good or do good?
  3. I will always put family first. Every time I haven’t, I have regretted it and apologised.
  4. I really do think I can make a contribution in helping eliminate the disparity here in Australia and doing my small bit to help eliminate slavery around the world. These are huge issues for our fellow countrymen and our fellows in the world, where slavery is growing at an alarming rate, and it needs to be arrested.
  5. I happen to be a big believer in home ownership. I’m also a big believer that if someone wants to have a crack at the mining industry in Port Hedland, then they should be able to collect their… benefits in Port Hedland even though they are from Alice Springs. It should be mobile.
  6. I don’t see why, if you look at how the Australian culture and psyche is, that we can’t be amongst the most generous, from the grassroots up, nations in the world.
  7. I don’t necessarily go to church every week, but I am a Christian, and I believe in God and Jesus Christ.
  8. Disparity is Australia’s worst social problem. Thousands of lives are slowly being crushed, while billions are wasted on thousands of little initiatives trying to ‘close the gap.’
  9. Australia has always encouraged the little bloke to have a go, the Aussie battler to get up.
  10. All industry, not just the mining industry, can get out and give Aboriginal companies a chance.
  11. You should be able to choose which hospital you go to.
  12. You don’t come into government thinking it is going to be easy.
  13. You can’t simply slash the sugar in food; otherwise, people simply won’t accept it.
  14. You all know my commitment to the National Health Service. While I am Secretary of State, the NHS will never be fragmented, privatised or undermined. I am personally committed to an NHS which gives equal access, and excellent care.
  15. When you have an election campaign,it has to be simple and something everybody can relate to.
  16. We will never privatise the National Health Service.
  17. We will empower patients as well as health professionals. We will disempower the hierarchy and bureaucracy.
  18. We should not make the mistake of equating the E.U. with Europe. Outside the E.U., we wouldn’t cease to be Europeans. But, an exit would definitely risk losing those opportunities for our children while growing no similar opportunities elsewhere.
  19. We must not constantly talk about tackling obesity and warning people about the negative consequences of obesity. Instead we must be positive – positive about the fun and benefits to be had from healthy living, trying to get rid of people’s excuses for being obese by tackling the issue in a positive way.
  20. We must aim for a zero-tolerance approach to hospital-acquired infections; we have to be clear about who’s in charge at ward level, so there’s proper accountability, and we need to reduce the reliance on agency nursing staff.
  21. We know, in Wales or in England – you simply can’t trust Labour on the NHS. In England, we are delivering for patients while Labour just use the NHS as a political football. We won’t let them; we’ll always fight for the NHS.
  22. We have to treat smoking as a major public health issue. We have to reduce the extent to which young people start smoking, and one of the issues is the extent to which display of cigarettes and brands does draw young people into smoking in the first place.
  23. We have had significant success in the reduction of salt in food, but it has to be understood that this can only be achieved working with the industry on a voluntary basis… and it can only be done on an incremental basis.
  24. Underperforming hospitals or units should accept that they have to improve the service they offer or that patients, quite properly, will go elsewhere.
  25. There’s a culture inside the NHS that is highly paternalistic. You know, ‘We give them the service and they are grateful.’ We have to move to shared decision-making.
  26. The vast majority of people who speak to me say they have had brilliant care. When they are critical, their concern tends not to be directed at the medical side but the ancillary things that surround it, such as helping patients to eat meals, cleanliness, and making sure that when patients have a problem, they are listened to.
  27. The job of the government – and my responsibility – is to help people live healthier lives. The framework is about giving local authorities the ability to focus on the most effective ways to improve the public’s health and reduce health inequalities, long-term, from cradle to grave.
  28. The culture is about moving to a place where tobacco and smoking isn’t part of normal life: people don’t encounter it normally, they don’t see it in their big supermarkets, they don’t see people smoking in public places, they don’t see tobacco vending machines.
  29. The Transparency Bill is something we should all support – practical steps in promoting an open and accountable democracy.
  30. The NHS should be proactively using substantial resources across government to intervene and try to deliver positive improvements in people’s standards of living.
  31. The NHS is a national organisation, but it is best delivered locally.
  32. Tell people that biology and the environment cause obesity and they are offered the one thing we have to avoid: an excuse. As it is, people who see more fat people around them may themselves be more likely to gain weight.
  33. Tackling the environment should not be a licence to lecture people, because they have no excuse not to exercise, or eat their fruit and vegetables. Nannying – at least among adults – is likely to be counterproductive. Providing information is empowering; lecturing people is not. So, no excuses, no nannying.
  34. Safe care saves lives and saves money. Adverse events like high levels of infection, blood clots or falls in hospital, emergency readmissions and pressure sores cost the NHS billions of pounds every year. There is a serious human cost, too, with patients ending up injured, or even dead. Most are avoidable with the right care.
  35. Peer pressure and social norms are powerful influences on behaviour, and they are classic excuses.
  36. Our interaction as patients with the NHS should be on the basis that there’s a presumption that all information is shared with us.
  37. Not reforming the NHS would have been a much easier decision for me as secretary of state to have taken. We could have just protected the NHS from cuts, put in an extra £12.5bn and left it there. But sooner or later the cracks would have started to show. New treatments would have been held back.
  38. Jamie Oliver, quite rightly, was talking about trying to improve the diet of children in schools and improving school meals, but the net effect was the number of children eating school meals in many of these places didn’t go up, it went down.
  39. It is more important to engage the public positively with choice and competition to everyone than to be directed into a benefit for a minority.
  40. It is in my heart that I believe most strongly that our future is within a reformed E.U. – not least because we now live in a global marketplace.
  41. In the first speech I delivered as health secretary, I made one thing perfectly clear: we need a cultural shift in the NHS: from a culture responsive mainly to orders from the top down to one responsive to patients, in which patient safety is put first.
  42. If, over time, patients don’t go to some services, then progressively they become less viable, so you do arrive at a point where the conclusion is: ‘These are the right services for the future, and this is capacity we don’t need.’
  43. If, like me, nothing is more important to you than our children’s future, then their opportunities must be protected.
  44. If I’m serious about patients and their GPs being able to have more control of their health care, I can’t have a top-down system that imposes restrictions on the services they need.
  45. I’m not going to go mystery shopping in the NHS because we have a million people every day using it and rating its facilities.
  46. I was shadow health secretary for six years, and the beauty of being in opposition – if there is any beauty – is that you tend to get a pretty unvarnished view because no one bothers to paint the coal white before you turn up.
  47. I want to make it clear that the lobbying sector does an important job. It is very useful to the government to hear the views of a broad range of groups to make sure we get the best.
  48. I think we have to understand that sugar is an essential component of food; it’s just that sugar in excess is an inappropriate and unhelpful diet.
  49. I know that nurses are not only the largest healthcare profession but are responsible for the delivery of most healthcare, and are often in the best place to be able to see the whole pathway of care.
  50. I have spent too long with too many people who have lost loved ones to healthcare-associated infections not to be determined to act on this. There is no tolerable level of preventable infections. The only acceptable strategy is a zero-tolerance strategy.
  51. I didn’t go into politics because I wanted to win a popularity contest.
  52. I became a Conservative in the late 1980s because I could see that the Conservative party had transformed Britain’s economy and our standing in the world compared to Labour in the 1980s.
  53. I am not saying do not give people equal health services but do not pretend that giving more money for diabetes or chronic diseases means you are going to deal with the origins of health inequalities.
  54. Go to any hospital, you’ll find wards that are run by senior nurses with matrons. The point is do they have the power, do they have the responsibility inside the hospital?
  55. Experience in other countries shows how big money, rather than the best political candidate, can influence politics.
  56. Especially some of the poorest in our society need to have the greatest support because health inequalities are too wide.
  57. As part of the E.U., my children can have the freedom and the opportunity to work and live across Europe; to be ambitious in the world’s largest market; and to access so much of the history, the culture and the opportunity which is our common European heritage.
  58. As a Coalition Government, we inherited a legacy of lack of trust and confidence in political system.
  59. You’re the luckiest person in the entire world if you know what you really want to do, which I was lucky enough to know when I was very young. And you’re the luckiest person in the world if you can then make a living out of it.
  60. You never know what will happen. There is a thing called zeitgeist. You have to hit it.
  61. You cannot help but notice that schools that take music seriously tend to be more academically successful.
  62. You can’t just sort of come with, say, ‘Yesterday,’ or ‘A Hard Day’s Night,’ and it be in the wrong place in the wrong show, and expect the song to work theatrically.
  63. Where I have come unstuck sometimes has mostly been to do with the stories not being quite right or not connecting with a contemporary audience.
  64. When we finally came to start work on this, the joy was it was only Joel and I, we didn’t have to answer to anybody, and we didn’t have to submit a screen play or anything like that. We just wrote it and then made it.
  65. What strikes me is that there’s a very fine line between success and failure. Just one ingredient can make the difference.
  66. What I can’t tell is, I don’t know if there’s a subliminal resistance to the idea of a sequel to ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ anyway.
  67. Well we’d just seen Gerry. I think he wanted somebody who had that authority and was handsome. The thing is, he’s a big hunk isn’t he? All I can say, if you look at his chat line, or the Phantom website, it’s quite worrying. Because the girls really seem to love him.
  68. Well the least favourite question is the one that one’s asked particularly about in Japan is what’s the difference between theatre and cinema and I think, well, that’s about eighty bucks.
  69. We try to get the best performance out of the artists. There is no point in saying to them, ‘You’re useless.’
  70. We felt we had to know something of his back story. I don’t think people in the cinema would just accept that he’s there. I think we had to learn how he (got there).
  71. We don’t have butlers. Obviously we have people who look after the houses, but I try not to run things formally.
  72. Two years ago I hadn’t even thought of the Woman in White, and I was doing a television show and I said I hadn’t found a story and the next day somebody rang me and said have you ever thought of the Woman in White.
  73. Two pieces of advice for young composers: Go away during technical rehearsals. And do not have a back operation.
  74. Together, we can nurture the talent of the future and bring the empowering force of music and the arts to a new generation.
  75. They should go back to the medieval tradition, which is that the nave of the church is always used for local business.
  76. There’s no getting around it: Writing is hard, while working with young performers is nearly always a joy.
  77. The regrets in the theatre have always been the shows that you know ought to have worked but for one reason or another haven’t.
  78. The plot of my ‘Phantom’ is pretty much mine. It’s based on the Gaston Leroux book – I’ve taken a lot of liberties with it.
  79. The one thing I have always felt about musical theatre is that it is, to an extraordinary degree, about construction.
  80. The next few years are going to be horrendous in the UK. The last thing we need is a Somali pirate-style raid on the few wealth creators who still dare to navigate Britain’s gale-force waters.
  81. The moment the doctor said he wanted to do a biopsy, in my heart I thought I’d probably got it. But I also know a lot of people who have also had prostate cancer, so I had a reasonably good idea what to expect.
  82. The fact is that ‘The Wizard Of Oz’ has never really worked in the theatre. The film has one or two holes where, in the theatre, you need a song. For example, there’s nothing for either of the two witches to sing.
  83. The arts are the one thing that appeal right across all forms of politics, race, creed – everything.
  84. Surely, you go to the theater because you want to have a great evening in the theater.
  85. Superstar was made so early in my career I had nothing to do with it at all. The first time I saw it was the opening screening.
  86. Sometimes I get the story wrong, or it’s the wrong story, and then things don’t work.
  87. Since ‘School of Rock’ opened, for the first time in my career, ever, really, I’ve had a lot of projects offered to me. It’s extraordinary. Normally, I’ve initiated them all myself.
  88. People like to put you into a box. I’m afraid I don’t sit in a box.
  89. People in Britain always think of ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ as a musical – it wasn’t.
  90. One would be lying if one didn’t say that one had melodies that I keep in my back pocket.
  91. Nothing will ever be as big as ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ for me.
  92. Nobody ever thinks that the work they’re going to do could ever be bigger than the one they do before, especially if you’re lucky enough like I had to have such a huge thing as ‘Phantom’ was.
  93. Negative things, and they were all deliberate and I’m not going to say who they were but I know who they were and it was in the business, and that’s not a good sign.
  94. My wife says I can’t remember if she has milk in coffee.
  95. My love of musical theater was certainly not typical. I mean, it was considered to be very, very abnormal, in fact!
  96. Musicals are very collaborative. Unless you find somebody who wants to do something with you and has equal commitment, it’s not going to work.
  97. Musical theatre history is littered with bad reviews for now classic pieces.
  98. Music, architecture and pictures have always been my passions, and all that material wealth has meant for me, is being able to have some of the pictures I liked.
  99. Mobiles mean people know where you are.
  100. Making good television is what Simon Cowell does. That’s his business.
  101. It’s interesting that the wondrous ‘Hamilton,’ which I could not be more ecstatic about, has taken a long time to perfect to bring it to Broadway. And it wouldn’t have been possible if it was developed in the commercial theatre from the get-go.
  102. It never occurred to me that ‘Phantom of the Opera’ was the sort of subject that I’d want to do, because I just thought it was something that would be a bit jokey. ‘Til I read the book.
  103. It must have been an extraordinary time. I guess the worrying thing about musical theatre to me, is if you look at the London season this year, mine is actually the only one to have come in.
  104. It may sound amazing to people today, but Rodgers and Hammerstein were considered by – how can I put it? – the sort of opinion-making tastemakers and everything to be ‘off the scale as sentimental.’
  105. It doesn’t stand up to huge intellectual scrutiny.
  106. In Evita I wasn’t really hugely involved with it. I gave a little bit of help but they needed a bit of technical help on the movie and so some of my music people went in at the end of the movie and helped out with it.
  107. If you look at my career… I couldn’t possibly have chosen those subjects if I was thinking, ‘That’s a great commercial idea.’ I’m not aware of a great musical where someone has done that.
  108. If you know what you want to do, as I always loved musicals, and then to have been lucky enough to be successful with them, I think that’s all you can ask isn’t it? I think I don’t really think too much about it. I am a bit shy socially, yeah, I admit that.
  109. If you just want ten songs to fit somebody else’s script, then I’m not really the composer for that.
  110. I’ve often thought that we left the original ‘Phantom’ with a little bit of a cliff hanger, and I thought, ‘Well, why not to do a sequel to it’ at one point.
  111. I’ve got to find something and if I find something that I like, I’ll do it. If I don’t, I won’t.
  112. I’ve a rare Turkish swimming cat.
  113. I’m wondering whether to have someone go around with my mobile to completely throw everybody off the scent. I could appear in weird places.
  114. I’m not a critic, and I never talk about other people’s work.
  115. I’m going to take the kids away over Christmas but I don’t, I’ve written 14 musicals now, I don’t want to rush into doing something just for the sake of doing it. I want to do it when I find a story.
  116. I’m alive. I have my music; I have my children. I am the luckiest man.
  117. I’m a ladies’ man who can never make love. I’m resigned to that.
  118. I’m a composer, and therefore I know when I’ve written a good tune. When you’ve written a good song is when you know that the lyric is completely coalesced with the song.
  119. I would have gone right ahead but the only thing, the only phenomenon that’s going on now of course, which is different in my experiences, is that you are getting things planted in the Net by people about the Woman in White on the Net. That’s not a nice change.
  120. I wonder what would have happened if automation and computers had existed when ‘Oklahoma!’ was having its out-of-town try-out, and three days before closing in Boston, when it was still called ‘Away We Go,’ they added a new song called ‘Oklahoma!’ I don’t think that could happen today. It’s almost impossible to change musicals on the go now.
  121. I was about 10, and I was supposed to be playing the piano at the school concert, and I got up in front of the whole school and said, ‘I’m sorry. I’m changing the agenda. I want to play some songs I’ve written.’
  122. I want to get every church in the country on Wi-Fi.
  123. I think the thing’s that perhaps sad really is that younger people haven’t come in and I think it must have been absolutely fantastic to have worked in the 50’s when you had all of the great Broadway composers and when West Side Story didn’t win the Tony Award.
  124. I think that the wonderful advantage we have in the film of being able to cast a girl as young as Emmy and which we couldn’t do in the theatre of course because no girl of 16 or 17 could sing 8 shows a week, couldn’t sing two.
  125. I think back at the time, if it had been 1988, I would have thought Michael and Sarah probably would have been cast but I don’t think, I think it’s much better that the girl is younger and if Sarah would have been 26 or 27 then.
  126. I think Michael Crawford realised, I think we all realised, once we’d gone the route of casting a very young girl, you can’t really cast a 65 year old man opposite. Slightly different resonance I think. No, we weren’t going to go there. We’d have Jack Nicholson in the lead.
  127. I said, look, do you think you could bring Gerry through, and they said yeah, absolutely, they thought that. Joel was very keen to cast him. If all my music team were happy, I was happy.
  128. I remember, once I was going through Nice airport with Roger Moore, and these kids came up and asked for our autographs. Afterwards, Roger said, ‘It must be very strange for you. I’m an actor, and signing autographs is part of what I do. But you’re a public figure who people don’t really know.’ He was right.
  129. I put a hell of a lot of myself into ‘Love Never Dies,’ and I felt quite drained afterwards.
  130. I often think of random melodies. And I pretty much hear in my head what I want to do with the orchestra as I’m writing on the piano.
  131. I often think how lucky we were with ‘Jesus Christ Superstar.’
  132. I never wanted to be a performer. I suppose I was precocious, really.
  133. I mean I don’t really think about it. You know, do you know what I often say to myself? I think you’re very lucky in life if you know what you want to do.
  134. I loved medieval architecture when I was very small; I don’t know why.
  135. I knew nothing about film at all. I suppose the biggest surprise is all these things. In the theatre we sort of do, I might do two or three key interviews and that would be it.
  136. I haven’t written a score that’s going to change the Western world or the musical as we presently know it.
  137. I have lived and worked in Britain all my life. Not even in the dark days of penal Labour taxation in the Seventies did I have any intention of leaving the country of my birth.
  138. I have always tried with my shows – win, lose, or draw – to take the boundaries of music as far as I can.
  139. I have a very strong will.
  140. I guess we’ve had a very close relationship because I don’t pretend to know about cinema and I think I do know a bit about theatre but he does, he respected that and so we really just had a collaboration which went completely like this.
  141. I guess the thing is that we remained huge friends after the original Phantom movie, when we decided it wouldn’t take place and we just saw each other socially over the years so we were friends.
  142. I got known as the school swot, which wasn’t me at all.
  143. I don’t think I am that materialistic, actually. Obviously at home in the country the art collection is important, but we have one big room in the middle of the house where we do everything – the television, the kitchen, everything.
  144. I don’t really care very much if I don’t think that the critics really understand music.
  145. I don’t know what really makes a great musical or not. In the end, you write it, and you write it because you want to write it.
  146. I do want to write again. I hope to. But it’s also important for me to realize, as I get older, that I don’t have to be doing everything all at once.
  147. I began to think, now is the time. I found quite a lot of opposition in Hollywood about the idea of doing a film musical and we ended up having to buy the rights back. I’m glad we did because it meant John and I were able to make exactly the movie we wanted.
  148. Here’s the truth. The proposed top rate of income tax is not 50 per cent. It is 50 per cent plus 1.5 per cent national insurance paid by employees plus 13.3 per cent paid by employers. That’s not 50 per cent. Two years from now, Britain will have the highest tax rate on earned income of any developed country.
  149. Glenn Slater is my lyricist who, of the new young lyricists coming along, is the most exciting, I think.
  150. Disgracefully, the arts have too often borne the brunt of short-sighted cuts to educational budgets.
  151. Corny answer is of course is that everyone who wants musicals are children in different ways, aren’t they? So you think of them in different ways. There are things of mine I’m sorry haven’t come here.
  152. Because her voice is, it’s like the muscles and it develops all the time. That was the fantastic thing for us.
  153. At one point I couldn’t move or get out of bed or anything. I developed blood clots because I’d been completely inactive. Then they thought – because the pain was so much – I had an infection in the bones, so they gave me pills, which gave me a tummy infection. It’s like a French farce.
  154. As a composer at a point where I can absolutely pick and choose what I want to do, I don’t want to write about anybody I don’t care about.
  155. And it sort of jogged a memory of something that I read at school and I read it, and I thought God this is it. So you never can tell. I could find something this afternoon.
  156. All I’ve ever tried to do is get the best out of people and to bring a bit of humour into it. Unlike, say, ‘The X-Factor,’ which may be great TV, but has no humour at all.
  157. After I had prostate cancer, I had something which was misdiagnosed which led to a load of back operations.
  158. A couple of back operations didn’t cure anything, but instead, things got worse and worse and worse.
  159. ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ is the biggest thing I’ve ever done, bigger even than ‘Cats’ which, in itself, I never thought we’d top.
  160. ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ is about love. It’s as simple as that.
  161. ‘School of Rock’ is fun. Hopefully, I’ve fleshed it out with a few catchy songs and kept the spirit of the original movie.
  162. ‘Phantom of the Opera’ started in my little 100-seater converted church in Britain with a stage where we did what we did. But it was the score itself was what made it.
  163. Whether I’m on or off the field, I know the importance of getting enough sleep and starting the day with a wholesome breakfast like oatmeal made with milk and fruit.
  164. When I’m in the gym, I always try and pair a push and a pull motion. I’ll then follow that with a lot of shoulder stability work.
  165. When I grew up, my father taught us the value of hard work. He wanted us to enjoy ourselves, but he also wanted to know what it took to be successful. He coached a lot of our sports teams growing up. We weren’t very good, but we learned about hard work and enjoying life and your teammates.
  166. Watching soccer is my main hobby, really. I’m no tactician or coach, but I enjoy watching the free flow of it, the different styles, and the histories behind clubs. Like Barcelona vs. Madrid – it’s not just a soccer game; it’s a geopolitical struggle. There are great storylines and no commercials.
  167. To me, breakfast is my most important meal. It’s often the meal you play a game on. I make sure I have oatmeal, milk, and fruit. It’s the fuel you use to hopefully do your best, so eating right is a big part of being a professional athlete. I wish I paid more attention to it earlier in my life.
  168. There is a board game called Settlers of Catan. That is what I play. I am so embarrassed.
  169. The thing I like most about football is it’s a meritocracy.
  170. The sweetest thing we ever had was, like, animal crackers in the pantry. I think my parents sort of passively made sure that we didn’t have a lot of junk food at our disposal, and I think that helped me and all my siblings growing up with how to approach nutrition and eating right.
  171. The Nike Fuel Band is interesting – it measures your movements and how far you’ve walked and how hard you’ve worked that day. I prefer using when I travel. It’s a fun way to see how far I’ve walked – how many steps I’ve taken when I’m walking around different cities.
  172. My number one focus is and will always be football. I wanted to make sure that companies I partner with not only respect that, but also make sense and are quality products. I think Klipsch is synonymous with quality in the sound industry, so it was a natural partnership.
  173. My goal is to be the best quarterback I can be for the Colts, and hope that it’s good enough.
  174. My favorite memories were with my dad, throwing a football around when he came home from work. As long as kids are having fun, that’s the biggest deal at the end of the day.
  175. My acting chops are awful.
  176. Make working out the centre band of core and hips a priority during any training session. As a sportsman, it’s the key to any movement and the source of most of your power.
  177. LaRon Landry, a safety, is in incredible physical condition – really impressive. Also Anthony Castonzo, the left tackle – I’m very impressed with him. He really sets a great example for how to stay in shape – not only during the off-season but throughout the season, which can be a struggle because of the rhythm of the way things work.
  178. It’s usually my mom who gets on me about my facial hair. I can’t grow a good mustache, so I guess it’s just a neck beard. I just have trouble growing up there.
  179. It’s none of our business, the sexual preference of people. So, I hope if someone’s thinking about it, that if they do come out as gay and are a professional football player, and it makes them happy, and it makes their life easier, then I think they should do it.
  180. It’s hard not to follow other careers of NFL quarterbacks in the 24/7 news-at-your-fingertips society we live in.
  181. It was nice to finish up Stanford. I think I always felt that I would be there for four years and graduate, and definitely didn’t want to leave early. A degree was definitely a plus, and I was having a lot of fun in school. But after football, you know, I don’t know. I really did enjoy studying architecture; it was a blast.
  182. I’m teaming up with Quaker and PLAY 60 to encourage kids to eat right, stay active and do something outside for at least 60 minutes a day.
  183. I’m not afraid to say I’m competitive.
  184. I’m definitely a football fan, so I try to stay up with how teams are doing, and you end up getting a lot of buddies that play on certain teams. I wouldn’t say I watch too much of other quarterbacks.
  185. I’m a big sleep guy. I think my schedule sorta starts with sleep and making sure I get enough of it. I’m an eight-plus hours guy. I would love to sleep more. I definitely try to create a routine and not stray from that routine at all, but I will take advantage of having an off-morning. And I really have become a fan of the 20-minute catnap.
  186. I’m a big fan of historical fiction stuff. Historical battles – ‘Gladiators,’ ‘The Patriot.’
  187. I wouldn’t say you worry about your health when you run. I would say a quarterback as an obligation to protect yourself as a runner, whether it’s getting out of bounds, sliding or getting down, whatever it might be.
  188. I was lucky enough at Stanford to have Vic Fangio as the defensive coordinator for a year, and then Jason Tarver.
  189. I was always impressed by how much my dad went out in the yard and played with me and my siblings when we were kids. I’m sure he was tired coming back from work, since he traveled a lot. But he always took time out of his day to go out in the yard.
  190. I try to eat fruit and veggies and meat and all the different categories and have a well rounded diet.
  191. I think there’s a lot to be learned from your teammates and older guys around you. And there are many ways to lead. You don’t have to change your personality to be a leader.
  192. I think leadership is most effective when it’s your own personality. But I feel like it’s a natural progression as a quarterback, as well.
  193. I think it’s nice sometimes not to be plugged in 24/7 to email and the Internet and everything else. It’s nice to get away.
  194. I think in any situation, so much of effective leadership is when it comes from your own personality. And I feel very fortunate to be comfortable in the Colts locker room, where people can be who they are, and they don’t have to change it when they show up to work that day.
  195. I think chocolate in moderation is not bad for you, but I eat way too much. I tell myself I’m going to eat two squares, and then I end up eating half a big bar.
  196. I think a punt can be a big play in a game. If it’s anything like a real game, then you realize that a Pat McAfee punt that downs someone inside the 2-yard line can really swing a game. I’m all for punting in video games.
  197. I think I feel fortunate to have been very well educated in terms of strength and training while I was at school at Stanford, and I think our strength coaches here on the Colts do a great job. A big part of being able to withstand hits is making sure that you’ve got a good base.
  198. I stay away from straight bench; all the work I do is with dumbbells to protect my rotator cuffs. Then I’ll do a bunch of different pull moves like inverted rows before finishing with some simple internal or external rotations with a band to strengthen my shoulder.
  199. I remember playing a high school basketball game where I didn’t eat anything for breakfast. I ate, you know, like a PB and J and some chips for lunch and nothing before the game. I didn’t make it through the first quarter. I wish I hadn’t have learned that way, but it did leave a lasting impression.
  200. I realize that as the quarterback, you have to assume some sort of leadership role because you have to talk in the huddle on every play, and you’re essentially giving out orders to the team. But in my mind, I have to prove myself on the field before I can start asserting a leadership role.
  201. I realize I’m very fortunate to hopefully make a lot of money playing football. I don’t know if I want to abuse that privilege and make myself a larger figure than I am.
  202. I played one year of fantasy football in high school. You really get into it. It makes more fans of the NFL, and people love talking about it. They’ll come up to me and say, ‘Why did you throw an interception? You ruined my fantasy team!’ Or they’re happy because they got you for a bargain.
  203. I like to play football, read some books, study.
  204. I like being able to walk or ride my bike to restaurants and do different things.
  205. I just grow a terrible mustache, so I try to use my neckbeard as a substitute. And when I get lazy, I don’t shave that often.
  206. I have three younger siblings, so the four of us were outside all the time after school playing games, making up games. My sister made up a game called ‘roof ball.’ We’d play that constantly. She always beat me in it, and it made me very mad. But we were outside all the time.
  207. I have an irrational fear that something bad is going to happen to me when I’m drinking out of a water fountain. I have no idea why.
  208. I grew up in the suburbs, so I figured ‘Why not try downtown living?’ And, honestly, I love it. I’ve been very pleasantly surprised at how much downtown Indianapolis has to offer.
  209. I grew up in Europe, and soccer was the first organized game I played. When we moved back to the U.S. in the middle of 4th grade, I switched to American football and stopped playing competitively until college, when I played intramurals.
  210. I figure it’s a European thing to eat cheese and crackers before a meal – that’s my afternoon snack, or I do it before dinner.
  211. I drink a lot of Body Armor – it’s a sports drink. It offers great hydration, and it’s the best before/after drink for workouts. Orange mango is my favorite. Strawberry banana is a close second.
  212. I don’t like candy bars. I eat the big rectangular bars. You know – anything between 85 and 50 percent cocoa.
  213. I don’t know how old my phone is, but it was only $10. It is a nice subconscious way of not having the Internet at your fingertips… e-mail, Twitter or Facebook.
  214. I do like routines. Waking up the same time, go to bed the same time.
  215. I do know it’s great to have a support from a fan base of a team. Football is such a team game, such a team aspect to it… Good things happen, the praise is spread around; and bad things happen, usually it’s not just one person’s fault.
  216. I always appreciated my dad coming outside and playing with us – or my mom – and being a part of the game we were playing or refereeing it or just being outside. That was fun for us, and it was very encouraging.
  217. Houston is my team, always and forever. But with the new TV packages, it’s so easy to watch every league in the world, and my overseas fandom is driven by the American guys. If Sunderland’s on TV, I’ll watch Jozy Altidore. I try to watch Geoff Cameron at Stoke. When Clint Dempsey was at Tottenham, I watched a lot of his games.
  218. He’s been so successful, arguably the best quarterback ever to play the game. If you were trying to follow his footsteps, it would be incredibly difficult. I’d go crazy if I woke up every day and tried to compare myself to Peyton Manning.
  219. Food really is fuel – and hydration as well – but for athletic activity, you really got to take it seriously, or else it can negatively impact your performance.
  220. Breakfast is so important, so I’ll make an omelet with cheese and deli meats, and then I’ll eat muesli and yogurt mixed with fruit or oatmeal with fruit – and then a side of baked beans.
  221. Biggest lesson I learned my first year in the NFL is no one gives a crap about what you did last week. This league is about what have you done for me now. That’s the NFL. It’s also our culture. So you keep working hard because that’s the biggest truth about football.
  222. After doing some research with my agent, we found out Klipsch was an official Colts partner, and they were based in Indianapolis, which only added to my esteem for the company. I also have a passion for design and technology that developed while I was at Stanford and appreciate the quality of Klipsch’s speakers and headphones.
  223. Why do we have financial crises? Why do banks lose money? If history is any guide, it hasn’t often been the result of speculative bets. It has been the result of banks making loans to individuals and businesses who can’t pay them back.
  224. Whether a president can truly improve, or damage, an economy remains an open question.
  225. When you can’t lend or trade – and you can’t invest with the leverage that juiced returns to support seven- and eight-figure bonuses – how exactly are you going to make money?
  226. What keeps me up at night? Waking up to a scoop at another newspaper or on TV. I’m probably competitive, almost too much so. I will stay up till the Web sites at night roll over. And if they don’t roll over, I’ll stay up until it’s done. I’ll wake up at the crack of dawn, or in the middle of the night even, just to go and check and see.
  227. What if the slowdown in merger activity isn’t cyclical, but secular? What if corporations have learned the lessons of so many companies before them that the odds of a successful merger are no better than 50-50 and probably less? Is it possible that the biggest deals have already been done?
  228. What if lawmakers never spoke to their constituents? Oddly enough, that’s exactly how corporate America operates. Shareholders vote for directors, but the directors rarely, if ever, communicate with them.
  229. We talk about institutions that are too big to fail – I think the story is as much about people who think they are too big to fail.
  230. Wall Street’s biggest fight with Obama was over the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, which Obama signed into law in the summer of 2010.
  231. Wall Street is littered with clever plans to use financial instruments to change behavior – carbon trading, for example. Some have changed the world, and others failed miserably.
  232. Unfortunately, I think it’s very difficult to separate policy from politics. In a perfect world, in some instances, you probably would want to. In other instances, you’d probably say that the political element is important because it should, in a perfect world, match what the stakeholders need or want, or what the public is after.
  233. Unemployment in Florida peaked at 11.2 percent in 2009, higher than the national average, and the state was a center for home foreclosures.
  234. Under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, a company is not allowed to provide a personal benefit to a decision maker in return for business. But hiring the sons and daughters of powerful executives and politicians is hardly just the province of banks doing business in China: it has been a time-tested practice here in the United States.
  235. Traditionally, we think that people with ideas are innovators – that Silicon Valley is the world of ideas. But within the hedge-fund world, they believe that they are men of ideas – that the trade is unto itself one of ideas.
  236. Tiptoeing on a tightrope past insider trading laws may be deft and clever, but it doesn’t make it right.
  237. There’s something called, ‘resolution authority,’ which gives the government the power to takeover a failing bank – something they didn’t have pre-Lehman Brothers.
  238. There’s a good argument to be made that companies that are private, where they’re run by partnerships, where everybody has true stake in them and they’re not playing with other people’s money, that by default it’s a safer system, because you really have skin in the game. You really own the company.
  239. There is a long list of psychology research demonstrating that appearances matter more than most us would care to admit. As shallow as it may be, better-looking people have been shown in various studies to have higher self-esteem and more charisma, are considered more trustworthy and are better negotiators.
  240. There are those on Wall Street and in the plutocracy who feel that Geithner is a hero who deftly steered the country from economic ruin. To many ordinary Americans, however, he is considered a Wall Street puppet and a servant of the so-called banksters.
  241. The rating agencies historically actually did a pretty good job rating regular bonds.
  242. The moment a large investor doesn’t believe a government will pay back its debt when it says it will, a crisis of confidence could develop. Investors have scant patience for the years of good governance – politically fraught fiscal restructuring, austerity and debt rescheduling – it takes to defuse a sovereign-debt crisis.
  243. The lesson of 2008 is that ultimately our markets are driven by confidence.
  244. The greatest economic power might in fact remain in the hands of the Federal Reserve. Economists credit the Fed’s policy of keeping interest rates at historic lows with helping to pump up the economy and bring unemployment down.
  245. The genre of narrative business books that I love so much – the ones that have a you-are-there quality – was invented, or so it is said, in 1982 by David McClintick, who wrote ‘Indecent Exposure,’ a rollicking good read about a Hollywood scandal and the ultimate boardroom power struggle at Columbia Pictures.
  246. The failure of Lehman may have allowed the government to do more to prop up the economy than it otherwise could.
  247. The euphoria around economic booms often obscures the possibility for a bust, which explains why leaders typically miss the warning signs.
  248. The ethos on Wall Street has not changed, and that’s not going to come from the corner office. That’s going to come, for better or worse, from Washington, and the whole idea of greed is still good, that is still pervasive.
  249. The economic meltdown that would define every aspect of Obama’s economy came to a head well before he became president, of course, and so did the legislation that would be the basis for everything that came after.
  250. The blowback against a bailout of Lehman would have been fierce. It is often forgotten, but the prevailing wisdom the day after Lehman fell was that its collapse was a good thing.
  251. The Saft America plant, a giant 235,000-square-foot mass of concrete, is a modern marvel: its roof covered in row upon row of solar panels, embodying the renewable future that the batteries manufactured within are meant to sustain.
  252. TARP became so politicized that having money from it was almost like a scarlet letter. There were debates over compensation, worry that the rules were going to get changed. All the banks were desperately rushing to get that money back as soon as possible – in part, so they could pay themselves bonuses without any government restrictions.
  253. Some billionaires like cars, yachts and private jets. Others like newspapers.
  254. Since JPMorgan Chase announced its surprise $2 billion-and-growing trading loss, there have been renewed calls from economists, pundits, and politicians to reinstate the Glass-Steagall Act, a Depression-era law that prevented commercial banks from participating in investment banking activities.
  255. Several companies have explicit policies against cronyism, with good reason. Hiring a family member simply for a relationship can be troubling and may not necessarily serve a company’s interests. But by and large, financial firms in particular commonly hire people who have certain connections, whether through family or a business relationship.
  256. Perhaps the biggest economic shift during Obama’s presidency came from a piece of legislation that wasn’t sold as such. On March 21, 2010, Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. It was Obama’s boldest piece of legislation and the one that will most likely define him.
  257. One of Obama’s first major acts as president was to sign the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and some of the money in that bill went to Saft.
  258. On TV at night, I DVR lots of programs – I use it more like a magazine rack flipping through shows than actually watching them in full. ‘Charlie Rose,’ ‘Meet the Press,’ ’60 Minutes’ are musts for me. I also DVR ‘NBC’s Nightly News’ and ‘The Chris Matthews Show’ on Sunday.
  259. No one suggested Lehman deserved to be saved. But the argument has been made that the crisis might have been less severe if it had been saved, because Lehman’s failure created remarkable uncertainty in the market as investors became confused about the role of the government and whether it was picking winners and losers.
  260. My training really was at the ‘New York Times,’ you know. When I got there, I was literally supposed to stay there for five weeks, and I got lucky like nobody, you know, like nobody’s business.
  261. More and more smaller entities, such as Politico or TechCrunch, have been able to come out of nowhere and own entities. Dealbook, like them, now has an even greater opportunity, through additional resources, to drill down and offer even more breaking news and deep analysis of the issues that matter to our audience.
  262. Let’s start with a basic question: Do we, as a country, want our most highly qualified employees from the private sector to pursue public service? The answer, I would imagine, should be yes.
  263. It’s the people who have an incentive to find the problem who usually find the problem.
  264. Investors are sometimes too busy looking for profits to notice where the truth ends and the deception begins.
  265. In truth, the best Bitcoin can hope for is to be a second-rate version of gold, if that.
  266. In truth, in the fairy-tale version of bailing out Lehman, the next domino, A.I.G., would have fallen even harder. If the politics of bailing out Lehman were bad, the politics of bailing out A.I.G. would have been worse. And the systemic risk that a failure of A.I.G. posed was orders of magnitude greater than Lehman’s collapse.
  267. In truth, a leader should either apologize, mean it and do something about it – or not apologize at all.
  268. In truth, Wall Street is in for a radical makeover. Fewer people, lower margins, lower risk, lower compensation – and ultimately, fewer talented people. It is likely to change the culture of an industry that for nearly a century has been the money center of the world.
  269. In the age of activism that is clearly not going away, it would seem that some form of engagement from directors with shareholders – rather than directors simply taking their cues from management – would go a long way toward helping boards work on behalf of all shareholders rather just the most vocal.
  270. In many ways, education is a lousy business. Teachers are not normal economic actors; almost all of them work for less money than they might fetch in some other industry, given their skills and advanced degrees.
  271. In September 2008 – as Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy and AIG, the world’s biggest insurance company, accepted a federal bailout – Senator John McCain of Arizona, in what was widely viewed as a political move, suspended his presidential campaign and called on Obama to rush back to Washington for a bipartisan meeting at the White House.
  272. If I have a spare second, I usually catch up on the many magazines I’m behind on or watch the latest movies on demand that I usually missed at the theater. I love magazines. My top three: Graydon Carter’s ‘Vanity Fair’, Adam Moss’ ‘New York magazine’ and David Remnick’s ‘New Yorker.’
  273. If I could only follow one person on Twitter, it would be Heidi Moore. She’s a financial journalist at NPR’s Marketplace.
  274. I’m probably a believer in abandoning too-big-to-fail firms or breaking them up in some way so that the system can try to take care of itself. I imagine you’re not going to get there, and therefore, I suspect regulation is what’s going to be required.
  275. I’m not a real sports guy, but I check ESPN.com just so I know what people are talking about.
  276. I would say that my whole career is effectively trying to be a storyteller within the context of financial news.
  277. I was always one of those people who would watch the Super Bowl as much for the sports as I did for the ads. I was always just sort of fascinated by the fact that when you turn on the TV, there was motion, there was moving pictures on it.
  278. I think, with Hank Paulson, the concept of a bailout was anathema to him from day one. He was a Republican; he’s a free marketeer. He believes in capitalism, and part of capitalism is believing in failure. And so the idea of bailing out an institution, I think, went against every part of him.
  279. I think you tell the story that has to be told. You tell the story that’s the truth. You tell the story that readers will be interested in and should know about.
  280. I think Ben Bernanke and Tim Geithner shared the view that they shouldn’t be in the business of bailouts, but you know, you’re not in the business of bailouts until you frankly think you need to be.
  281. I started, actually, in journalism when I was – well. I started at the ‘New York Times’ when I was 18 years old, actually, but really got into journalism when I was 15 years old and had started a sports magazine which was trying to become a national sports magazine.
  282. I have always looked at the world through the prism of money to some degree. If you could follow the money, it explains a lot of things, in all sorts of aspects of the world. You can look at politics through the prism of money. You can look at art through the prism of money. You can look at sports through the prism of money.
  283. I got my start in the ‘New York Times’ because I used to read Stuart Elliot, the advertising columns. I still do. And I read him so religiously, I wanted to work for him before I died.
  284. I don’t want to put words in Geithner’s mouth, but I think he is generally against the revolving door of government officials taking jobs with companies that they have overseen or in roles that involve lobbying. At minimum, I’m pretty sure he felt that way about himself.
  285. I don’t sleep well. I’m a very nervous – by my nature – anxious, almost paranoid person and reporter.
  286. Here’s the perversity of Wall Street’s psychology: The more Wall Street is convinced that Washington will act rationally and raise the debt ceiling, most likely at the 11th hour, the less pressure there will be on lawmakers to reach an agreement. That will make it more likely a deal isn’t reached.
  287. Hard paywalls will never work because, just like at a newsstand, the reader likes to browse the cover and a few articles before choosing to buy. Even if the material is truly unique, a consumer likes to try a little before buying.
  288. Hank Paulson, obviously, had spent his career on Wall Street, had a deep knowledge of the Street, and also was a very forceful personality, had a very good relationship with the president, and was in a very different place, for example, than Ben Bernanke, who is an academic, quiet guy: spent most of his time thinking about monetary policy.
  289. Great stories are still just great yarns. News remains the best human drama ever. Technology is not changing the story; it is just changing the way in which we deliver it.
  290. Forget about banks that are too big to fail; the focus should be on cities, municipalities and countries that are too big to fail.
  291. Debt, we’ve learned, is the match that lights the fire of every crisis. Every crisis has its own set of villains – pick your favorite: bankers, regulators, central bankers, politicians, overzealous consumers, credit rating agencies – but all require one similar ingredient to create a true crisis: too much leverage.
  292. Corporate tax reform is nice in theory but tough in practice. It most likely requires lower tax rates and the closing of loopholes, which many companies are sure to fight. And whatever new, lower tax rate is determined, there will probably be another country willing to lower its rate further, creating a sad race to zero.
  293. By now, it seems as if everyone has already read Thomas L. Friedman’s ‘The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century.’ It changed the way we think about global business, competitiveness and the implication for far-flung economies, governments, education and more.
  294. Bringing back something akin to Glass-Steagall would clearly help limit risk in the system. And that’s a very good and worthy goal. Letting banks sell securities and insurance products and services allowed them to grow too big too fast and fueled a culture that put profit and pay over prudence.
  295. Bitcoin, in the short or even long term, may turn out be a good investment in the same way that anything that is rare can be considered valuable. Like baseball cards. Or a Picasso.
  296. Before the web and these highly focused entities, journalists got to decide what was important to tell their audience and educated their readers. Now, journalists have to try and understand what their consumer actually wants to read and what angle they are looking for in order to keep audiences engaged in a highly competitive world.
  297. As a journalist, a big part of what you do is search for drama and conflict. And a lot of the backstory with ‘Billions’ is grounded in my journalistic background.
  298. As a child, I always enjoyed – my parents used to have these little cocktail parties – and I always loved trying to get the adults to tell me things they weren’t supposed to say. And in many ways, that’s what my job is today; it’s getting people to tell me things that they probably are otherwise not supposed to say.
  299. You’ve got to experiment to figure out what works.
  300. You can’t afford to get sick, and you can’t depend on the present health care system to keep you well. It’s up to you to protect and maintain your body’s innate capacity for health and healing by making the right choices in how you live.
  301. While sleep is clearly vital to emotional well-being, what is it, exactly, about sleep that is so necessary? As it turns out, mood disorders are strongly linked to abnormal patterns of dreaming.
  302. Whenever I write about mental health and integrative therapies, I am accused of being prejudiced against pharmaceuticals. So let me be clear – integrative medicine is the judicious application of both conventional and evidence-based natural therapies.
  303. When people are told to ‘eat many small meals,’ what they may actually hear is ‘eat all the time,’ making them likely to respond with some degree of compulsive overeating. It’s no coincidence, I think, that obesity rates began rising rapidly in the 1980s more or less in tandem with this widespread endorsement of more frequent meals.
  304. We’re all affected by music. It has the power to inspire, uplift us, change our moods, and even alter consciousness.
  305. We need to accept the seemingly obvious fact that a toxic environment can make people sick and that no amount of medical intervention can protect us. The health care community must become a powerful political lobby for environmental policy and legislation.
  306. We have known for many years that we need vitamin D to facilitate calcium absorption and promote bone mineralization.
  307. To be clear, I worry as much about the impact of the Internet as anyone else. I worry about shortening attention spans, the physical cost of sedentary ‘surfing’ and the potential for coarsening discourse as millions of web pages compete for attention by appealing to our base instincts.
  308. There’s a great deal of scientific evidence that social connectedness is a very strong protector of emotional well-being, and I think there’s no question that social isolation has greatly increased in our culture in, say, the past 50 years, past 100 years.
  309. The world is beset by many problems, but in my opinion, this hijacking of our brain’s reward centers by electronic media is potentially one of the most destructive.
  310. The ways that my dogs can make me – and my visitors – happy constantly amazes me.
  311. The usual justification for eating extra meals is that it keeps the metabolism ‘revved up’ so that weight loss is easier. There is, however, very little hard evidence that supports this idea, and a fair amount that disputes it.
  312. The most common objection that I hear to walking as exercise is that it’s too easy, that only sweaty, strenuous activity offers real benefits. But there is abundant evidence that regular, brisk walking is associated with better health, including lower blood pressure, better moods and improved cholesterol ratios.
  313. The more people have, the less content they seem to be. In America, the cultural expectation that we’re to be happy all the time and our children are to be happy all the time is toxic, and I think that really gets in the way of emotional well-being.
  314. The more easily digestible and refined the carbohydrates, the greater the effect on our health, weight and well-being.
  315. The bottom line is that the human body is complex and subtle, and oversimplifying – as common sense sometimes impels us to do – can be hazardous to your health.
  316. The best way to detoxify is to stop putting toxic things into the body and depend upon it’s own mechanisms.
  317. The World Health Organization has recognized acupuncture as effective in treating mild to moderate depression.
  318. Technology has a shadow side. It accounts for real progress in medicine, but has also hurt it in many ways, making it more impersonal, expensive and dangerous. The false belief that a safety net of sophisticated drugs and machines stretches below us, permitting risky or lazy lifestyle choices, has undermined our spirit of self-reliance.
  319. Studies have shown that people who are physically active sleep better than those who are sedentary. The more energy you expend during the day, the sleepier you will feel at bedtime.
  320. Shorter daylight hours can affect sleep, productivity and state of mind. Light therapy, also known as phototherapy, may help. It uses light boxes emitting full-spectrum light to simulate sunlight.
  321. Short naps are good. Given modern workplace demands, this is not possible for many people – but if you have the option, try napping for ten to twenty minutes in the afternoon, preferably lying down in a darkened room.
  322. Routines may include taking a warm bath or a relaxing walk in the evening, or practicing meditation/relaxation exercises. Psychologically, the completion of such a practice tells your mind and body that the day’s work is over and you are free to relax and sleep.
  323. Remember that breath walking – as with any meditation technique – should not be pursued with a grim determination to ‘get it right.’ The point is to cultivate openness, relaxation and awareness, which can include awareness of your undisciplined, wandering mind.
  324. Pay attention to your body. The point is everybody is different. You have to figure out what works for you.
  325. One of the most obvious ways dogs can improve our physical and mental health is via daily walks.
  326. My passion for gardening may strike some as selfish, or merely an act of resignation in the face of overwhelming problems that beset the world. It is neither. I have found that each garden is just what Voltaire proposed in Candide: a microcosm of a just and beautiful society.
  327. Most American diets, even bad ones, provide more than enough calcium for bone health, especially for men.
  328. Millions of Americans today are taking dietary supplements, practicing yoga and integrating other natural therapies into their lives. These are all preventive measures that will keep them out of the doctor’s office and drive down the costs of treating serious problems like heart disease and diabetes.
  329. Meditation while walking has a long, noble history in ancient spiritual disciplines.
  330. Massage therapy has been shown to relieve depression, especially in people who have chronic fatigue syndrome; other studies also suggest benefit for other populations.
  331. Many exercise forms – aerobic, yoga, weights, walking and more – have been shown to benefit mood.
  332. Low levels of vitamin D in the population as a whole suggest that most people need to take a vitamin D supplement. This may be especially true for seniors, as the ability to synthesize vitamin D in the skin declines with age.
  333. Limit or eliminate late-night computer and television viewing. A computer or TV screen may seem much dimmer than a light bulb, but these screens often fill your field of vision, mimicking the effects of a room filled with light.
  334. It’s rare – too rare, I have to say – for botanists to become doctors.
  335. It is more important to eat some carbohydrates at breakfast, because the brain needs fuel right away, and carbohydrate is the best source.
  336. It does kids no favors, and sets them up for a potential lifetime of poor health and social embarrassment, to excuse them from family meals of real food. Everyone benefits from healthy eating, but it is particularly crucial at the beginning of life.
  337. Insurance companies, whether private or government owned, must be compelled to pay for health-promoting measures. In turn, this will encourage physicians to offer such treatments in earnest.
  338. In the world at large, people are rewarded or punished in ways that are often utterly random. In the garden, cause and effect, labor and reward, are re-coupled. Gardening makes sense in a senseless world. By extension, then, the more gardens in the world, the more justice, the more sense is created.
  339. In my view, the best gift is one that benefits both the receiver and the planet.
  340. If you have difficulty sleeping or are not getting enough sleep or sleep of good quality, you need to learn the basics of sleep hygiene, make appropriate changes, and possibly consult a sleep expert.
  341. If we can make the correct diagnosis, the healing can begin. If we can’t, both our personal health and our economy are doomed.
  342. If the only way you could read an email was to run a mile first, the urge would quickly die. Human beings constantly do subconscious effort/reward calculations. Tapping a screen is the easiest of physical tasks.
  343. I’m still not comfortable recommending that people eat saturated fat with abandon, but it’s clear to me that sugar, flour and oxidized seed oils create inflammatory effects in the body that almost certainly bear most of the responsibility for elevating heart disease risk.
  344. I’m not against high-tech medicine. It has a secure place in the diagnosis and treatment of serious disease.
  345. I have argued for years that we do not have a health care system in America. We have a disease-management system – one that depends on ruinously expensive drugs and surgeries that treat health conditions after they manifest rather than giving our citizens simple diet, lifestyle and therapeutic tools to keep them healthy.
  346. I fully support a national health care program for the U.S.
  347. I am not against all forms of high-tech medicine. Drugs and surgeries have a secure place in the treatment of serious health conditions. But modern American medicine treats almost every health condition as if it were an emergency.
  348. I am a particular fan of integrative exercise – that is, exercise that occurs in the course of doing some productive activity such as gardening, bicycling to work, doing home improvement projects and so on.
  349. Human bodies are designed for regular physical activity. The sedentary nature of much of modern life probably plays a significant role in the epidemic incidence of depression today. Many studies show that depressed patients who stick to a regimen of aerobic exercise improve as much as those treated with medication.
  350. Human beings have survived for millennia because most of us make good decisions about our health most of the time.
  351. Human beings and plants have co-evolved for millions of years, so it makes perfect sense that our complex bodies would be adapted to absorb needed, beneficial compounds from complex plants and ignore the rest.
  352. Giving gifts to others is a fundamental activity, as old as humanity itself. Yet in the modern, complex world, the particulars of gift-giving can be extraordinarily challenging.
  353. Get people back into the kitchen and combat the trend toward processed food and fast food.
  354. Genuine happiness comes from within, and often it comes in spontaneous feelings of joy.
  355. Gardening is not trivial. If you believe that it is, closely examine why you feel that way. You may discover that this attitude has been forced upon you by mass media and the crass culture it creates and maintains. The fact is, gardening is just the opposite – it is, or should be, a central, basic expression of human life.
  356. For many in the modern world, carving out time for both traditional seated meditation and exercise has become close to impossible.
  357. Fitting a walk into a busy life can be challenging, so I suggest walking rather driving to work or to run errands as often as you can – in other words, think of walking as alternative transportation.
  358. Fear and greed are potent motivators. When both of these forces push in the same direction, virtually no human being can resist.
  359. Excess exercise tends to be counterbalanced by excess hunger, exemplified by the phrase ‘working up an appetite.’ A few people with extraordinary willpower can resist such hunger day after day, but for the vast majority, weight loss through exercise is a flawed option.
  360. Everyone prefers some foods over others, but some adults take this tendency to an extreme. These people tend to prefer the kinds of bland food they may have enjoyed as children – such as plain or buttered pasta, macaroni and cheese, cheese pizza, French fries and grilled cheese sandwiches – and to restrict their eating to just a few dishes.
  361. Even low-calorie diets and vigorous exercise fail to work in the long term for at least some people.
  362. Each day as I travel through downtown Tucson, I am amazed at how quickly the most ancient of human behaviors have changed. For as long as there have been Homo sapiens – roughly 200,000 years – people have filled their lives principally with two activities: talking directly with other people, and doing physical things.
  363. Dreaming is a phenomenon of purely individual consciousness, and consequently impossible to thoroughly deconstruct by a community of researchers. But dreaming matters.
  364. Dietary fat, whether saturated or not, is not a cause of obesity, heart disease or any other chronic disease of civilization.
  365. Conscious breath control is a useful tool for achieving a relaxed, clear state of mind.
  366. Clearly, America’s dysfunctional food culture must bear some of the blame for our excess pounds, but it’s likely our walking-averse lifestyles contribute as well.
  367. Citizens must pressure the American Hospital Association, the American Public Health Association, the Centers for Disease Control and other relevant governmental agencies to make greening our hospitals and medical centers a top priority so that they themselves don’t create even more illness.
  368. By keeping my hand in that, it’s the way I keep learning. The main way you learn in medicine is by practicing and working with patients.
  369. As any doctor can tell you, the most crucial step toward healing is having the right diagnosis. If the disease is precisely identified, a good resolution is far more likely. Conversely, a bad diagnosis usually means a bad outcome, no matter how skilled the physician.
  370. As an undergraduate at Harvard in the 1960s, I was fascinated by my visits to psychologist B.F. Skinner’s laboratory.
  371. As an American, you have a right to good health care that is effective, accessible, and affordable, that serves you from infancy through old age, that allows you to go to practitioners and facilities of your choosing, and that offers a broad range of therapeutic options.
  372. Anyone who knows me will attest that at any time during the day, you are most likely to find me picking tayberries, ‘deadheading’ peppermint, or succession-planting shallots. There is almost nothing, really, that I would rather do.
  373. American businesses are struggling to pay outrageous, exploitive insurance bills for their employees, hampering our ability to compete globally.
  374. A beautiful bouquet or a long-lasting flowering plant is a traditional gift for women, but I have recommended that both men and women keep fresh flowers in the home for their beauty, fragrance, and the lift they give our spirits.
  375. Well, some mathematics problems look simple, and you try them for a year or so, and then you try them for a hundred years, and it turns out that they’re extremely hard to solve.
  376. We’ve lost something that’s been with us for so long, and something that drew a lot of us into mathematics. But perhaps that’s always the way with math problems, and we just have to find new ones to capture our attention.
  377. There’s also a sense of freedom. I was so obsessed by this problem that I was thinking about if all the time – when I woke up in the morning, when I went to sleep at night, and that went on for eight years.
  378. There are proofs that date back to the Greeks that are still valid today.
  379. Then when I reached college I realized that many people had thought about the problem during the 18th and 19th centuries and so I studied those methods.
  380. The only way I could relax was when I was with my children.
  381. The greatest problem for mathematicians now is probably the Riemann Hypothesis.
  382. The definition of a good mathematical problem is the mathematics it generates rather than the problem itself.
  383. That particular odyssey is now over. My mind is now at rest.
  384. Some mathematics problems look simple, and you try them for a year or so, and then you try them for a hundred years, and it turns out that they’re extremely hard to solve. There’s no reason why these problems shouldn’t be easy, and yet they turn out to be extremely intricate.
  385. Pure mathematicians just love to try unsolved problems – they love a challenge.
  386. Perhaps the methods I needed to complete the proof would not be invented for a hundred years. So even if I was on the right track, I could be living in the wrong century.
  387. Mathematicians aren’t satisfied because they know there are no solutions up to four million or four billion, they really want to know that there are no solutions up to infinity.
  388. Just because we can’t find a solution it doesn’t mean that there isn’t one.
  389. It’s fine to work on any problem, so long as it generates interesting mathematics along the way – even if you don’t solve it at the end of the day.
  390. It could be that the methods needed to take the next step may simply be beyond present day mathematics. Perhaps the methods I needed to complete the proof would not be invented for a hundred years.
  391. I’m sure that some of them will be very hard and I’ll have a sense of achievement again, but nothing will mean the same to me – there’s no other problem in mathematics that could hold me the way that this one did.
  392. I was so obsessed by this problem that I was thinking about it all the time – when I woke up in the morning, when I went to sleep at night – and that went on for eight years.
  393. I tried to fit it in with some previous broad conceptual understanding of some part of mathematics that would clarify the particular problem I was thinking about.
  394. I really believed that I was on the right track, but that did not mean that I would necessarily reach my goal.
  395. I realized that anything to do with Fermat’s Last Theorem generates too much interest.
  396. I loved doing problems in school. I’d take them home and make up new ones of my own. But the best problem I ever found, I found in my local public library. I was just browsing through the section of math books and I found this one book, which was all about one particular problem – Fermat’s Last Theorem.
  397. I know it’s a rare privilege, but if one can really tackle something in adult life that means that much to you, then it’s more rewarding than anything I can imagine.
  398. I hope that seeing the excitement of solving this problem will make young mathematicians realize that there are lots and lots of other problems in mathematics which are going to be just as challenging in the future.
  399. I had this rare privilege of being able to pursue in my adult life, what had been my childhood dream.
  400. I grew up in Cambridge in England, and my love of mathematics dates from those early childhood days.
  401. I don’t believe Fermat had a proof. I think he fooled himself into thinking he had a proof.
  402. However impenetrable it seems, if you don’t try it, then you can never do it.
  403. Fermat said he had a proof.
  404. But the best problem I ever found, I found in my local public library.
  405. Always try the problem that matters most to you.
  406. With it adult political audiences abandoned cinemas. In their place appeared a void. That previous political audience migrated to the seats in front of their TV.
  407. Why does there exist a global American entertainment industry, but there isn’t an equivalent coming from France or Italy? This is the case simply because the English language opens the whole world to the American cinema.
  408. When a film is created, it is created in a language, which is not only about words, but also the way that very language encodes our perception of the world, our understanding of it.
  409. We expected that people were just waiting for the collapse of the Soviet Union, or at least for its retreat, and they were going to be full of initiative in all areas of life – in culture, in economy and in politics.
  410. There is no filmmaking legislation because distributors are not interested in sharing their money with the film industry – for instance, by giving a percentage of ticket sales back to filmmakers.
  411. The difficulty with the present state of affairs is that there is no legislation on the sources of funding for the Polish film industry. There is no legislation concerning filmmaking. And, there is no legislation on television that would be beneficial to filmmaking.
  412. The difficulty of writing a good theatre play set in new reality was even greater given that the level of similitude to life that is allowed in a film would not work on the stage.
  413. Television theatre, as is implied in its name, should rely on adaptations of scripts written for the theatre.
  414. Suddenly, the screens were dominated by American entertainment to the extent of something like 95 percent. As a result, audiences turned away from the kinds of films that we used to make.
  415. Previously the same Polish audiences would have been pressured into seeing cinema made for adults, films made by us about those spheres of life that were significant for us and which should be significant for our society.
  416. One might have thought that the most significant change in the film industry that would come about with a transition from the communist economy to capitalism would fundamentally concern the sources of funding.
  417. On the one hand, young theatre directors were coming to television theatre, because they wanted to get closer to the cinema, despite having studied and worked for the theatre.
  418. On the one hand, we had great filmic spectacles that brought in big audiences, adults as well as primary and secondary school students. On the other hand, there were attempts to create contemporary Polish film.
  419. Nevertheless, in the theatre, and in the cinema, the contemporary reality of Poland has been represented only to a minuscule degree in the last 12 years.
  420. Language also encodes our past. We want to know who we are. To know who we are, we have to know who we used to be. Consequently, our literature, written in the past, anchors us in that past.
  421. It was progressively more difficult to find work in the theatre, as well.
  422. It turned out that the country was helpless in the face of a new reality.
  423. In the same period, Polish literature also underwent some significant changes. From social-political literature, which had a great tradition and strong motivation to be that way, Polish literature changed its focus to a psychological rather than a social one.
  424. In the forty years of the people’s republic, some of the worst historical traits were preserved in our people. These included even the common characteristics developed in the economic reality of the time of partitions in the 17th and 18th centuries.
  425. In the first years after the systemic transition, our screens showed American entertainment that had not been available before, or had been available only sporadically.
  426. In the first years after 1989, films were partly financed from the state’s budget as well as by public television. Still, except for a few special cases, most films are made this way.
  427. In Europe, there is no television filmmaking legislation that could assist film production because private broadcasters are not interested in supporting Polish film.
  428. However, that old mode of Polish filmmaking virtually disappeared.
  429. Films made in the spirit of the past continued to be made.
  430. Eventually, the state’s funding covered only the stages leading to presenting a film project to potential funding bodies. It was enough to produce a script, indicate casting and put together a budget to present it all, but nothing beyond that.
  431. Even better, there were established two separate committees deciding on state film funding.
  432. Cinemas gained new young audiences who wanted films made for them.
  433. At the same time, television theatre became more visibly active.
  434. As I said earlier, there are no writers who could create a literary vision of the new reality.
  435. Also a great part of Polish industry proved to have existed only to support the Soviet military industry, and it became superfluous and incapable of being transformed into anything else. We did not foresee that or the magnitude of these phenomena.
  436. A novelty in Polish filmmaking was that it was possible to find funds for a big production. However, at the same time, the state budget committed less and less money to filmmaking.
  437. You can’t deny a band whose fans will literally do anything to see them win the awards. We’re very appreciative to the fan base. That mutual feeling of appreciation is something that really helps.
  438. Whether I’m trying to or not, I have this inherent feeling that music is uplifting; it makes you feel victorious, and that makes you feel like you can take on the world.
  439. When I was a kid, it was so important to listen only to bands nobody had ever heard of. I missed out on so much interesting music because of my need to listen to a psychobilly band that only two people knew about… Because I thought I was cool.
  440. When I walk around on the street and someone comes up to me, I have just as many full-grown men with large beards in Slipknot shirts saying he likes my band as much as I do girls with bright pink hair.
  441. We’ve won both the best and worst band in so many major magazines – we just get written off so much, but we don’t care.
  442. We’re not trying to shock people with our image.
  443. We’re not here to make the ignorant people happy. We’re here to write our music for those people that are interested in good rock n’ roll music.
  444. We’re entertainers. We’re theatrical.
  445. We want people to know they shouldn’t feel like social pariahs just because they want to dress differently or listen to rock n’ roll.
  446. We truly believe with hard work, dedication and perseverance, we can become the best at what we do. No one wants to become mediocre.
  447. We never made attempts to say we were anybody’s role model or the be-all-end-all of what people should look up to. We have always just been very open about the fact that we have difficulties and we are messed-up people, just as our fans are.
  448. We made ‘Wretched and Divine,’ and as much as I love it, it’s a pretty sparkly record – it’s a record that could be done as a play because it’s very theatrical with no grit.
  449. We know that listening to Black Veil Brides, wearing Black Veil Bride shirts, or being in Black Veil Brides isn’t always the most popular thing in the world.
  450. To be honest, I’ve always been really interested in the role of the host, whether it’s our kind of Billy Crystal-style traditional awards show host or when you have someone like Louis C.K. or a more edgy stand-up comedian do their take on a hosting role.
  451. There’s no place for Depeche Mode and the Sisters of Mercy in the music I make with my band. If I was a fan, I wouldn’t want to hear that on a Black Veil Brides record. It was important for me and for the integrity of the band not to tarnish it.
  452. There was never a time when I wasn’t making guitars out of cardboard or dressing up like the Misfits.
  453. There is nothing more, I guess, cannibalistic than the metal or the hard rock scene, it seems.
  454. There is no reason why a guitar player makes the guitar-playing faces. It doesn’t help you play guitar. You’ve not improved your skills. It’s because you’re up onstage, and the natural inclination is to put on a show. The rock guy faces are just as much of a front or a show as us wearing crazy makeup. It’s just a different scale.
  455. The story of my life publicly has been told through ‘Alternative Press.’ Former employees, people who have worked there – my friend Ryan Downey, who wrote for ‘AP’ for a long time – I’ve been able to have really great articles written about me and talk openly about things in my life.
  456. The pen and the written word hold a great deal of power.
  457. The only real inspiration or muse that I have is just the life that I live.
  458. The older I got, I started to realize more it’s not necessarily that any of us are inherently bad or good; you just kind of carve your own way, and you are your experiences and your surroundings and what you grow up in.
  459. The older I get, the more interest I have in writing other kinds of music.
  460. The image of the band has always been something that’s evolved or changed with every record cycle that we’ve done. I think, in a lot of respects, that’s because we were so interested in having a visual representation for the music that we were making.
  461. The devotion of the BVB Army, with its very big online presence, is amazing. We’ve been fortunate from the very beginning. It was something that was really able to spur on our career.
  462. The Misfits skull was my second tattoo, and the Danzig was my third.
  463. That’s what makes me insufferable to be around, is that most of my life I have assumed that everyone wants to see me perform and do things all the time.
  464. Rock stars aren’t crapped out of the sky.
  465. Our shows have always been sort of an all-generations thing, people from 6 to 60.
  466. Our music is never going to stop someone from bullying someone else. But you should be your own person.
  467. One of the things that always disappointed me as a kid, growing up, was when you could tell the singer had a fancy for something different and turned the band into something else.
  468. On Warped Tour in Boise, Idaho, I broke my tooth on the mic. I took a pretty significant chunk out of my tooth and had to have it sanded down. It wasn’t the most painful injury, but it was the most unexpected one.
  469. Nobody is convinced that Johnny Depp goes to Walmart dressed as Sweeney Todd, but everyone expects us to.
  470. My whole life, I’ve loved ’80s synth and goth rock like The Sisters of Mercy and Depeche Mode.
  471. My job as the host of a rock awards show is not to be as divisive as possible, but certainly you want to be able to interject your jokes and how you feel about stuff.
  472. My biggest love has always been the music Black Veil Brides make, but that doesn’t mean I don’t listen to or enjoy other things.
  473. More than anything, I write about what I know. The experiences that I’ve had in my life and that we’ve all had collectively, that’s what we draw from.
  474. Lyrically, the most important thing for me is, how can I tell a cohesive story?
  475. Kiss will always be Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley to me.
  476. It’s really important for us as a band, that when someone is giving us grief on stage, to show our fans how important it is that they stand up for themselves and that they feel confident in themselves.
  477. It’s not easy to be the weird kid or the rebel.
  478. It seems like a gross waste of time to continue our career predicated on the idea that we’re going to divide opinion. What’s more important is just doing something that you love.
  479. In terms of stage presence for me, I’m influenced by a myriad of things. A lot of punk performers, people like Dave Vanian from The Damned and Davey Havok from AFI was a huge influence on me when I was younger.
  480. If you nominate us for something, we’re going to win.
  481. If what you’re writing is genuine, regardless of whether it sounds cliche or people wouldn’t necessarily think it’s the most brilliant metaphor in the world, it’s always important to be genuine with what you’re writing; at least, that’s how I feel.
  482. If they can look past the fact that I happen to wear mascara on stage – which, by the way, is a ridiculous thing that people have a stigma about – then we promise a good rock show.
  483. I’ve always been a big fan of utopian, future, new-world stories – ‘V For Vendetta,’ comic books, graphic novels.
  484. I’m real pleased and humbled by the support that the fans show.
  485. I’m not religious, but I understand the need for faith and hope.
  486. I’m not against making new fans, but I’m not going to go out of my way to pander to someone and try to make them like me; that’s not who we are. It’s not as if we’re fighting to find an audience – we have our audience, and anybody else is definitely welcome.
  487. I wouldn’t want to make the same record over and over again or look the same or be the same. I think that’s just human life in general, though.
  488. I will say one thing: Mick Mars is one of the greatest songwriters I’ve ever met in my life and had the pleasure to work with.
  489. I was this little kid writing songs. I look back at having that dream, and it’s weird. Being able to do it and live out your dream on any scale is amazing. I don’t take any of it for granted at all.
  490. I was homeless for almost a year and a half, just living in my car or bouncing around peoples’ houses, going to 7-Eleven at the end of the day and asking them for the taquitos that they were going to throw out because I hadn’t eaten in two days.
  491. I was a little chubby kid that no girls ever talked to. I had little chance of becoming an internationally known rock star. Music was my escape and my belief system.
  492. I think, on any given day, somebody could help out a homeless person and cuss out somebody that cut them off in traffic, and I think that everybody has that inside them: it’s just how you live that balance – so I think everybody is ‘Wretched and Divine.’
  493. I think Heaven and afterlife is for the living; it’s for the people that continue on and remember that person, and if you’ve done something that is substantial in your life then you can leave a legacy and do something positive.
  494. I see the merit in religion, and I see the need for faith and hope and sometimes people who are more snide look at people who are religious, particularly people in rock bands, and they’ll say, ‘Oh that’s dumb, you believe in whatever,’ but I think everybody believes in something.
  495. I never anticipated seeing 40.
  496. I like both antireligious and traditional Catholic imagery.
  497. I left high school very early. I was 17. So I guess it wasn’t that early, but I did not get a high school education.
  498. I know what it’s like to be an outcast in society. I know what it’s like to want to find strength, and more importantly, I know what it’s like to find that internal strength and rise out of the pain of being just sort of a weirdo.
  499. I knew that my love for the Sisters of Mercy, Lords of the New Church and that kind of stuff, was never going to lend itself well to a direct interpretation in Black Veil Brides.
  500. I just don’t really think about death.
  501. I have no goal to have artistic credibility.
  502. I have a super supportive family.
  503. I had Batman stuff all over my house growing up.
  504. I go to a lot of self-help groups in the day, and then I can sleep pretty well at night.
  505. I don’t want to paint myself as some villain – I was never a bad guy doing horrible things, but I got too caught up in wanting a very specific thing to happen to the band. Ultimately, I had to find the ability in myself to get over that and stop being so stringent and learn to laugh a little bit more.
  506. I don’t think I necessarily am prepared to write about anybody else’s life but mine.
  507. I don’t really have any interest in allowing other people’s kind of idiotic, unnecessary, either bigotry or hatred or whatever derision they have for me, I don’t allow for it to really bother me, because I don’t need it.
  508. I don’t know what metalcore is. I know what rock n’ roll is… It’s not rocket science.
  509. I don’t do anything unless I think about it six months in advance.
  510. I came from a town of about 2,000 people with one stop light, and I was told that nothing I ever wanted to do, I would succeed in.
  511. I am a clinical zombie.
  512. How do we make a record that’s true to the vibe of the band but still maintain the pace of moving forward and doing something fresh?
  513. Growing up, I went to the Warped Tour a lot, and I got to see bands like Rancid and AFI and Dropkick Murphys and these bands that meant so much to me when I was a kid – all in succession on these stages, so to get to play that same stage that I watched those bands play is a huge thing for me.
  514. For us, we are interested in doing what’s cool for us and what’s cool for the audience. That’s it.
  515. For us, all we care about is maintaining what we do as a band.
  516. For someone like me, music is all I’ve ever thought about – playing big shows, and then, when you take something that is based around your music and put it in a completely different medium, it’s a really interesting and cool emotion to watch.
  517. Every Christmas, all I ever wanted was Playskool instruments. It was my entire life. And then by the time I was 6 or 7 years old, it became, ‘Now I’m going to force my entire family to watch me perform all these rock songs.’
  518. Even if you don’t like what I do, and you don’t like my band, you might have a fan that likes both of us, and why would you wanna alienate them?
  519. Coming out of ‘Wretched and Divine,’ I was still wanting to explore the more theatrical elements of songwriting. That led to Andy Black.
  520. Being able to be one of the headline bands on Warped Tour was a dream I had since I was in middle school.
  521. Being a singer, I can easily break facial extremities, but breaking my nose in Luxembourg was extremely painful.
  522. As you get older, you realize you’re not that cool. You also realize the people you called posers are just people like you.
  523. As far as being onstage, commanding presence, I’ve always looked up to people like Axl Rose and Freddie Mercury and Paul Stanley – the rock gods. I’ve always wanted to be able to achieve that level of commanding nature onstage and really leading people at a show.
  524. Always be yourself and rebel against what people tell you should be and be whatever you want to.
  525. All I ever wanted to do was be in a band.
  526. A band like Avenged Sevenfold I’ve praised quite a bit publicly, because it’s a band that has moved into that arena-size thing for a hard rock band.
  527. You know, we’ve got so much on Bravo and coming up on Bravo, and I think we have so much more going on than ‘The Real Housewives.’ And I think ‘The Real Housewives’ is a great, you know, great addition to the portfolio. I think it brings a lot of viewers under our umbrella. And I think they stay and sample other shows.
  528. You know, ‘Project Runway’ was a really special show, and we had a great five seasons with it. We loved that show, and we loved the stories that it brought to Bravo and the creativity. And it was a magic five seasons.
  529. When I was working at Trio, I was pitched ‘Queer Eye for the Straight Guy’ and I knew, whoever gets this, this is a game changer. When I started at Bravo in 2005, it was a hit, and Season 1 of ‘Project Runway’ was in postproduction.
  530. When I was a 21-year-old intern at CBS, I was told I had crossed eyes and shouldn’t try to be on air. That’s when I decided I was going to be behind the scenes.
  531. Ultimately, it’s not my job to judge the ‘Housewives’ – we don’t editorialize on the show; we really leave it to the audience. We have a certain wink, which is the Bravo wink. We may linger on a shot or we may let something play out longer, but we leave it to you.
  532. There’s nothing I don’t love about ‘Mad Men.’
  533. The thing that’s fun about the ‘Housewives’ is talking to your friends about it.
  534. The one guiding principle over my 23-year career in TV has been as long as I’m having fun, I really don’t care what the job title is.
  535. The book is called ‘Most Talkative,’ because I was voted most talkative in high school. And I’ve never stopped talking. My mouth has been my greatest asset and my biggest Achilles’ heel.
  536. The Internet is for haters. Everyone wants to knock somebody down, but it’s cool.
  537. TV was my hobby. I loved the glitz. I loved how hot everybody was.
  538. Susan Lucci was the biggest star in the daytime galaxy, and she served it up hot and fresh and chic five days a week. Before there was Joan Collins’s Alexis Morrell Carrington Colby Dexter Rowan on ‘Dynasty,’ there was Erica Kane Martin Brent Cudahy Chandler Montgomery Montgomery Chandler Marick Marick Montgomery on ‘All My Children.’
  539. St. Louis has a lot of weird food customs that you don’t see other places – and a lot of great ethnic neighborhoods. There’s a German neighborhood. A great old school Italian neighborhood, with toasted ravioli, which seems to be a St. Louis tradition. And they love provolone cheese in St. Louis.
  540. Sometimes I get frustrated in traffic. I typically start going deep with my cab driver and Twitter feed – simultaneously – to take my mind off the gridlock. I enjoy live-tweeting my cab rides.
  541. McDonalds used to be my favorite place to eat, until my metabolism changed in my late 30s. Before that, I would have no hesitation about walking into McDonalds and getting two cheeseburgers and fries and enjoying every last bite.
  542. Like when I host a party. I hope my guests get along. But if not, how interesting!
  543. Jenny McCarthy was the one I thought could turn me straight. I thought that if I could just get my shot with her, it could happen.
  544. It’s so mental how I looked in the ’90s. The fact that I thought my ponytail was a good thing – it was just terrible. Cutting it off was so monumental.
  545. In the case of ‘The Housewives,’ I call the ‘Housewives’ sociology of the rich. I think it’s just fun to watch. It’s guilt-free gossiping that you can have. It’s like the modern-day soap opera, in my mind.
  546. If you look at the people who make up the Bravo landscape from Jeff Lewis to Rachel Zoe and Padma Lakshmi and Tabatha Coffey and the ‘Millionaire Matchmaker,’ these are very strong personalities that people love to watch and that you… don’t see anywhere else.
  547. If you look at my life before I went into television, the struggle I went through coming out would be surprising to most people, given how comfortable and how out I am being the only late-night gay talk-show host.
  548. I’ve really hung in there with my BlackBerry. The main reason I like it better than an iPhone is that I can type better. I saw Rachel Zoe using a white one and I was jealous. The risk, of course, is that it could look like a Lady BIC. I’ve just learned to own it though.
  549. I’ve been nominated for 12 Emmys, and we won – for ‘Top Chef’ – the only time I didn’t go.
  550. I’ve been gay since the day I was born.
  551. I’m happy to be everybody’s gay best friend.
  552. I’m big on being positive. I’m generally so positive and happy. I just always felt that I was exactly where I wanted to be. And things have continued to go in great directions.
  553. I’m an NRA-certified Expert Rifleman.
  554. I’m a lifetime St. Louis Cardinals fan.
  555. I’d like to think, that were he alive today, Warhol would be painting the Housewives.
  556. I would like a boyfriend. I’m a very happy person and it is the final, final piece of the puzzle. I’m looking for that shout-it-out-from-the-mountaintops, fall-in-love person.
  557. I work out at Will Space four times a week. It’s a private training gym. It’s owned by my trainer, Will Torres. I just came from there, actually. I turned Mark Consuelos onto Will, so he goes there too. Today we boxed. It’s every kind of cross-training you can do.
  558. I will be the 43-year-old guy in the jumpsuit. In my estimation and my image of myself is that I am 23 and can get away with it. If I didn’t have the show, I would be in one right now. It would be denim, but I love a terry.
  559. I wanted to tell a dream-come-true story about going from a closeted gay kid who loved pop culture to an out adult man making pop culture. I went from being told when I was 21 that I should never go on TV because of my crossed eyes to winding up being a ‘Housewives’ whisperer and talk-show host.
  560. I talk, watch TV, spout opinions, schmooze, negotiate, talk some more, play games, and have a little cocktail.
  561. I started working at Bravo in 2005, when I was offered a job by Lauren Zalaznick, the network’s chairman. She encouraged me to start a blog. I wrote behind-the-scenes gossip about ‘Battle of the Network Reality Stars,’ the first show I took on as head of current programming.
  562. I run from Horatio Street down just past Battery Park City and back. It’s amazing to run and see the Statue of Liberty and the ferries coming in. People think if you’re not near Central Park, there’s nowhere to go, but there’s a whole ecosystem happening down here.
  563. I read the ‘Times’ and ‘Post,’ but I have nothing against the ‘Daily News.’ I also fish around the Internet for entertainment news but find most of what I read to be untrue or partially true.
  564. I never say I work in television, I say I get to work in television.
  565. I love divas. Madonna, Mariah, Beyonce, Britney.
  566. I love a smart, well-written show, and ’30 Rock,’ well, you can’t get any better than that. Tina Fey poos funny. There’s nothing that she does that isn’t funny. That show is an example of how brilliant she is. It’s so smart. They’ve done some brilliant commentary about the ‘Housewives’ with ‘Queen of Jordan,’ their show-within-the-show.
  567. I love San Francisco so much. I call it the Emerald City and have been coming here since 1992. I have a few old friends that live here, and my aunt and uncle live in Oakland. I think it’s a magical city – it’s big, sexy and very ‘cosmo’ with a small-town feel.
  568. I love Jimmy Fallon; he’s always a great time.
  569. I love ‘Top Chef.’ I think it rewrote the book on how food shows are presented on TV.
  570. I haven’t fully moved over to the iPad. At any given time, I have about four DVDs in my pocket. I’m constantly screening ‘Top Chef,’ ‘Housewives,’ and all the other shows we have in development, racing to meet a deadline. So I pretty much bring my laptop everywhere.
  571. I have a Viking stove. The color is butter lemon, and I had to wait several months for it, because that color wasn’t available and I really wanted butter lemon! But I don’t know that it’s seriously ever been cooked on. I mean, I make tea every morning. Does that count?
  572. I fell in love with Erica Kane the summer before my freshman year of high school. Like all red-blooded teen American boys, I’d come home from water polo practice and eat a box of Entenmann’s Pop’Ems donut holes in front of the TV while obsessively fawning over ‘All My Children’ and Erica, her clothes, and her narcissistic attitude.
  573. I didn’t have a role model when I was younger.
  574. I am so proud of ‘Top Chef’ – I think it’s got great cred.
  575. I am a late discoverer of ‘Friday Night Lights.’ I cry every episode at least once. I love to cry – happy, emotional tears. I just love it.
  576. I always wanted to be an anchorman, but after college I wound up working behind the scenes at CBS News for 10 years.
  577. I always knew I wanted to be in front of the camera. But even after 10 years behind the scenes at CBS News producing live segments, celebrity profiles, and breaking news, I still hadn’t been given the chance to be on TV.
  578. I absolutely love low-key restaurants.
  579. Follow your passion. Be yourself, but check yourself before you wreck yourself.
  580. Fame does different things to different people. For some people it makes them a better person.
  581. Dinner ‘conversation’ at the Cohens’ meant my sister, mom, and I relaying in brutal detail the day’s events in a state of amplified hysteria, while my father listened to his own smooth jazz station in his head.
  582. Anybody who really knows about the TV business knows that it would be impossible to just march in one day and say to your colleagues and bosses, ‘Oh yes, I’m hosting my own show.’
  583. Amy Sedaris makes me laugh harder than anybody.
  584. You know when you’re young you think you will always be. As you become more fragile, you reflect and you realize how much comfort can come from the past. Hymns can carry you into the future.
  585. Things have changed so much. People walked away from a simple life we had in the ’20s and ’30s, and I am glad that I am able to touch that period in our lives with the shows that I do and with the music that I do.
  586. There was just something about me she did not like.
  587. The straight man has the best part. He gets to be in the show and see it, too.
  588. Mornin’ ladies, my goodness don’t you look happy. Must be cuttin’ somebody up pretty good.
  589. Lonesome Rhodes had wild mood swings. He’d be very happy, he’d be very said, he’d be very angry, very depressed, and I had to pull all of these emotions out of myself. And it wasn’t easy.
  590. If you think and feel what you’re supposed to think and feel, hard enough, it’ll come out through your eyes – and the camera will see it.
  591. I’m not really wise. But I can be cranky.
  592. I’m not as good a singer as I am an actor. So that’s why I – the stories I like so much is because I’ve been a story teller for a long time. I started as a singer and found out I didn’t have a very good voice. That’s the reason I went into acting.
  593. I was being laughed at. I hated it, so I made an adjustment to control the situation. All comics learn that.
  594. I was baptized alongside my mother when I was 8 years old. Since then, I have tried to walk a Christian life. And now that I’m getting older, I realized that I’m walking even closer with my God.
  595. I wanted to prove that I could play something else, but there were 249 episodes out there of ‘Mayberry,’ and it was aired every day. It was hard to escape.
  596. I still play that guitar. It’s a Martin D-18 with a clear pick guard. I’ve played that guitar on and off my TV shows for nearly 50 years.
  597. Any time I try to play anything that doesn’t come natural, I’m just plain bad.
  598. When a change in how some element of one’s business is conducted becomes an order of magnitude larger than what that business is accustomed to, then all bets are off.
  599. We are now living on Internet time. It’s a new territory, and the cyber equivalent of the Oklahoma land rush is on.
  600. There is at least one point in the history of any company when you have to change dramatically to rise to the next level of performance. Miss that moment – and you start to decline.
  601. There are so many people working so hard and achieving so little.
  602. The Internet doesn’t change everything. It doesn’t change supply and demand.
  603. Success breeds complacency. Complacency breeds failure. Only the paranoid survive.
  604. So give me a turbulent world as opposed to a quiet world and I’ll take the turbulent one.
  605. Privacy is one of the biggest problems in this new electronic age.
  606. Pickups, S.U.V.’s, vans and the like represent about 80 million vehicles, with mileage of perhaps 13 to 16 miles per gallon. Converting those should be our first priority.
  607. Only the paranoid survive.
  608. Not all problems have a technological answer, but when they do, that is the more lasting solution.
  609. Most Americans probably aren’t aware that there was a time in this country when tanks and cavalry were massed on Pennsylvania Avenue to chase away the unemployed.
  610. Leaders have to act more quickly today. The pressure comes much faster.
  611. Just as we could have rode into the sunset, along came the Internet, and it tripled the significance of the PC.
  612. It’s not enough to make time for your children. There are certain stages in their lives when you have to give them the time when they want it. You can’t run your family like a company. It doesn’t work.
  613. If the world operates as one big market, every employee will compete with every person anywhere in the world who is capable of doing the same job. There are lots of them and many of them are hungry.
  614. I’ve had a wonderful life. What people are going to write about me 10 years after I’m dead – who cares?
  615. I wasn’t cut out to be an opera singer, but it was a nice fantasy for a teenager growing up in Hungary during the Stalinist era.
  616. I was running an assembly line designed to build memory chips. I saw the microprocessor as a bloody nuisance.
  617. I was glad I liked chemistry.
  618. I really don’t have much respect for the people who live their lives motivated by an exit strategy existing, being performed. There was no option that we were trained in that says, ‘If it gets too hard, get up and leave.’
  619. I have been quoted saying that, in the future, all companies will be Internet companies. I still believe that. More than ever, really.
  620. I did not want to become a poster child for yet another disease.
  621. Growth is kinda built into everyone’s genes. It’s built into management’s genes, the salesman’s genes, the investors’ desires. People expect companies to grow.
  622. Congress will pass a law restricting public comment on the Internet to individuals who have spent a minimum of one hour actually accomplishing a specific task while on line.
  623. A career in journalism suddenly lost its appeal.
  624. You know, you can only throw in so many haymakers before one misses and you get knocked out.
  625. You know, I still love the innocent parts of the game. I love hitting tennis balls. I love seeing the young guys do well. I’ll still have a lot of friends to watch. I’ll miss the relationships probably the most. As time passes, I’ll probably miss the tennis more.
  626. You can get the true essence of New Yorkers by just hanging out in Central Park.
  627. You ask me a question, I’m going to give you an honest answer.
  628. When you come off something really disappointing, you want to come back and kind of regroup and get involved in something positive right away.
  629. When I was 18, 19, I was presented as the ‘aw shucks’ Nebraska kid who’s coming up with a big serve, and then I flipped out a couple of times, and then I was ueber-brat, when I feel like there’s parts of both, but I don’t think I am either one, if that makes sense.
  630. Well, immediately we announced yesterday or the day before we’re building, with my foundation, a youth tennis and learning center in Austin. I’d like to be hands on with that and not see it periodically.
  631. There have been great champions in every generation.
  632. The selfish thing about an athlete is you always look at the side of things where you say I could’ve done that better.
  633. Tennis is a full-time job and not just the two hours that people see when we’re on the court.
  634. Stay in school kids or you’ll end up being an umpire.
  635. Stay in college, kids. Otherwise, you may become an umpire.
  636. One little secret of the guys who have won one slam, is that we don’t want other guys to win one because its like a bit of a special fraternity.
  637. My worst days are still pretty good days. That’s something I might lose in the moment sometimes, but I have a pretty good grasp of it.
  638. My entire career, I’ve been a worker.
  639. My aggression out there is my weapon. I think it’s more letting them know that I’m not going to let them get away with something, and I’m not just going to kind of poke it back and be content to stay in rallies.
  640. Most players who play tennis love the game. But I think you also have to respect it. You want to do everything you can in your power to do your best. And for me, I know I get insane guilt if I go home at the end of the day and don’t feel I’ve done everything I can. If I know I could have done something better, I have this uneasy feeling.
  641. It’s not so much that I don’t like traveling, it’s just that I love being home. I love being able to spend time with my friends.
  642. In the States, tennis is sixth or seventh on the totem pole as far as sports go.
  643. If there were rankings for press conferences, I wouldn’t have to worry about dropping out of the top five, I hope.
  644. If I’m being honest, I think I’d be good at television; I just don’t know if I am interested, because you are kind of geographically responsible to a location, and frankly I don’t know if I retired from tennis so that I could sit around tennis tournaments 12 hours a day.
  645. I’ve pretty much been portrayed as every style thing you can be. After Wimbledon you are Andy Everyman, who everybody is rooting for. I think the meat and potatoes of who I am hasn’t been covered yet.
  646. I’ve got more out of tennis than I could ever give back.
  647. I’ve been pretty good about keeping my nose to the grindstone. I feel like I won a lot of matches from hard work and persistence, even maybe when I had better options as far as shot-making.
  648. I’ve always, for whatever my faults have been, felt like I’ve never done anything halfway.
  649. I’m the most successful bad player ever.
  650. I’m not going to go run and hide because I’m catching some heat. I’m not going to stay at home and pout.
  651. I’m convinced being a tennis analyst is the easiest job in the world.
  652. I’ll never lose my roots. I think I’m too close to my family for that. I still make my trip back to Nebraska every year, and I still love going back to Texas where I grew up, as well. I’ve just kind of had to mature a little bit more and get used to a little bit different style of life.
  653. I want everyone to look back and think that I was awesome.
  654. I used to hear a lot that all I could do was hit a serve, I couldn’t volley, I can’t hit a backhand, I don’t return well, and then people would turn round and tell me I’m underachieving.
  655. I used to go to the U.S. Open on my birthdays and sit in the nosebleeds.
  656. I think it’s foolish to think that if you’ve done something for so long, you can kind of delete it out of your memory bank or delete every emotion attached to it. I knew when I retired what that meant.
  657. I think if I believe in something strongly enough, I’m pretty outspoken about it.
  658. I think I’ve always had a decent perspective on wins and losses on the tennis court.
  659. I think I have a lot of room for improvement. My serve is okay, but I need to work on a lot of things: return, transition game, backhand.
  660. I played basketball in high school, and I love watching sports – I’ll watch everything except maybe hockey.
  661. I like playing tennis. I’ve always enjoyed the process of being a tennis player; I’m just not sure that I enjoyed the travel at the end, and my body didn’t recover from the day-to-day grind.
  662. I like grass, I enjoy it and it suits my game.
  663. I had a very detailed retirement plan, and I feel like I’ve met every aspect of it: a lot of golf, a lot of carbs, a lot of fried food, and some booze, occasionally – I’ve been completely committed… The results have shown.
  664. I got to play in a crowd, play in Wimbledon finals, be the guy on a Davis Cup team for a while. Those are opportunities not a lot of people get. As much as I was disappointed and frustrated at times, I’m not sure that I ever felt sorry for myself or begrudged anybody any of their success.
  665. I got to play in a crowd, play in Wimbledon finals, be the guy on a Davis Cup team for a while. Those are opportunities not a lot of people get.
  666. I enjoy hitting tennis balls. I haven’t lost any of the innocent parts of tennis. I just do it in front of less people.
  667. I don’t think anyone in their right mind takes me serious.
  668. I don’t think about tennis 24/7. I enjoy time on the lake at my Florida home and just being lazy on the sofa.
  669. I don’t really rate press conferences. It’s not as though I leave the room fist-pumping my way down the corridor after a good one.
  670. I don’t know that I’ve ever been someone who’s interested in existing on tour. I have a lot of interests and a lot of other things that excite me.
  671. I don’t know that I’ll ever be the guy who needs to go to a tournament to be seen and to spectate. I feel like I can accomplish spectating from home.
  672. I don’t have much interest in being on a senior tour. I don’t think I retired so that I could be on tour.
  673. I don’t care when people use the term ‘one-Slam wonder’ with me.
  674. I cook a little – I’ve never taken classes or anything – but enough to get by.
  675. Having two older brothers is a healthy reminder that you’re always closer to the bottom than you are to the top.
  676. Do you have to be like a second-grade dropout to be an umpire? Did you go to school until you were 8 years old? I think you quit school before you were 10. Stay in school kids or you’ll end up being an umpire.
  677. Call me All-American, but I love Ham and Cheese sandwiches. And not just any old ham and cheese sandwich… My mother’s is the best. I’ve tried many times to make these sandwiches on my own, but it’s never the same.
  678. At one point in your life, you’ll have the thing you want or the reasons why you don’t.
  679. You can get rich or famous by doing the same thing.
  680. You become the movie you are making.
  681. When there is a strong woman character in a story – that always grabs me.
  682. When something possesses me, I go ahead and do it.
  683. When I’m not working, I get very down, but when I am working, I get very immersed in it.
  684. When I started out, nobody gave me scripts, so I had to write.
  685. When I sent those scripts, that was the lowest point of my life. We’d just had our second son, and when I went to collect them from hospital, I went to the bank to try and get some money to buy some diapers, the screen showed I’ve got $26 left.
  686. When I see something I like, that’s all that counts. What they use, how they get there, I never bother them.
  687. When I have a full schedule like that, I don’t see myself sitting there for a couple of months, doing the research, going through a painful process, it’s just not my thing anymore.
  688. When I grew up, in Taiwan, the Korean War was seen as a good war, where America protected Asia. It was sort of an extension of World War II. And it was, of course, the peak of the Cold War. People in Taiwan were generally proAmerican. The Korean War made Japan. And then the Vietnam War made Taiwan. There is some truth to that.
  689. What is really a stretch to me is to make quick decisions.
  690. Usually with this genre the first thing that happens is a good fight sequence to show that you’re in good hands. So we broke that rule. I think a lot of that comes from the western audience.
  691. To me, Ennis stands for the conservative side of America. He’s the biggest homophobe in the whole movie – culturally and psychologically – but by the time he admits his feelings, it’s too late.
  692. Thinking back to those earlier days, I felt I was weak when I wasn’t making movies, and then when I was, I thought I was weak as a family member.
  693. These days I’m mostly familiar with two parts of L.A.: one is movie culture, and the other is Asian culture. The Westside is work, and the Eastside is Chinese – which means my friends.
  694. There’s only one movie in my career I’ve had regrets with cutting it shorter, and I think some scenes maybe I shouldn’t have cut.
  695. There’s a level of sophistication of filmmaking that’s mind-boggling. Anything you need for your movie, there’s an establishment that can make it happen really fast.
  696. The woman’s perspective is like the dark side of the moon: it always exists, but it is never exposed, at least not in my culture.
  697. The way I go about a lovemaking scene is that we will talk about it during the rehearsing time.
  698. The thing we call critics are not really reviewers, they are not really critics. They don’t have the discipline to write what we would term as critique – it’s really just reviewers. They have a common man kind of taste. If you watch them overall, they are not different from the box-office. That’s my view.
  699. The source of all the material comes from nothingness, illusion is working more on things you can prove. That’s the principle, the essence of life, it is actually an illusion, not immaterial. That’s worth pursuing. So illusion is not nothing. In a way, that is the truth.
  700. The most mysterious feminine factor, the existence that we men, we don’t know. It’s woman. It’s feminine. That’s what the sword is about. That’s the symbolic meaning of the sword.
  701. The fear factor actually brings the genuineness.
  702. The father figure is something I love, but also suffocate from and want to work against.
  703. The L.A. weather is a lot like Taiwan’s, where you don’t observe four seasons, so the years can pass and you don’t feel a thing.
  704. Summer blockbusters are very expensive to make. They have things that have to be expensive, such as 600 effects shots or CG characters that have to go a certain way, or a film design that is different but expensive.
  705. Sometimes, you have to get angry to get things done.
  706. Sometimes films ignore other points of view because it’s simpler to tell the story that way, but the more genuine and sympathetic you are to different points of view and situations, the more real the story is.
  707. Some actors give you what you want. Some you have to make do what you want.
  708. So many times you see beautiful lovemaking scenes with a lot of exposure or an awkward lovemaking scene, but I think it’s very rare that you see it private.
  709. Sexuality is a big issue, but there are others – how much you commit to a relationship, to social obligation, to honesty and being honest with yourself.
  710. Sensitivity and money are like parallel lines. They don’t meet.
  711. Over the years Woodstock got glorified and romanticised and became the event that symbolised Utopia. It’s the last page of our collective memory of the age of innocence. Then things turned ugly and would never be the same again.
  712. On a Chinese film you just give orders, no one questions you. Here, you have to convince people, you have to tell them why you want to do it a certain way, and they argue with you. Democracy.
  713. Now I’m kind of established as a director, I much prefer directing to writing.
  714. Not taboo – it’s just that straight actors still risk their careers commercially and economically. They have to please the crowd – they’re movie stars; their image is their industry. It goes beyond acting.
  715. No matter how widely spread out the films are, how different, you still are you.
  716. My mother loves me and everything goes well. I have no conflict with her, so that’s not dramatic.
  717. My hometown was one of the major U.S. Air Force bases.
  718. My first instinct was to cast as close to the short story as possible, but then I realized that I needed actors who could go for it and that they had to function well as a couple in a love story.
  719. My father was the center of the family, and everyone tried to please him.
  720. My culture doesn’t regard acting highly.
  721. My cultural roots are something illusive.
  722. Meanwhile, the Ice Storm was still in development, And that was something I really wanted to do, and frankly I don’t think I was ready to do a big production like this.
  723. Many times when you make a movie, it feels like your biggest mistake. But even if a film isn’t a hit, you shouldn’t view it as a mistake.
  724. Making movies is a way of understanding myself and the world.
  725. Kids don’t even read comic books anymore. They’ve got more important things to do – like video games.
  726. It’s not a pleasure torturing actors, although some of them enjoy it.
  727. In the past I’ve made movies that were pretty universally liked. You can’t really hate them. You can discard them, but you can’t really hate them.
  728. In my culture, there’s a tradition that when you’re in an overwhelming situation and you don’t know what to do, you put yourself in a woman’s shoes.
  729. In Taiwan, I’d be like Michael Jordan walking down the street.
  730. If there’s something that can be formulated, regulated, give you security, then nobody would lose money. Every movie would be successful. And that’s certainly not the case.
  731. I’m such a late bloomer.
  732. I’m still a novice student.
  733. I’m quite lazy.
  734. I’m not macho, I’m not a Mel Gibson sort of person.
  735. I’m not a romantic. In life I didn’t have much experience with romance.
  736. I’m not a master of films, I’m rather a slave.
  737. I’m just a pretty regular dad.
  738. I’m aware of what’s missing from my life.
  739. I’m actually living my life with the material I choose to work with.
  740. I’m a storyteller.
  741. I’m a shy human being.
  742. I’m a drifter and an outsider. There’s not one single environment I can totally belong to.
  743. I’m a big boy now, and I have to deliver.
  744. I was very quiet, very shy and docile.
  745. I wanted to shoot straight, mainstream, somehow off-beat. Not only realistic West, which is quite unfamiliar to the world’s population – even to a lot of Americans.
  746. I try to please everyone.
  747. I took the name Green Destiny from – well there is such a sword called Green Destiny. It is green because you keep twisting it, it’s an ancient skill, you keep twisting it and knocking it and twisting it until it is very elastic and light.
  748. I think the book struck me in a few ways that I thought very interesting to pick it as my first martial arts film. It has a very strong female character and it was very abundant in classic Chinese textures.
  749. I think the American West really attracts me because it’s romantic. The desert, the empty space, the drama.
  750. I think that at heart I am an old-fashioned Chinese, really I am.
  751. I think people are universal.
  752. I think life without spirit is in the dark, it is absurd.
  753. I think great romance needs great obstacles and textures.
  754. I think each movie-making process is a very exhausting and satisfying and fulfilling experience for me.
  755. I think doing period piece is easier, because after a certain distance, everybody is equal, I think. The relative contemporary is harder. I think that’s the way it is.
  756. I think a movie is a media that is evoking feelings.
  757. I think a lot of people do big movies not because they are talented artists but because they can function in the circumstances.
  758. I think I prefer 3D to 2D now.
  759. I think I can work with any type of actor.
  760. I look at American movies, the big muscles, and try to apply that to Chinese film-making.
  761. I like to think I’m un-categorisable.
  762. I like to do drama, something about life that could be disappointing.
  763. I hope people don’t compare 2D and 3D because 3D’s new, it’s unfair to compare to 2D which is really sophisticated, even when we’re jaded about it. 3D just began, give it a chance, let the equipment and projection system catch up and be better, let the price go down, let more filmmakers get a hold of it more easily.
  764. I have two sons in America, and all they care about in Chinese culture is Jackie Chan and Jet Li.
  765. I have a lot of repression. So repression is what I make movies about.
  766. I hate to think life is just facts and laws.
  767. I had to test a new terror in myself.
  768. I had to find my way of translating the excitement you get when you’re reading comic books to the big screen.
  769. I guess in Hollywood you chart your life by Oscars. You say to each other, ‘Remember when that movie won that year? It was 2006. Remember that?’
  770. I grew up pretty peacefully, in that Eastern way. You easily solve problems, believe in harmony. Reduce conflicts, take orders until one day you give orders.
  771. I grew up pretty much prevented from knowing anything from Communist China except that they were the bad guys that stole our country.
  772. I find it hard to deliver straightforward things.
  773. I feel that everyone has a Hulk inside, and each of our Hulks is both scary and, potentially, pleasurable. That’s the scariest thing about them.
  774. I feel like all of my characters now take this congested situation, they clash, and from there you purge yourself.
  775. I don’t think the Hulk is a superhero. He’s the first Marvel character who is a tragic monster. Really an anti-hero.
  776. I don’t like to deal with studios.
  777. I don’t lead a Hollywood lifestyle.
  778. I don’t know if I make the best gay films.
  779. I don’t have incredible knowledge about films or of filmmaking history; I’m not that kind of person.
  780. I don’t have a superpower.
  781. I don’t care about writing really.
  782. I do like challenge.
  783. I did a women’s movie, and I’m not a woman. I did a gay movie, and I’m not gay. I learned as I went along.
  784. I am not particularly religious. But I think we do face the question of where God is, why we are created and where does life go, why we exist. That sort of thing. And it is very hard to talk about it these days, because it cannot be proven. It is hard to discuss it rationally.
  785. I am a shy person.
  786. For six years, from 1985 to 1991, I felt pretty weak and useless.
  787. For a filmmaker, it’s a rare chance to do a personal film on a big canvas.
  788. Film study was considered disgraceful by my father.
  789. Fighting for identity is something that is very much in my life.
  790. Everyone in the gay community doesn’t think alike.
  791. Every movie is unknown.
  792. Emotions serve characters’ purposes. That is their motivation.
  793. Economically, it’s more expensive to make movies. I hope digital movies change that.
  794. Directing, I get all kinds of inspiration. It’s working with people. It’s a lot more fun.
  795. As artists, we like night more than day sometimes.
  796. Americans are hidden dragons to me.
  797. After making several tragic movies in a row, I was looking to do a comedy, and one without cynicism.
  798. A movie is really provocation. It’s not a message, it’s not a statement.
  799. 3D is quite a lot more advanced in animated movies; for live-action movies we’re just taking baby steps, we’re just in the beginning.
  800. True artistic expression lies in conveying emotion.
  801. There’s a huge difference between who I am when I make music and who I am the rest of the time.
  802. Love is boundary-less.
  803. Living in New York, you get a lot of confidence; when I go back to Michigan, I realise how obnoxious and demanding and straightforward I am.
  804. I was going to go to school to become a neurological surgeon.
  805. I want to be an artist you cannot categorize at all. You can’t put a box around me. You can’t put anything around me.
  806. I think of religion as something that stains the person. It’s a mindset you can never get free from, it’s always in the back of your head.
  807. I put everyone in my school on to Nicki Minaj before she blew up. I was obsessed with her and I was like, ‘If she’s the best female rapper then I’ve got to be better than her.’
  808. I love to listen to books on tape.
  809. I love rock women.
  810. I like The Smiths – I would love to do a song with The Smiths, because they are so sonically different.
  811. I have this desire to have this immaculate form of love that really doesn’t exist, so my obsession goes on through life and I never find it and I end up miserable. But it makes me a better writer.
  812. I don’t know, I feel like as time has gone on, hip-hop has become really redundant and repetitive.
  813. I don’t even really like rap music.
  814. I can’t really even name a person I like in hip-hop music.
  815. I can choose to be happy, or choose to be miserable every day – waiting until I die.
  816. Guys pit female rappers against each other because female rappers – if you haven’t noticed of late – are a lot more interesting than guys.
  817. Being honest with the public is how they respect you.
  818. You’re going to see relationships with technology across anything that’s brand. I don’t care if that’s in home or what you wear. I just think it’s a new fact of life.
  819. You have to realise that I am the third out of six children, and I am raised with very strong core values and a very strong upbringing. I always put myself in other people’s shoes.
  820. The thing is, I don’t want to be sold to when I walk into a store. I want to be welcomed.
  821. Store windows are like landing pages on the website.
  822. Just because you’re a luxury brand doesn’t mean you have to have an attitude.
  823. It is one of the most important parts of my job, showing that you can’t do it all.
  824. Intuition is the wisdom formed by feeling and instinct – a gift of knowing without reasoning… Belief is ignited by hope and supported by facts and evidence – it builds alignment and creates confidence. Belief is what sets energy in motion and creates the success that breeds more success.
  825. In China, you’ve got six people buying for one child. But the thing is, you’ve got the largest rising upper-middle class in the world.
  826. I’m nearly always at home at the weekends; that’s important for every working woman today, not just me. I don’t encourage people to come in at the weekend and work; I encourage people to go home and create great families.
  827. I work through teams. It’s the only way I know how to work.
  828. I think if I’m guilty of anything, I’m guilty of always being incredibly focused on the task at hand. So wherever I’ve worked, I’ve just always tried to do my best, achieve my best, build a great team around me.
  829. I hadn’t grown up always aspiring to be a CEO.
  830. I grew up in a physical world, and I speak English. The next generation is growing up in a digital world, and they speak social.
  831. I don’t want to be a great executive without being a great mum and a great wife. I don’t want to look back and say I wish I had done things differently. ‘Balance’ is a really big word for me.
  832. I don’t want to be a great chief executive without being a great mum and a great wife.
  833. I am not in favour of quotas. Just put the best person into the job. It is not about gender; it is about experience, leadership and vision.
  834. Forget luxury; as a great company you have to keep evolving.
  835. Everyone talks about building a relationship with your customer. I think you build one with your employees first.
  836. Everyone in the world should have a trench coat, and there should be a trench coat for everyone in the world. It does not matter your age; it doesn’t matter your gender.
  837. When I’m not working, I would kill to have some sort of creative outlet other than, say, a coloring book. And when I’m working, I want to do all those things I was griping about – you know, make a turkey-and-cheese sandwich, put it in a zip-top bag, and stick it in a lunch box right now!
  838. When I get bored, I get into trouble.
  839. When I feel like I’m not doing what I am supposed to as a mother, I will torture myself. I don’t know how to deal with it. I find some consolation in the fact that all mommies feel it. If there was a way to cure mommy guilt, I would bottle it and be a bazillionaire.
  840. My husband is the most brilliant father on the planet.
  841. My biggest insecurity is that my personality is too much, and as I get older, it’s just getting bigger.
  842. Let me tell you, when you’re pregnant with the first one, it’s great of course, all new and ‘Yay!’ With the second one it’s still okay; you can pay attention to number one and she can share in the joy of the pregnancy.
  843. It’s not like I don’t have my own wants and dreams anymore – it’s just that the kids come first. It’s primal.
  844. It breaks my heart that I don’t see my daughters every day, don’t get to hug them and brush their hair.
  845. If I have anything to say against Obama it’s not because I’m a racist, it’s because I don’t like what he’s doing as President and anybody should be able to feel that way, but what I find now is that if you say anything against him you’re called a racist.
  846. I’ve never been a good patient. I’m not good with pain. It is not for me.
  847. I’ve got three daughters and I’m going to stand up for them and support them in whatever they want to do.
  848. I’m very, very modest.
  849. I’m the kind of person who wants the people around me to be comfortable, to laugh, and to have a fabulous time – I want them to be as happy as I am.
  850. I’m super organized, but a horrible house cleaner.
  851. I’m just confused as to where we lost that in America because it is everyone’s God-given right to think the way they think and that’s fine. That’s why our ancestors came here to America, to believe what they want, pray how they want and follow a religion with whoever they want.
  852. I wouldn’t say Hollywood is anti-Republican, I certainly haven’t experienced that.
  853. I work 90 hours a week. I work 5 to 9, it’s not 9 to 5.
  854. I was not the most attractive child. I had two really big buck teeth. I was horrendous – long, lanky and gangly.
  855. I want my girls to be strong and self-sufficient.
  856. I think one of the greatest things about the Republican Party is the understanding, we don’t point fingers and we have class.
  857. I think it’s very hard in this day and age to raise little girls with morals, ethics and values, and them knowing that they are precious creations and that they are important.
  858. I pray every day for my little girls. It’s hard out there for the younger generation.
  859. I might not understand everything a Democrat or liberal thinks but hey let’s be honest, I don’t understand some of the things the Republicans think, but that doesn’t make me some dumb hick that doesn’t have the right to live here.
  860. I left ‘Law and Order’ because I really honestly did want to do movies and did want to be a movie star since I was a little girl.
  861. I learned a long time ago that it doesn’t make me less of a woman because my babies come out of a different place. My C-sections have been fine.
  862. I keep waiting, like in the cartoons, for an anvil to drop on my head.
  863. I don’t want to be unapproachable.
  864. I don’t have the time to curl up on my couch with a good book.
  865. I don’t care if you’re Republican or a Democrat or a Liberal, getting crucified for the way you think or believe, obviously if it’s not hurting anyone, it’s just Un-American.
  866. Here’s kind of my motto – if you’re not happy at home, you’re not happy anywhere else.
  867. Cancer affects everyone, and it’s up to all of us to support the important research that can one day make a much sought-after cure a reality.
  868. As an actor all we want to do is act and play people.
  869. All mothers go through the exact same things.
  870. After I quote unquote came out as a Republican, one of my dearest gay friends said to me, ‘You’ve got to go on a T.V. show and tell everyone you like gay people.’ I was like, ‘Why?’ He was like, ‘Because you’re a Republican.’ I was like, ‘I’m sorry who’s stereotyping who?’
  871. You leave home to seek your fortune and, when you get it, you go home and share it with your family.
  872. When you’re away for a long time, tastes change, fans move on. You hate to think about it, but it’s an ugly fact of life.
  873. We don’t do drugs, drink or use profanity. Instead we instill morals and values in my boys by raising them with a love of God and a love and respect for themselves and all people. I believe they will have a chance.
  874. Typically, the theme of my albums, if there is a theme, is, ‘How does it feel?’ And that always leads to love songs. It just does.
  875. Time has nothing to do with the gifts that the gods give you; it’s what you do.
  876. Oh my goodness, they are rocking so many variations of my high-top fade. I mean, Rihanna has taken it to a very angular 21st Century thing. Miss Fantasia has it in a very seductive, you know, up-flip, and it’s just lovely, right? Oh, I think it’s wonderful.
  877. My father worked on assembly lines in Detroit while I was growing up. Every day, I watched him do what he needed to do to support the family. But he told me, ‘Life is short. Do what you want to do.’
  878. Most artists are notoriously insecure, and I fall into that category.
  879. Long tresses down to the floor can be beautiful, if you have that, but learn to love what you have.
  880. It’s impossible to write and produce a record when your parents are dying. I really tried, I really, really tried, but it just wouldn’t come.
  881. If you have your own agenda and your own style and you don’t easily conform to what the masses are doing, you’re looked upon as being difficult. Whereas, I think of it as just being an individual.
  882. If I could be doing anything, I’d be laying on the floor in my birthday suit eating junk food and watching something dumb on TV.
  883. I’m used to getting up at 7, getting breakfast, getting the kids off to school, and doing the mommy thing and the wife thing and the daughter thing.
  884. I’m picking and choosing in terms of the stress factor. If it’s not fun, I’m not going to do it.
  885. I’d love to be the political voice of my generation, but that’s not my gift.
  886. I would say that my peak was making my first million at the ripe age of 29, after the first album.
  887. I would make far more money if every song were my own, but I don’t write to fill up the album with my songs.
  888. I used to sing at funeral homes for families that didn’t have a vocalist. I didn’t get paid. I needed to sing.
  889. I think there’s no sacrifice too great for family, whether it’s career, singing, whatever.
  890. I need my career. That’s what validates me.
  891. I made numerous attempts to find a way to do it all, to be a creative singer, songwriter, producer, and to be the mother, daughter, sister, lover, wife. And the thing about music is, with me, that she’s a harsh mistress. She does not come to me in the midst of stress.
  892. I love radio, but it’s a very limited thing today. Everything has to be edited down to 3:59, and too bad if I didn’t make my statement in three minutes and 59 seconds. Everybody’s song has to make its point so quickly.
  893. I have as many pictures of my vocal cords as I do of my children. I have a great ear, nose and throat doctor, and we look at them – if there’s some redness, maybe I’ll take a little time off.
  894. I don’t think being black has held me back at all. Being black makes you strong.
  895. I don’t let people use me. That’s why I like a small number of people in my life. The more people in my life, the more complex it becomes, so I just try to keep it at a minimum.
  896. I don’t even have voice mail, and people get all out of shape about that. But, you know what, I don’t want to transcribe your message; I want to talk to you. And that kind of freaks people out a bit. They go, ‘Oh, who has time to talk?’ and I’m like, ‘Well, I’m gonna make time.’
  897. Historically, in my generation, all of my heroes and heroines have had issues and problems. We all do.
  898. Completeness? Happiness? These words don’t come close to describing my emotions. There truly is nothing I can say to capture what motherhood means to me, particularly given my medical history.
  899. Chris Brown is brilliant. That cat is crazy brilliant, and I wish him the best.
  900. As soon as you get off stage, that’s the most dangerous time for a singer to kiss people because your vocal chords are receptive to any kind of germ.
  901. Applause felt like approval, and it became a drug that soothed the pain, but only temporarily.
  902. Women will change the corporation more than we expect.
  903. Women are starting something like twice as many companies as men, but the money is primarily going to companies started by men.
  904. We’re at unique point in history where the things that we are building are going to significantly impact our social, political, economical, and personal lives.
  905. Until Systers came into existence, the notion of a global ‘community of women in computer science’ did not exist.
  906. There is still a perception that the way women are isn’t necessarily what you need for the powerhouse start-ups.
  907. The stereotypes really play into what kinds of companies women can get funded for.
  908. The Internet enables us to share the ideas we have without having to create another hierarchy.
  909. The Internet does not have a reputation as being a particularly civilized place.
  910. None of these devices address that women keep track of many people’s lives, not just their own.
  911. Leaders of the future will have to be visionary and be able to bring people in – real communicators. These are things that women bring to leadership and executive positions, and it’s going to be incredibly valuable and incredibly in demand.
  912. It doesn’t help to just get women’s opinions and then turn them over to an all-white-male engineering team.
  913. If women want to ensure themselves a meaningful place in the future, they need to be among those determining how the technology will be used. They need to be among those deciding whether it will be the great leveler or simply serve to worsen social divisions.
  914. If we want technology to serve society rather than enslave it, we have to build systems accessible to all people – be they male or female, young, old, disabled, computer wizards or technophobes.
  915. I believe women think differently.
  916. You never know what you will learn till you start writing. Then you discover truths you never knew existed.
  917. You have no idea how promising the world begins to look once you have decided to have it all for yourself. And how much healthier your decisions are once they become entirely selfish.
  918. You can never betray the people who are dead, so you go on being a public Jew; the dead can’t answer slurs, but I’m here. I would love to think that Jesus wants me for a sunbeam, but he doesn’t.
  919. Writing novels preserves you in a state of innocence – a lot passes you by – simply because your attention is otherwise diverted.
  920. What is interesting about self-analysis is that it leads nowhere – it is an art form in itself.
  921. Time misspent in youth is sometimes all the freedom one ever has.
  922. There are moments when you feel free, moments when you have energy, moments when you have hope, but you can’t rely on any of these things to see you through. Circumstances do that.
  923. The lessons taught in great books are misleading. The commerce in life is rarely so simple and never so just.
  924. The essence of romantic love is that wonderful beginning, after which sadness and impossibility may become the rule.
  925. Real love is a pilgrimage. It happens when there is no strategy, but it is very rare because most people are strategists.
  926. People say that I am always serious and depressing, but it seems to me that the English are never serious – they are flippant, complacent, ineffable, but never serious, which is sometimes maddening.
  927. Old men should have more care to end life well than to live long.
  928. No blame should attach to telling the truth. But it does, it does.
  929. Like many rich men, he thought in anecdotes; like many simple women, she thought in terms of biography.
  930. Life… is not simply a series of exciting new ventures. The future is not always a whole new ball game. There tends to be unfinished business. One trails all sorts of things around with one, things that simply won’t be got rid of.
  931. It will be a pity if women in the more conventional mould are to be phased out, for there will never be anyone to go home to.
  932. It is my contention that Aesop was writing for the tortoise market. hares have no time to read.
  933. In real life, of course, it is the hare that wins. Every time. Look around you.
  934. In real life, it is the hare who wins. Every time. Look around you. And in any case it is my contention that Aesop was writing for the tortoise market. Hares have no time to read. They are too busy winning the game.
  935. If I were happy, married with six children, I wouldn’t be writing. And I doubt if I should want to.
  936. I’ve never got on very well with Jane Austen.
  937. I’m not very popular, because they’re bleak and they’re mournful and all the rest of it and I get censorious reviews. But I’m only writing fiction. I’m not making munitions, so I think it’s acceptable.
  938. I’m a middle-class, middle-brow novelist. And that’s it. It amuses me.
  939. I was brought up to look after my parents. My family were Polish Jews, and we lived with my grandmother, with uncles and aunts and cousins all around, and I thought everybody lived like that.
  940. I was a teacher most of my life, which I loved. I had a very happy working life, and when I retired, I thought I must do something, and I’ve always read a lot of fiction – you learn so much from fiction. My sentimental education came mostly from fiction, I should say, so I thought I’d try.
  941. I never learnt Hebrew because my health was fragile, and it was thought that learning Hebrew would be an added burden. I regret it, because I would like to be able to join in fully. Not that I am a believer, but I would like to be.
  942. Great writers are the saints for the godless.
  943. Good women always think it is their fault when someone else is being offensive. Bad women never take the blame for anything.
  944. Existentialism is about being a saint without God; being your own hero, without all the sanction and support of religion or society.
  945. All good fortune is a gift of the gods, and you don’t win the favor of the ancient gods by being good, but by being bold.
  946. Accountability in friendship is the equivalent of love without strategy.
  947. A man of such obvious and exemplary charm must be a liar.
  948. A complete woman is probably not a very admirable creature. She is manipulative, uses other people to get her own way, and works within whatever system she is in.
  949. Years ago nobody was elected on the economic ticket. It was either the education platform, or it was health or it was other issues. It is only recently that economic values have superceded every other human value.
  950. When you run an entrepreneurial business, you have hurry sickness – you don’t look back, you advance and consolidate. But it is such fun.
  951. There is no scientific answer for success. You can’t define it. You’ve simply got to live it and do it.
  952. The movement for the environment really only started in the mid 1970’s.
  953. The money that we make from the company goes into The Body Shop Foundation, which isn’t one of those awful tax shelters like some in America. It just functions to take the money and give it away.
  954. The market controls everything, but the market has no heart.
  955. The end result of kindness is that it draws people to you.
  956. The Body Shop Foundation is run by our staff and supports social activism and environmental activism. We don’t tend to support big agencies.
  957. Since the governments are in the pockets of businesses, who’s going to control this most powerful institution? Business is more powerful than politics, and it’s more powerful than religion. So it’s going to have to be the vigilante consumer.
  958. Over the past decade… while many businesses have pursued what I call ‘business as usual,’ I have been part of a different, smaller business movement, one that tried to put idealism back on the agenda.
  959. Nobody talks of entrepreneurship as survival, but that’s exactly what it is and what nurtures creative thinking.
  960. Look at the Quakers – they were excellent business people that never lied, never stole; they cared for their employees and the community which gave them the wealth. They never took more money out than they put back in.
  961. If you think you’re too small to have an impact, try going to bed with a mosquito.
  962. If you do things well, do them better. Be daring, be first, be different, be just.
  963. If I had learned more about business ahead of time, I would have been shaped into believing that it was only about finances and quality management.
  964. If I can’t do something for the public good, what the hell am I doing?
  965. I want to work for a company that contributes to and is part of the community. I want something not just to invest in. I want something to believe in.
  966. I traveled enormously during the 1960’s, when you measured everything by where you traveled and what you did as travelers.
  967. I didn’t go to business school, didn’t care about financial stuff and the stock market.
  968. I believe in businesses where you engage in creative thinking, and where you form some of your deepest relationships. If it isn’t about the production of the human spirit, we are in big trouble.
  969. I am still looking for the modern equivalent of those Quakers who ran successful businesses, made money because they offered honest products and treated their people decently… This business creed, sadly, seems long forgotten.
  970. Consumers have not been told effectively enough that they have huge power and that purchasing and shopping involve a moral choice.
  971. But the minute we went public on the stock market, which is how our wealth was created, it was no longer how many people you employed, it was how much you were worth and how much your company was worth.
  972. But if you can create an honorable livelihood, where you take your skills and use them and you earn a living from it, it gives you a sense of freedom and allows you to balance your life the way you want.
  973. At The Body Shop we had always been measured by how many jobs we had created, and I got a major award from the Queen on that.
  974. All through history, there have always been movements where business was not just about the accumulation of proceeds but also for the public good.
  975. When we deal with death, the pupils will always be fixed and dilated, which indicates that there is no longer brain activity or response.
  976. When I was seven years old, I fell in love with a series published by Bobbs-Merrill called ‘The Childhood of Famous Americans.’ In it, historical figures like Clara Barton, Nancy Hanks, Elias Howe, Patrick Henry, and dozens more came to life for me as children.
  977. When I did get married and then had children, it was Beatles’ songs I sang to them at night. As one of the youngest of 24 cousins, I had never held an infant or baby-sat. I didn’t know any lullabies, so I sang Sam and Grace to sleep with ‘I Will’ and ‘P.S. I Love You.’
  978. When I began my career as a flight attendant, I was a 21-year-old with a B.A. in English and stars in her eyes. I wanted to see every city in the world. I wanted to have adventures that, I hoped, would fuel a writing career some day.
  979. We were a family that made our Halloween costumes. Or, more accurately, my mother made them. She took no suggestions or advice. Halloween costumes were her territory. She was the brain behind my brother’s winning girl costume, stuffing her own bra with newspapers for him to wear under a cashmere sweater and smearing red lipstick on his lips.
  980. Through the eight books in ‘The Treasure Chest’ series, readers will meet twins Maisie and Felix and learn the secrets and rules of time travel, where they will encounter some of these famous and forgotten people. In Book 1, Clara Barton, then Alexander Hamilton, Pearl Buck, Harry Houdini, and on and on.
  981. This was 1978, when flying was still an occasion, a special grand event that took planning and care. I worked as a TWA flight attendant then. I stood in my Ralph Lauren uniform at the boarding door and smiled at the passengers through lips coated with lipstick that perfectly matched the stripe on my jacket. Mostly, the passengers smiled back.
  982. There are so many cruel decisions parents have to make when their child dies. The funeral director requested a sheet for the coffin, and I sent the cozy flannel one, pale blue with happy snowmen, that had just been put away with the winter linens.
  983. Since my brother died in 1982, my parents and I had formed a shaky tripod of a family; now that I’d lost my father too, it was too easy for me to glimpse a future point where I alone was the keeper of not just my own childhood memories, but of my family lore.
  984. My daughter, Grace, was not killed by a gun. She died suddenly at age 5 from a virulent form of strep. As I stood stunned in a church at her memorial, one of the hardest things I heard someone say was, ‘I’m going to go home and hug my child a little tighter.’ ‘Well, good for you,’ I thought. ‘I’m going to go home and scream.’
  985. My cousins and I used to play Beatle wives. We all wanted to be married to Paul, but John was O.K. too. None of us wanted Ringo. Or even worse, George.
  986. In my adult life, I had spent a lot of time angry at God, mostly over the sudden deaths in my family – my brother at 30, my daughter at 5.
  987. If watching your child die is a parent’s worst nightmare, imagine having to tell your other child that his sister is dead… Although I am certain that he cried, that we all cried, what I remember more is how we collapsed into each other, as if the weight of our loss literally crushed us.
  988. I write so that people will read what I write. I don’t want to write a book that a thousand people read, or just privileged people read. I want to write a book whose emotional truth people can understand. For me, that’s what it’s about.
  989. I was kind of an outsider growing up, and I preferred reading to being with other kids. When I was about seven, I started to write my own books. I never thought of myself as wanting to be a writer – I just was one.
  990. I was a mother who worked ridiculously hard to keep catastrophe at bay. I didn’t allow my kids to eat hamburgers for fear of E. coli. I didn’t allow them to play with rope, string, balloons – anything that might strangle them. They had to bite grapes in half, avoid lollipops, eat only when I could watch them.
  991. I was a daughterless mother. I had nowhere to put the things a mother places on her daughter. The nail polish I used to paint our toenails hardened. Our favorite videos gathered dust. Her small apron was in a box in the attic. Her shoes – the sparkly ones, the leopard rain boots, the ballet slippers – stood in a corner.
  992. I often feel that I have a split personality. I love more than anything to be in my study writing, but when it’s time to do a book tour, I love that extroverted part, too – talking to people, reading, traveling, going out into the world.
  993. I learned to knit in 2002, six months after my 5-year-old daughter, Grace, died suddenly from a virulent form of strep. I was unable to read or write, and friends suggested I take up knitting; almost immediately I fell under its spell.
  994. I have learned that there is more power in a good strong hug than in a thousand meaningful words.
  995. I have a fondness for writing about precocious, troubled teenagers, who are alienating, but kind of endearing. It’s from remembering so clearly that time in my own life. I experienced myself as more dramatically troubled than I was, but I just remember how it felt.
  996. I am thrilled to write ‘The Treasure Chest,’ and to bring to life not only the childhoods of famous people from history, but also the characters of Maisie and Felix, who I hope you will fall in love with just as I have!
  997. I am the woman with the cool vintage glasses… I am the proud wife beside her husband… I am the writer who has written a new novel.
  998. I am a step mother, so how children deal with divorce is something I’ve witnessed first hand and thought about a lot.
  999. Grief doesn’t have a plot. It isn’t smooth. There is no beginning and middle and end.
  1000. God does give us more than we can bear sometimes.